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Topic: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

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  1. #1

    String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Maybe I presented this earlier. Can't find the entry. But since I am "doing" another string quartet, I'd remembered that I made one for Randy. Yes, our esteemed and ever present Randy.

    String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major, Dedicated to Randy Bowser - all EWQL SO Platinum + Solo Instruments

    Part 1 - Adagio
    Part 2 - Scherzo (Molto Allegro)
    Part 3 - Moderato
    Part 4 - Allegro (Rondino)
    Score - pdf format

    Enjoy, it is springtime (I hope)

    Raymond

  2. #2
    Senior Member tedvanya's Avatar
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    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    I like the whole quartet. The best for me is the Allegro. In the Adagio, the ff choir, twice repeated, too high, ( I know, or guess, you wanted it to be strikingly loud), but IMHO it is a bit too much volume.
    I am sure you have published it before what you are using, but the piece sounds so natural, so open and sometimes REAL. It is masterfully done.
    Very good, bravo and I am applauding, hope you hear it...

    Ted

  3. #3

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    I wish I had something insightful to say. But all I can say is that I too listened to the Allegro and Adagio and enjoyed them both. Thanks for posting the score I would like to get better acquainted with the harmonic language you use. It does not sound like thee sort of thing that comes naturally to me.

  4. #4

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Ted, I will have a look at those high volume outbursts.
    RichardMc, the harmonic language? I don't know if you can pinpoint this. Inspired by the String Quartets of Shostakovich is all I can say.Thank you for your comments and time to listen.


    It is raining inspite of the forecast for a sunny day,

    Raymond

  5. #5

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Raymond,

    You are such a talented and prolific lad! My Raymond folder on my ipod is getting so large now, it's starting to rival my Mozart s and Beethoven folders!

    Seriously, this is another great work. I especially loved the Scherzo and Allegro movements. The scherzo pizz sections were a wonderful contrast to the absolutely gorgeous, flowing, middle section. I forgot I was listening to samples at this point. You really get the most out of EWQL here. Are the solo instruments included in the library?

    The last movement reminded me a bit of Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat, but this is not a criticism but rather a compliment. That piece has always been one of my favorites and so naturally I feel a real connection with your Allegro. Just great writing. I don't know your music educational background Raymond, but I would be interested to hear about it, but only if you want to divulge it.

    And thanks for the score. I really appreciate it when members include their score because it's such a learning experience and it helps in understanding the piece better.

    Thanks again for the post.

    Cass

  6. #6

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Quote Originally Posted by Cass Hansen View Post
    Raymond,

    You are such a talented and prolific lad! My Raymond folder on my ipod is getting so large now, it's starting to rival my Mozart s and Beethoven folders!

    Seriously, this is another great work. I especially loved the Scherzo and Allegro movements. The scherzo pizz sections were a wonderful contrast to the absolutely gorgeous, flowing, middle section. I forgot I was listening to samples at this point. You really get the most out of EWQL here. Are the solo instruments included in the library?

    The last movement reminded me a bit of Stravinsky's Histoire du soldat, but this is not a criticism but rather a compliment. That piece has always been one of my favorites and so naturally I feel a real connection with your Allegro. Just great writing. I don't know your music educational background Raymond, but I would be interested to hear about it, but only if you want to divulge it.

    And thanks for the score. I really appreciate it when members include their score because it's such a learning experience and it helps in understanding the piece better.

    Thanks again for the post.

    Cass
    Good morning Cass and others,

    since "Boston" I am a bit confused about this world. That even normal sports events can't be without such drama, it is just .... don't know the right words. I sincerely hope that none of you or your families got involved in those dramatic and sorrowful events.

    I am not familiar with Histoire d'un soldat. Never heard this and I will immediately look on the Internet for a recording of this, just to check. About my musical background, oh boy, bluntly saying I have NONE. At least no formal musical education at some conservatory, musicschool or else. I am studying music at home, from books (CD included) e.a.

    But what is musical education? I am 69 years of age now. And since my birth and even before (must have been) I am listening music. My parents were singers in a professional and international wellknown choir. Composers and musicians frequented our house and since my 4th birthday I got pianolessons. My elder sister and I, we had to play "house concerts". Perfect pitch, astonishing technique, fine ear for harmonic lines and contrasts, everything pointed to an education at the Amsterdam Conservatory, but due to dramatic family issues I never got that far. Eventually I ended up with a job in the ICT sector, but kept on playing and giving house concerts, had pianolessons again and even for a two years span cello lessons.

