• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 5 of 5

Topic: Single coil pickups, release triggers

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Single coil pickups, release triggers

    1. Release triggers

    Hypothetical situation: Suppose I make a one note region, give a basic 2 split keyswitch (for the main note wave file)then give it eight release trigger splits, each with a unique wave file mapped. What result will this give when that note is played and released?

    Regarding the range at the bottom of the screen: RTrig 0-15, 16-31, etc. - are those numbers the note-on velocities (or note-off?) at which the mapped wave file will play? Or is it pointless to have more than a two split RTrig dimension? Just trying to boost my understanding here.

    2. Single coil pickups. As part of learning the editor, I was doing a simple experiment recording my Epiphone Casino guitar. There was a lot of noise, which I discovered was par for the course with single coil pickups. Would a professional samplist leave this (or some portion of) in for that \'vintage hum\' or do a noise reduction pass and get rid of it? Could any experienced guitarists comment on this? Thanks.

  2. #2

    Re: Single coil pickups, release triggers

    Originally posted by stevefu:
    1. Release triggers

    2. Single coil pickups. As part of learning the editor, I was doing a simple experiment recording my Epiphone Casino guitar. There was a lot of noise, which I discovered was par for the course with single coil pickups. Would a professional samplist leave this (or some portion of) in for that \'vintage hum\' or do a noise reduction pass and get rid of it? Could any experienced guitarists comment on this? Thanks.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Hi Stevefu

    I would try and get rid of the noise at source. In the studio, one of the main source of noise with single coil pickups are CRT monitors, keep well away from them and you will probably find that sitting/standing at certain angles from the CRT will reduce noise drastically. Same thing applies to the transformers and LCD screens in studio equipment, try and keep away!

    Electric guitar strings are connected to the ground/earth of the mains supply. You may notice that if you touch the strings of an SC pickup guitar, hum is reduced and you often get a click sound as you touch the strings. Try and keep part of your skin in contact with the strings/bridge at all times when you\'re recording. It\'s also helpful to earth yourself. I often do this by plugging a cable with a metal 1/4 inch jack socket into my sock and then plugging the other end into a mixer channel or whatever.... seriously!!!!! It really does stop the click you often get when touching the strings of a SC guitar.

    If you do the above it is possible to get rid of most, if not all hum unless there is a problem with the wiring/pickups in the guitar. If you\'re using a high gain distortion sound then noise is inevitable and often part of the character of the sound IMO

    If you have to work with the samples you\'ve already done then try the Waves restoration plug-ins to do a clean up job.
    http://www.waves.com/
    There\'s a fully functional 14 day demo I think.

    If you\'re going to be doing a lot of studio recording with SC pickups it might be worth investigating \"noiseless\" pickups. They are available in most shapes/styles from various pick up manufactures. I\'m particularly impressed by the Kinman ones which I put in my guitar.

  3. #3

    Re: Single coil pickups, release triggers

    Steve, get rid of the noise before it hits the sampler.

    When noise is considered, there\'s a big difference between the output of a guitar playing a six string chord and a sampler playing a six note chord made up of samples from the same guitar.

    Guitar Chord > 6 Strings > one lot of noise
    Sampler > 6 notes > six lots of noise

    Because you sample noise every time you record the guitar into the sampler.

    It\'s a major drawback of samplers which few people are aware of. You really need to get as clean a signal as possible. Cleaner than your average recording of you can.

    If there\'s absolutely no way to clean up the signal, maybe you could use a touch of denoising software - the type which can \'sample\' the hum and then remove it, but you have to be very judicious with the amount you remove or you\'ll castrate your guitar sound as well.

  4. #4

    Re: Single coil pickups, release triggers

    re: Release Triggers.

    You know, I would hope that ou could get different release triggers depending on the note off value you send out, but I dont think it works that way.

    To be honest I\'m not sure. I thought it didn\'t work this way, but then I recently found out that some sequencing software dont actually send correct Note Off\'s and send out note value 0 instead, so any of the tests I\'ve done before could just be wrong due to the sequencer.

  5. #5

    Re: Single coil pickups, release triggers

    Thanks to all replies!

    Release triggers - I tested it with four splits and used random sounds (brass, gong, and flute) for easy release trigger identification. Ran it through Logic, changing the Release Velocity (meta-event in Event List editor) up and down to correspond, but it looks like Giga only recognizes the first RTrig split as the parent note and the last one as the release, ignoring any intermediate splits.

    Well, there\'s still unique RTrig per velocity split capability that gives some flexibility in making various releases more unique.

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •