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Topic: OT : Counterpoint Study : which book to start with ?

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  1. #1

    OT : Counterpoint Study : which book to start with ?

    I\' d really like to fill in some gaps im my musical knowledge, and counterpoint study has been a \"left-aside\" part of this personal goal for a while (mostly because it\'s one or two more clefs to learn...).
    I guess now I\'m ready to try, so :
    Which book would you recommend to start with, in order to :
    -keep interested as long as possible,
    -get a solid but friendly approach,
    -learn the right rules but not too many \"blind\" rules (I need to be given some objective explanation about why something is allowed or is not, because it\'s in in my undisciplined nature to dislike (and not benefit from) the \"don\'t understand, just obey\" attitude).
    -learn practical things which are applicable to modern music and real world, not just to re-make Bach\'s chorales.
    ----
    I heard about Fux\'s, and Salzer & Schachter\'s books.
    - The first one, I believe, is several centuries old, so I fear a little the \"blind obeying\" thing (many heavy rules to painstakingly learn without knowing why).
    - The second one is more than 400 pages big, and also it has been said by some \"not for beginners\"... although I don\'t know if it means beginners in music, or beginners in counterpoint.
    ----
    So I\'d be grateful for any advice/hint/other book !

  2. #2

    Re: OT : Counterpoint Study : which book to start with ?

    Look at the traite de contrepoint by Noel Gallon and Marcel Bitsch, publisher: Durand, Paris, Place de la Madeleine, if I remember correctly...

    JW

  3. #3

    Re: OT : Counterpoint Study : which book to start with ?

    <U>Counterpoint</U>, The Polyphonic Vocal Style of the Sixteenth Century, by Knud Jeppesen, published by Prentice-Hall, 1939 -- one of the few books from my music school education that provided useful rules both for understanding older music and for cross-checking melodic lines even in newly-composed music.

    The sub-title makes it sound very specific to older music (and much of it is) but much music ever after has been written according to those rules.

  4. #4

    Re: OT : Counterpoint Study : which book to start with ?

    Hi sirbellog,

    I agree with VocalSampleSeeker that \"Counterpoint, The Polyphonic Vocal Style of the Sixteenth Century, by Knud Jeppesen\" is very good study and he (Jeppesen) explains why this and that are allowed etc.
    However, Jeppesen doesn\'t go into \"free\" counterpoint which Bach used most. But this book is good for getting strong sense of what counterpoint is all about.

    For \"free\" counterpoint, I can recommend Walter Pistons book named (you guessed it) \"Counterpoint\".

    With these two books, you\'re set to go to the adventures world of counterpoint. [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

  5. #5

    Re: OT : Counterpoint Study : which book to start with ?

    I have a book called \'Modern Contrapuntal Technique\' by Gordon Delamont which gives a nice overview of a more modern(as seen in 1969) approach(using poly tonal techniques etc) but not a strict classical approach if that\'s what you\'re after. However I think it covers a lot of film scoring type writing well...and if it sounds good,that\'s what it\'s all about. Probably hard to find, out of print, i picked a second hand copy god knows where...

    Brett

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