    There is no day without music, maybe not on the radio or TV, but in my head new ideas are growing, rejected again, shaped to some sort of "song" and after some days (sometimes weeks) I will sit down and translate those ideas into musical notes, but more musical moods. Of course I do quite a lot of listening, at the concerthalls as well as CD's. Often I have the score in front of me, telling me why it sounds as it sounds and why the composer took that road.

    Entering again the Conservatory, now that I am retired? No, I will do my studies at home. It is all some sort of a hobby, not profession and I love it every day (sometimes I hate it, because of the effort one has to make to let the piece shine - recording/rendering). As valid for everybody, making music is a queste, exploring new tonal settings, harmonic developments, etc..... it must be a joy to hear that your themes come out so beautiful. sometimes better than thought in the first place.

    I can go on telling you a lot more, but this is it in a nutshell. I don't want writing an autobiography, I have nothing to say, in the contrarary I have a lot to sing. My music is my biography.

    Cass, thank you for your interest and buy a larger iPod with more Gb's on it. There is a lot more coming. And Beethoven and fellows are better than me, always.

    Raymond

  7. #7

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Thank you for sharing some of your background. It gives me great encouragement. I have shared on this forum that I received private instruction in guitar and theory as a teenager. I was learning jazz guitar and had to learn theory to learn improvisation. But my classical theory is primarily the product of self study. I too made my education and professional decisions long ago and am in no position to start a new education. Thank god for books, technology and forums such as this. But I must say that I am inspired after hearing your work to learn that you are primarily self-taught. It shows me what is possible with work and determination. Thank you.

  8. #8

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    We all thank you Raymond, profusely; those of us that have no musical education under our belt (of which I'm included) we now can believe that it is alright to be self-taught and still write amazing works. Yes, it takes lots and lots of self-determination, reading, listening, and drive, but it is possible. You attest to that fact. Thanks so much for sharing part of your life's history with us. I really enjoyed reading it.

    As for Histoire Du Soldat by Stravinsky, besides his opera "Nightingale", I believe it was his first instrumental work after "The Rite of Spring". There are narrated and instrument only versions of it, the narrated being the original and is about an hour long.

    It was written 5 years later because World War I broke out and all the musicians went to war. After the war, only a fraction of them returned so a huge orchestral work such as his last 3 ballets was out of the question at that time. Stravinsky was forced to write for chamber orchestra, and I'm glad he did. This is a gem. Hope you enjoy the listen.

    Cass

  9. #9

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Quote Originally Posted by Cass Hansen View Post
    We all thank you Raymond, profusely; those of us that have no musical education under our belt (of which I'm included) we now can believe that it is alright to be self-taught and still write amazing works. Yes, it takes lots and lots of self-determination, reading, listening, and drive, but it is possible. You attest to that fact. Thanks so much for sharing part of your life's history with us. I really enjoyed reading it.
    One very important remark: When you are young enough and when you are driven enough, always go to a formal musical education. It is the most important thing getting somewhere in this world, musically spoken. Read the biography of Anton Diepenbrock and better Sir Colin Davis (conductor), very recently died. Colin Davis took the long road, he never could attend the classes for conducting because he couldn't play the piano (what has playing a piano to do with conducting?).

    Any recognition of being a musician comes from your fellow students and/or professors, if you want to. This world is so snobbish.

    Raymond

  10. #10

    Re: String Quartet nr. 1 Eb Major

    Quote Originally Posted by Cass Hansen View Post
    We all thank you Raymond, profusely; those of us that have no musical education under our belt (of which I'm included) we now can believe that it is alright to be self-taught and still write amazing works.

    Cass
    You are self taught? Your kidding! This is the most encouraging thing I have heard in a long, long time. Last night I was listening to the Meadowlark again. I love that piece in concept and in result.

    And Raymond I agree wholeheartedly there is no substitute for a formal musical education. As I have lamented elsewhere my education decisions were made long ago and there is no going back. But I am determined to learn to create the best music of which I am capable.

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