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Topic: Help Setting up multiple PC network

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  1. #1

    Help Setting up multiple PC network

    Please explain this to me in as simple a way as possible. I\'ve read some of the previous topics of this subject. I am not too much of a computer person, especially not a networking person. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

    I am planning on building a second PC for as little money as I can so I can run other orchestral instruments on it with FX Teleport.

    1. What do I need so that I don\'t have to use a keyboard, mouse, monitor on that pc? KVM switch, and I saw Truespec uses Remote Desktop feature within Windows XP Pro. Are there any other options? What are the pros and cons of this?

    2. With fx teleport will it will transfer all the midi and audio through a network card, so I need a gigabit card on each pc?

    3. What else do I need to connect these two pcs? With a 2 pc system I would guess it\'s a simple wire that goes from one network card of pc2 to the network card of pc1? What if I wanted to get 3 or 4 pcs, would I need any additional networking devices to connect all these thiings?

    Cheers,

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    1) Those are your options. See Rip Rowan\'s \"wireless remote\" article at www.prorec.com to get some setup info which you can exptrapolate to your situation should you go that route. Some KVM systems are better than others. I used one on a theater show install in November that I would not recommend to my worst enemy (it would often stick or pause, and cause timing issues). I don\'t know what brand it was...I had them get rid of it on the second day, and just run a network connection instead.

    2) I would get Gigabit, so you\'ll be covered. FX-Teleport can and does work with 100 mbit Lan hardware, but you can load it up past the point of good operation if you get carried away. You will have a lot more growth potential with gigabit.

    3) Connecting two PCs requires what\'s called a \"crossover cable\" rather than a standard network cable. Strategically, unless another PC purchase is on the immediate horizon, I\'d go that route, and count on gigabit hubs and switches continuing to drop in price as the standard becomes more ubiqutous. I\'m not the supreme expert of networking myself, but I believe that what\'s referred to as a \"switch\" rather than a hub, is a more robust solution. I have hubs, they work well. Perhaps a hardware brainiac could educate us all on this?

  3. #3

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    Get a switch, not a hub.

    A hub defaults to the lowest common demoninator speed, and essentially ties all of the wires together in one big knot. When A talks to B, C and D can\'t talk at all.

    A switch dynamically ties two nodes together at a time. That means that A can talk to B at their full speed while C talks to D at thier speed. With a Gigabit switch A and B could be doing FxTeleport stuff at Gigabit rates while C and D are doing 10-BaseT data chores.

    Hubs used to be much cheaper than switches. Lately the cost differences aren\'t as big.

  4. #4

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    Here\'s a pretty good article:

    \"What is the difference between an Ethernet hub and switch? Although hubs and switches both glue the PCs in a network together, a switch is more expansive and generally considered faster than a hub. ...\"
    http://duxcw.com/faq/network/hubsw.htm

    BTW PanzerD, setting up a network is quite simple with brands like Linksys, and others, since they come with software that configures your PCs for you and also include plus phone support. Feel free to PM me for model numbers of routers and KVM switches if you like.

  5. #5

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    At your service.

    A hub is a dumb connection device that broadcasts all packets that it receives to all of its outputs. As you might imagine, this creates a lot of unnecessary traffic on the network as each machine has to check whether the packet is addressed to it.

    A switch is a smart device that memorizes all the devices attached to it so that when it gets a packet from one device addressed to another, it sends it straight to that port and does not broadcast anything. If it has never seen the requested device before, it broadcasts to all ports, but then learns the \"right\" port for the next request. In this way, most (almost all) of the packets arriving at a workstation or server (or other device) are for that device.

    On a network with only two or 3 devices, the difference may not be dramatic since there will not be that much traffic. However, in many cases switches are full duplex (communications can go in both directions at the same time) where hubs may not be. That speeds things up tremendously (up to twice as fast).

    A crossover cable will be fine if you are sure that you will have only two machines, but if you are going to have two machines connected and you also want to connect to the internet through a router, then you are no longer able to use a crossover cable. With the price of switches so low these days (you can buy a Linksys 5 port gigabit switch for $130), it hardly pays to connect the machines directly.

    Remote desktop is a good way to connect, but there may be times when you need to boot up and use just the remote, so a KVM switch would be more versatile (and cost more). I have 4 machines connected to a KVM switch including 2 servers, a Mackie d8b console, and a Giga machine. It works great! And if you get one with additional ports, when you want to add more giga machines, you just plug them in.

    -- Martin

  6. #6

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    Thank you all for the help. It is becoming more clear now. [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

    What KVM switch do you mschiff /all use?

    If I got something like a Linksys 5 port gigabit. What would I need to connect it with my gigabit network cards?

    Cheers

  7. #7

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    I use a Cybex Switchview KVM.

    You would need an ethernet RJ45 cable rated for Gigabit traffic (most are) from each network card to the switch. A standard cable, not a crossover. And of course, it has to be long enough [grin].

    With Windows XP, it is pretty much plug and play.

    If you want to connect to the internet (so you can authorize your libraries [grin]), you can get a combination router/switch that contains both and connects to your cable modem or DSL.

    -- Martin

  8. #8

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    IOGEAR Miniview SE 4 port PS/2 KVM switch. Hit CTRL twice (among other methods) and it take you to the next PC. Never a problem with it. The IOGEAR sits upright so it has a small footprint and comes with cables. Get a recommendation on KVMs though since many have had problems with certain models.

  9. #9

    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    Originally posted by panzerD:
    If I got something like a Linksys 5 port gigabit. What would I need to connect it with my gigabit network cards?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">the 5 port gigabit linksys i tried had a god awfull colling fan. i then went hawk 8 port.

    good luck
    douglas

  10. #10
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Help Setting up multiple PC network

    Thanks, brainiacs!!

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