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Topic: Part writing

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  1. #1

    Part writing

    Sorry if this topic is off topic, but the members of this forum are those who I\'d like to ask:

    Do most of you compose parts in the instruments key or do you compose in concert pitch? I\'m not talking about pitch range.

  2. #2

    Re: Part writing

    I haven\'t come across a sample library pitched for particular instruments yet (that would be a nightmare [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img] ), so at the very least when sequencing, everything must be written in concert pitch.

    Depending on what I\'m writing, I sometimes get my thoughts out fast in Sebelius, then bring the part over to my sequencer and transpose it to concert pitch (then modify the heck out of it to cater to the sample.) By in large, most everything I write is to yeild results within the computer enviornment, so I write most often in the sequencer, everything in concert pitch.

  3. #3

    Re: Part writing

    You have to score and record in concert pitch.

  4. #4

    Re: Part writing

    Thank you,

    Since my post I went to the Vienna Symphonic Orchestra site...very nice site on instumentation and yes, seems like concert pitch is the standard today.

    Thanks again for helping me clarify this issue.

  5. #5

    Re: Part writing

    Up till recently, almost all commercial arrangers and orchestrators have had to deliver transposed scores, because the copyists charged a lot extra to transpose the parts. In the classical world, this was exclusively done until Scoenberg and his colleagues made the music so complex that using concert scores became more practical, (or even necessary). The computer has changed all that. Now it´s common to write in c, and then have the computer transpose the parts. It´s still common practice to print out the score transposed, though. Advantages of scoring tranposed (now I talk about working by hand,) besides economy, is that you get a better feeling of instrument ranges and tessitatura, and that the conductor can more easily communicate with the players in their own transposition. Another thing is that it actually reduce the number of errors somewhat, since you have to think a bit harder. For tonal music, it´s just a matter of training.

    Gaute Storaas

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Part writing

    Originally posted by birdwizard:

    Since my post I went to the Vienna Symphonic Orchestra site...very nice site on instumentation and yes, seems like concert pitch is the standard today.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I, too, find it most efficient to score in concert pitch, and to transpose parts after the fact if needed for printout. I\'ve never understood how anyone would work from transposed pitch in the composition process, anyway...and have not ever known anyone who did it.

    Generally, most people I know work up from scribbly piano sketches to the full-bore orchestration...even in MIDI.

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