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Topic: Four Scores and Seven Hours Ago...

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  1. #1

    Four Scores and Seven Hours Ago...

    Four scores and seven hours ago our Rodney brought forth on this forum, a new notation, conceived at liberty, and dedicated to the proposition that all men can create equally. With all this talk of writing scores lately I decided to share some of mine. Three of the four are mostly brass scores which you’ve heard the music before but the last Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’ was written for solely percussion. I discovered a way to form a perfect marriage with Finale and Windows Live Movie Maker to produce a video of music with its score. Finale has a Graphics Tool that changes the pages of your score into pictures that you can save on your computer. Then you simply load up both pictures and mp3 to Windows Live Movie Maker, change the lengths of your pictures to match the music, add a title and closing credit page, and you’re finished. A member of another forum was asking about scoring for brass instruments which gave me the idea of sharing the scores on this forum also. Although all four of these pieces have been performed live at some point these recordings are a mix of live, Garritan, and Kurzweil. These works are separate from one another and in no way related as a whole. To see the scores clearly watch in HD and full screen.

    1. “Hymn” from the requiem “In Remembrance” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jBtVR...sl6P9PYzp1uJZw
    2. “Fanfare for Performance Seminar” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vW_mw...sl6P9PYzp1uJZw
    3. “Fanfare for Earth” http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0vFtK...sl6P9PYzp1uJZw
    4. “Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’” for percussion
    Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’ is a saying that the composer’s father used to quote often to him as a child, but now Mr. Money wishes to share this same advice to the next generation who wish also to partake in similar mischievous ambitions. Reminding both performer and listener that music is truly universal and the language of the soul, Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’ incorporates styles from all around the globe including: the reverberations of the rich culture in Africa, driving cadences found in the streets, homes, and hearts of Latin American, and modern dance rhythms pulsating in the clubs of Europe and the United States. The work opens as the cowbell takes center stage leading the ensemble and providing the framework for the entire piece. Each instrument has its moment to shine uniting under one exciting and exhilarating groove only refreshingly interrupted by syncopated African call-and-responses. Billy Joel once said, “No matter what culture we’re from, everyone loves music. It’s an explosive expression of humanity.” This composition tries to capture that spirit of humanity and culture, therefore failure to heed advice will lead to Cruisin’ for a Bruisin’.
    ~Rodney

  2. #2

    Re: Four Scores and Seven Hours Ago...

    What a fabulously fun post, Rodney! Your clever "Notationburg Address" alone deserves a round of applause.

    What you've done with the page turning screen captures works just great!-- And by choosing the full 1080 resolution with the YouTube gear control, and going full screen, I could read everything perfectly clearly. Love it.

    AND it's great to hear the Hymn and Fanfares again, only this time with the advantage of following along in the score. Both are magnificent, sounding so good, and looking so good on screen also.

    Since you had the YouTube player open to "Cruisin'" I started with that - As soon as I got an idea of what the music was like, I turned the speakers up so my wife could enjoy it along with me this morning. The variations of rhythms over the steady pulse are so effective, great syncopation that keeps it all so light and fun, despite the large number of percussion instruments. It's super.

    AND seeing the scores brings up at least one more notation question:

    --I see that you often tie percussion notes to a rest. I haven't been doing that, but it's probably the simplest, clearest way to show when something like a cymbal is meant to ring out - yes? I should go back through the scores I'm working on and use that notation when appropriate?

    THANKS for a smash bang start to our morning here - And, by the way, "You're cruisin' for a bruisin'" is something my older siblings would say to me when I'd invoked their ire, and that was with some regularity. Know that expression very well - Haven't thought of it in years.

    Randy

  3. #3

    Re: Four Scores and Seven Hours Ago...

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    What a fabulously fun post, Rodney! Your clever "Notationburg Address" alone deserves a round of applause.

    What you've done with the page turning screen captures works just great!-- And by choosing the full 1080 resolution with the YouTube gear control, and going full screen, I could read everything perfectly clearly. Love it.

    AND it's great to hear the Hymn and Fanfares again, only this time with the advantage of following along in the score. Both are magnificent, sounding so good, and looking so good on screen also.

    Since you had the YouTube player open to "Cruisin'" I started with that - As soon as I got an idea of what the music was like, I turned the speakers up so my wife could enjoy it along with me this morning. The variations of rhythms over the steady pulse are so effective, great syncopation that keeps it all so light and fun, despite the large number of percussion instruments. It's super.

    AND seeing the scores brings up at least one more notation question:

    --I see that you often tie percussion notes to a rest. I haven't been doing that, but it's probably the simplest, clearest way to show when something like a cymbal is meant to ring out - yes? I should go back through the scores I'm working on and use that notation when appropriate?

    THANKS for a smash bang start to our morning here - And, by the way, "You're cruisin' for a bruisin'" is something my older siblings would say to me when I'd invoked their ire, and that was with some regularity. Know that expression very well - Haven't thought of it in years.

    Randy
    Thanks for listening and commenting Randy. It's always a joy to read your posts and responses. Concerning the ties in the percussion parts, yes they mean let ring. I have no problem using them with instruments such as cymbals, bass drums, or anything else that can ring forever. It's always a pleasure to hear when you say your wife enjoyed a work. I love hearing that. Cruisin' was a fun little piece to write. I wrote it for a middle school but anyone older could play it also. I wrote it as an example for the kids on how they could write a melody based on a rhythm. Thank you for listening to the other pieces and following the scores also Randy.
    ~Rodney

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