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Topic: That "Holliwood sound"

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  1. #1

    That "Holliwood sound"

    Hi all,

    I\'ve been reeding a lot in this forum, and I must say that I found tons of usefull information here, so thank you all for sharing your thoughts, tips and tricks, and for maintaining this cool and serious forum.

    Now to the subject.

    I am not interested at all in getting that \"Holliwood sound\" which was thoroughly disscussed on many threads, I am not in the business, but I am curious about it.

    Holliwood pictures have allways been recorded with a live orchestra, right? so I must think that the majestic sound we are used today in feature films comes from the efforts of the team of sound engineers who mix that recordings.

    I am wondering if it doesn\'t happen the same way with sampled orchestras. For example: Mr. Garritan has posted many demos of classical music made with his Personal Orchestra [img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img] , and many of them sound really well. Wouldn\'t be possible to emulate that \"Hollywood sound\" at the mixing stage? An orchestra is an orchestra, after all. Why are most of you looking for orchestral libraries that sounds this way just out of the box? Is this only a time saving issue, or am I missing something?

    Thank you very much in advance,
    and Happy New Year [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

  2. #2

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    What\'s with the [img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img] ?

  3. #3

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    I really can not understand why people say \"Hollywood sound\". Huge sound??? Orquestra is always orquestra. I´ve read a lot of posts saing QLSO is for Hollywood sound. Is it rigth???
    The point is , the recording technique. Classical music is most of the time is recorded with one microphone position. The mixing is the natural one , this mean , the balance that the conductor require from the players. Almost no EQ , no pan no reverb or any other processing or effects.
    Most of the conductors still purists , (and I don´t want to discuss if it is good or bad). They just don´t want all this technology on their recordings. Just listen to Claudio Abbado , Bernard Haitink , Sir Gorge Solti... you can easily figure out that it´s a pure sound of an orquestra.
    I have some classical music recorded by Prof. Keith O. Johnson and they have all this \"Hollywood sound\" that people like to say. Does this mean the dead composers were thinking in Hollywood??? Of course not!!!
    Are you looking for big orquestral sound like soundtracks??? Listen to any Mahler´s symphony (mainly no.2,8 and 9) or Wagner´s Operas.
    John Williams is well-known for his amazing soudtracks but I don´t see any diference on sound between his \"normal\" classical musics and soundtracks. It´s simply because his sound engineer are the same.
    I don´t understand why people differ all this things. They´re all orquestras recorded in diferent ways.

  4. #4

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    Aaron,

    [img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img] was a joke. What I wrote sounded to me as if I where talking about his personal orchestra, and not GPO, nothing else.

    Leogiardini,

    That\'s exactly what I suposed. And then, don\'t you think it is all about composition, and engineering techniques?

  5. #5

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    And then, don\'t you think it is all about composition, and engineering techniques?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yes , it is.
    What I always don´t agree is when people say QLSO is for \"Hollywood sound\" only. I´ve been working with this library for some months and what I can tell you is that all the demos that you heard so far does not show all things the library is capable.QLSO works great on intimate sound , or I maybe hearing things on my music. [img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img] [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

  6. #6

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    One example of classical music that show what I´m talking about is \"Symphony no.1 The Lord of the Rings\" by Johan de Meij. It´s not a soundtrack , It´s a symphony composed before the movie. The recording technic is great , in other word \"Hollywood sound\"... [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

  7. #7

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    The Hollywood Sound has (like so many other issues raised here... [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] ) more to do with composition and orchestration than the orchestra or the size of it. Unless the \"Hollywood Sound\" has a very narrow definition of which I am not aware.

  8. #8

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    Any broad definition comes complete with an imposed constraint that doesn\'t actually exist. I think most of us can guess that the term hollywood in this context suggests a big, scintillating, cosmic, awesome (or whatever similar word you can think of) orchestral sound. I don\'t think it would make us think of a stereo mic\'d 7-piece chamber ensemble in a 30\' by 30\' studio.

    Its a daft definition perhaps, but then humans place things in pigeon-holes so that we can process information faster and, in the short-term at least, more accurately. I could describe a car in precise detail giving exact measurements of its dimensions and various bits and bobs, but if I were to say it looked like a sleek black porsche then you\'re probably going to conjure up an accurate enough impression, perhaps more so seeing as you will probably have a stereo-typical image with which to base your mental conclusion on.

    Trev

  9. #9

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    I agree with Simon. The \"Hollywood Sound\" refers to particular compositional and orchestrational techniques used by Hollywood composers. Now.....some of those techniques have been inspired by classical composers (Mahler, etc...).

    A couple good examples are Minor chords (simple triads) moving in intervals of a minor third. Or orchestrationally....a lot of octave doubling in the strings. Really.....a lot of doubling throughout the orchestra.

  10. #10

    Re: That "Holliwood sound"

    Originally posted by Brian W. Ralston:
    I agree with Simon. The \"Hollywood Sound\" refers to particular compositional and orchestrational techniques used by Hollywood composers. Now.....some of those techniques have been inspired by classical composers (Mahler, etc...).

    A couple good examples are Minor chords (simple triads) moving in intervals of a minor third. Or orchestrationally....a lot of octave doubling in the strings. Really.....a lot of doubling throughout the orchestra.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yep. What you guys are talking about is late Romanticism, pure and simple. Its the sound of Wagner, Mahler etc - tonal but highly chromatic, lots of doubling and rich, complex orchestration.

    Although to my ear there\'s also a fair bit of early modernism in a lot of Hollywood scores - Stravinsky, Bartok etc for the tense or spooky bits. I suppose the interesting thing about the language is the way these two styles (late Romanticism and early modernism) can co-exist in the same score, whereas they didn\'t really historically.

    But I think all of this has far more to do with the way the dots are written than with the EQ or reverb used. After all, good orchestration IS EQ and reverb - EQ when chords are balanced to emphasize a particular register, reverb when throbbing harp and string arpeggios create a complex sustain out of the fundamental chords.

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