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Topic: Namm Thoughts

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  1. #1

    Namm Thoughts

    It was a fun Namm show for me this year. It was great to see some of the NS crowd. I finally met the Project Sam guys and hung out with some of the Vienna crew. I\'ve got my copy of Glass and Stones, so maybe I\'ll post a demo next week. I am going snowboarding so I will miss tonight\'s dinner. Interesting Namm though. Samplers are evolving and yet most of the big developers are abandoning samplers for Virtual Instruments. We\'ll see what happens.

  2. #2

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Another observation: convergence not convolution. The quiet surprise was seeing Adobe promoting Premier Pro, Sony with their new ownership of Sonic Foundry products, and Pinnacle promoting their video programs. This is the ultimate direction.

  3. #3

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    I couldnt make it to Namm this year.

    The only stones I got was kidneystones

  4. #4

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Originally posted by peter269:
    Another observation: convergence not convolution. The quiet surprise was seeing Adobe promoting Premier Pro, Sony with their new ownership of Sonic Foundry products, and Pinnacle promoting their video programs. This is the ultimate direction.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">True. Emagic/Mac are working on an end all 64 bit Mac audio/video app, but didn\'t show it.

  5. #5

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Celemony Software and Ueberschall are also jumping on the VSTI wagon. Soon everybody has their own sample player to contribute to the battle for the resources. Gigastudio will only be used and cherished by some secret underground rebellions led by Neo.


    ------------
    Alex Cremers

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Originally posted by peter269:
    Another observation: convergence not convolution. The quiet surprise was seeing Adobe promoting Premier Pro, Sony with their new ownership of Sonic Foundry products, and Pinnacle promoting their video programs. This is the ultimate direction.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Like all \"directions,\" though, there are some challenges in the new world order. Apple has basically reduced the entry level musicmaking application to a commoddity. While that may be viewed as highly enabling in one light, those programs--for both Apple and PC products--represent an income stream which gets reinvested in professional products, and into R & D. Steve Jobs has hurt a whole lot of people who supported his platform--some of their products, and even companies, may fail as a result of the loss of consumer channel income. If Bill Gates follows suit, and no reason to expect that he will not, then what has really happened with GarageBand is that many companies we all like very much, and depend upon, are losing a huge piece of their market.

    This trend also signifies the end of the independent music software development company as we know it. As it stands, Cakewalk is the only major player left standing. One has to wonder how long Greg can hold onto his company, if the expected slash-war on prosumer-level products continues and spreads.

    Indeed, look at the plight of the small-shop sample developer. If anything, the truly shocking story at NAMM lies in the exhibit floor plan. The major sample distributors had gigantic booths!! Yet we hear that the developers are starving to the point that they can\'t survive? Doesn\'t this seem odd?

    How does this emerging market reflect the values of art and musicianship?

    I don\'t know. But it\'s something to think about. On one hand, we generally abhor the corporate-mentality hijacking of our government. Yet our own industry is being gobbled up by corporate entities at every turn, and even our products are being judged primarily on their marketing potential, not on their purity and innovation--not even primarily on their quality. How does it look in a magazine ad? How does it look on the Guitar Center shelf? Is it in a flashy box?

    Is all of this actually good? Again, I just don\'t know. There are two schools of thought. One thinks the broader market will bring a Reaganomic trickle-down to the smaller pro market, and that money will continue to fund cutting edge R & D. The other thinks that the lowest common denominator will become the norm, and R & D money will be diverted to ever larger marketing teams with ever more control over products. In my experience, the balance has hovered somewhere in the middle thus far, but we are just seeing the very beginning of the \"music tools as commodity\" marketplace.

    Whatever happens, it will definitely change everything--and this IS different than the shifts we\'ve seen in this industry to date. Although we\'ve seen buyout/marketing related activity before, we have never seen anything remotely approaching the scale of the most recent shifts. This is cranked to 11, for better or worse.

    Ultimately, this all rides on the ability of these new \"owners\" of the industry to find markets sufficient to support their goals in this. If they succeed, people will find their niches and survive. However, if the \"giants\" realize they\'ve overestimated the market\'s potential, and these technologies start getting dropped, quite a few people (that have essentially brought us where we are right now) may lose it all. This happens. In fact, it has happened in my neighborhood several times--there\'s a strip of real estate which, for some reason, attracts real estate sharks every ten years or so. The come in, buy it up, attempt to pump up values, kick out all the tenants, put in high dollar tenants--whose businesses then fail, the neighborhood becomes a ghost town, smaller businesses come back in, things become successful again at that level. Then the real estate sharks take notice, come in, buy it up....

    Over and over and over.

    It will be interesting to see where we end up. The traditional cycle has looked more like my neighborhood than the success story these corporations are currently envisioning. Maybe the ubiquity of the personal computer will make their quest a successful one on this round. But all of us middle-agers who have been in this business since we were young pups have seen this cycle before--and what usually happens is that the \"pumper-uppers\" get a hard cold reality check that the MI biz is only so big, and every time you try to pump it up any bigger, you just end up in the same place you started.

    Witness Mars. A store that had everything going for it--except the realization that the business just wasn\'t big enough for another WalMart.

  7. #7

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Hi Nick. It was great seeing you and your wife at the show and I too made a stop at VSL booth. I\'ve come home with Glass and Stone and Solo Strings and am eagerly waiting for your own products to ship (VOTA, Storm Drum, EWQL Symphonic Orchestra Gold and QL Rare Instruments are all on their way.)

    I thought there were a number of exciting things at the show. I spent most of time at the East Wast Soundsonline, VSL and Tascam booths. Now, some people are embracing VSTi sampling and meanwhile GS3 is finally expanding to provide the single computer output abilities to make it work within the sequncer (Rewire in this case) as well as vastly improving their reverb. Waves also had their Waves IR demos running and frankly their Sydney Opera House impulse is very impressive.

    All in all, it seems like there are a lot of exciting things going on whether you go VSTi or GS and devoted designers keep creating powerful and interesting libraries. I admit I was a little dissappointed by both the Garritan and Spectrasonics offerings at the show, but I\'m sure that next year will be more interesting. See everyone again next year!

  8. #8

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    This trend also signifies the end of the independent music software development company as we know it. As it stands, Cakewalk is the only major player left standing.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Well, I\'d have to add MOTU, Digidesign\'s list of plug-in developers, Waves, Sound Toys, Serrato, Native Instruments, Spectrasonics...and about 100 more to the list!

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Sorry, should have said DAW manufacturers. Of course you\'re right. MOTU slipped my mind...me being a PC guy and all. And I\'m not counting Digi, since they\'re a hardware company in disguise. [img]images/icons/tongue.gif[/img]

  10. #10

    Re: Namm Thoughts

    Originally posted by Sharmy:
    On a side note, though I am not currently a user of GPO, the ability of it to communicate with notation programs is astounding. I must admit if I had to score a piece for orchestra, play it midi and have it translate to Overture or sebelius etc, it is hands down the best thing i have seen.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Hi Craig!

    You really picked my curiosity with what you said about GPO integrating easily in notation programs... That might be what I\'m looking for when first composing a piece. Usually I compose in Sibelius first with cheap sounds, and when I\'m done, I then play all parts in Sonar with Giga sounds (mostly VSL). So anyways, maybe GPO could enhance my composition process...? Does anyone know where I can find info about this integration with notation programs?

    Thanks!
    Martin

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