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Topic: Studio engineering forum

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  1. #1

    Studio engineering forum

    Hi people

    I\'m having trouble recording an upright bass at the moment and could really do with some pointers re: eq, compression, mic placement etc. Does anybody know of a studio engineering forum that is as friendly, lively and informative as this one? [img]images/icons/tongue.gif[/img]

    thanks,
    Steve

  2. #2

    Re: Studio engineering forum

    I don\'t know of any but if you search through Bruce\'s comments you\'ll find an incredible amount of gold. Don\'t forget to check out all the other posts around Bruce\'s posts as well, he often gets involved in threads on the intricacies of engineering and he\'s covered a lot of ground here, and many others have offered a helluva lot of great stuff.

    If you copied and saved them all you\'d probably have a very useful manual.

    Bruce, it\'s time for you to write a book.

  3. #3

    Re: Studio engineering forum

    www.musicplayer.com

    Check out the George Massenburg, Roger Nichols, and David Frangioni forums.

    Kip

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Studio engineering forum

    Originally posted by sjduck:
    Hi people

    I\'m having trouble recording an upright bass at the moment and could really do with some pointers re: eq, compression, mic placement etc. Does anybody know of a studio engineering forum that is as friendly, lively and informative as this one? [img]images/icons/tongue.gif[/img]

    thanks,
    Steve
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">What kind of mics do you have available? I\'ll give you some starting points based on that.

  5. #5

    Re: Studio engineering forum

    Originally posted by Bardstown Audio:
    www.musicplayer.com

    Check out the George Massenburg, Roger Nichols, and David Frangioni forums.

    Kip
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Bruce does have considerable knowledge and experience along these lines as well. The reason I made reference to the musicplayer.com forum is because you were inquiring about forums, rather than asking a direct question to one of the Northern Sounds members.

    Any advice that Bruce gives on such issues is reliable and solid information, whereas on a lot of these newsgroups forums you have to \"sift\" through a lot of postings in order to determine whether or not the individual reply postings are qualified professional answers and solutions that you are seeking.

    Kip

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Studio engineering forum

    Originally posted by sjduck:
    You\'re absolutely right Kip. I requested info re a forum because I felt that this particular issue is a bit off topic.

    Bruce - thanks for your offer of help. The 3/4 bass in question has two specific devices attached to pickup its sound: 1) David Gage Realist pickup (a transducer I think) and 2) an AMT gooseneck condenser mic (which was around $500 I think. Both are mounted onto the bass itself. The pickup appears to give great low end and the mic appears to provide realistic \'woodiness\' to the sound. The problem is, the low mid frequencies are far too plentiful. The eq on my desk doesn\'t seem to cater for the particular area that I want to dampen. Should I buy a multiband EQ unit?

    I was wondering if you could offer any tried and tested techniques for recording this difficult instrument, with regard to eq, compression, preamps etc, as I\'m a bit of a newbie when it comes to recording. I do however, know what I like, (Christian McBride, Steve Rodby, for example), and know that what I\'m producing isn\'t it. [img]images/icons/confused.gif[/img]

    Many thanks,
    Steve.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I would not use either of those pickups, which would only be suitable for live reinforcement, really.

    I was wondering what mics YOU have available to you, and what sort of room. Based on that information I could give you some starting points. The built-ins definitely won\'t be it. Even if you dinked with a lot of multiband, etc., you\'d just be dealing with an already too compromised signal. Anything actually mounted ON the bass is going to get as much sympathetic vibration as signal from the air, and be way too close.

    Let me know what mics you\'ve got to work with.

  7. #7

    Re: Studio engineering forum

    At the moment, I only have a Joe Meek JM47. As I said, I\'m really just starting out at present. Does this mean that I\'ll need to get the credit card out again ...? [img]images/icons/shocked.gif[/img]

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Studio engineering forum

    Originally posted by sjduck:
    At the moment, I only have a Joe Meek JM47. As I said, I\'m really just starting out at present. Does this mean that I\'ll need to get the credit card out again ...? [img]images/icons/shocked.gif[/img]
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">No, actually you can try out that Joe Meek. It will be better than the stuff built onto the bass.

    Find your biggest, deadest, quietest room, and put the bass player there, as far from the walls as possible, but not dead center. Have him play, and just stand and listend about three feet from him. Do you hear a lot of reflection? If so, get blankets, whatever you have to absorb sound, and start covering reflective surfaces. Try to at least get the reflective content down sufficient to hear more bass than room at three feet.

    I would suggest first putting the mic about the height of the \"plucking\" hand, and about two to three feet from the player. Do some test recordings, play back, and adjust the position accordingly until you get the timbre that matches the rest of your recording.

    That\'s about all you can do. The better the bass sounds in a room, the better the recordging will be...so don\'t be afraid to try alternate rooms (I\'m assuming you\'re not recording at a studio, if so, then you\'ll probably be fine).

    Another alternative is to pay for a couple of hours studio time, and take advantage of a better treated room and a more extensive mic closet. If you do that, start with a Neumann U87 at between two and three feet, and see how you like that sound. If that seems too bright and \"scooped\" compared to the target sound, try an Electro Voice RE20 placed just a little closer...that will get a deeper more centered sound, but will be less sensitive to string squeaks, etc. It also depends on the player...if the player\'s really good, you\'ll want to hear every detail, if he\'s not super good, you may want to opt for the dynamic mic and lose a little of the \"chaos.\" A bass can make a lot of noise that\'s not necessarily musical if the player is a \"noisy\" type.

  9. #9

    Re: Studio engineering forum

    You\'re absolutely right Kip. I requested info re a forum because I felt that this particular issue is a bit off topic.

    Bruce - thanks for your offer of help. The 3/4 bass in question has two specific devices attached to pickup its sound: 1) David Gage Realist pickup (a transducer I think) and 2) an AMT gooseneck condenser mic (which was around $500 I think. Both are mounted onto the bass itself. The pickup appears to give great low end and the mic appears to provide realistic \'woodiness\' to the sound. The problem is, the low mid frequencies are far too plentiful. The eq on my desk doesn\'t seem to cater for the particular area that I want to dampen. Should I buy a multiband EQ unit?

    I was wondering if you could offer any tried and tested techniques for recording this difficult instrument, with regard to eq, compression, preamps etc, as I\'m a bit of a newbie when it comes to recording. I do however, know what I like, (Christian McBride, Steve Rodby, for example), and know that what I\'m producing isn\'t it. [img]images/icons/confused.gif[/img]

    Many thanks,
    Steve.

  10. #10

    Re: Studio engineering forum

    Bruce

    Thank you so much for taking the time to write about this. It sounds like a significant part of the recorded sound will be down to mic placement, which of course, is precisely what we\'ve been discussing with the Giga pianos for years. I shall go forth and experiment! [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img]

    thanks,
    Steve.

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