• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Topic: ...getting into electronic music...

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    ...getting into electronic music...

    Well, I\'m very new to this. My aim is to mix my orchestral music with electronic sounds, like you can hear it in the MIB or planet of the apes soundtrack. I have been considering getting distorted reality 2 because there seems to be a large choice of different sounds (loops, pads, fx). I\'ve bben looking at Athmosphere, Triology and Stylus, too, but I don\'t really get what\'s the difference (soundwise to speak) between these and DR, is it the same, just larger and with better programming options. Any advice what to choose?
    I was wondering too, if in electronic music there are typical \"instruments\", like woodwinds, I mean certain \"types of sounds\" because actually I\'m quite lost in these demos?
    Please enleighten me!

  2. #2

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    Originally posted by Markus S:
    Well, I\'m very new to this. My aim is to mix my orchestral music with electronic sounds, like you can hear it in the MIB or planet of the apes soundtrack. I have been considering getting distorted reality 2 because there seems to be a large choice of different sounds (loops, pads, fx). I\'ve bben looking at Athmosphere, Triology and Stylus, too, but I don\'t really get what\'s the difference (soundwise to speak) between these and DR, is it the same, just larger and with better programming options. Any advice what to choose?
    I was wondering too, if in electronic music there are typical \"instruments\", like woodwinds, I mean certain \"types of sounds\" because actually I\'m quite lost in these demos?
    Please enleighten me!
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Heheh...good question...
    I guess you could say that in electronic you have your pads, drones, stabs, pulse bass, acid squelch, noise whooshes, sub sine bass, filtered drum loops, arped percussion...etc etc...

    Alex

  3. #3

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    I was jarred awake at 5AM this morning, so I thought I\'d start the long day by answering this post with my typical long-winded, over-bearing, erudite manner. [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img] First of all - great topic! As you can tell from this post, I\'m highly enthusitastic about electronic music, and believe that it adds levels of depth and expression to music that many here would be loathe to admit.

    It can be difficult to categorize electronic music. That\'s mainly because you can do just about *anything* to a sound and call it music these days. From a high-level academic perspective, you can impose a two-by-two matrix on electronically generated sounds:
    </font><ul type=\"square\">[*]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Sounds of definite pitch</font>[*]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Sounds of indefinite pitch</font>[*]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Sounds with definite start/attack</font>[*]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Sounds with indefinite start/attack</font>[/list]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">From the top-level matrix, I usually break things down into leads, pads, percussion, rhythms and textures - much like lex\'s list. Your electro-acoustic sounds that are emulations of real instruments but generated by obviously electronic means (Wendy Carlos\' \"Switched on Bach\", anyone?) fall into the definite attack, definite pitch category. By the same token, much of what is brought here can be pigeonholed into the same category, but I\'m making a distinction with regard to the core sound generation, that is, the base of the sound is something other than a recording (sample) of a real instrument.

    However, that distinction is mine... and therein lies the rub. I could probably get a large group of folks to agree with my categorization, and then proceed to create a long laundry list of exceptions that undermines its validity. Not only do we now have a \"smearing\" of the line between electronic and acoustic sounds with sampling and many of the \"re-synthesis\" that is becoming more prevalent today (granular processing in Native Instruments Kontakt as well as Camel Audio\'s additive resynthesis), but we also have the looping and file manipulation techniques that many electronic music pioneers started with (Vladimir Ussachevsky, anyone?) looming large in today\'s electronic landscape. However, there are still many folks who would argue that if you\'re not controlling the gesture behind a sound in more-or-less real time, that it\'s not really music. It\'s even arguable that if you record MIDI data in a sequencer and then edit those \"gestures\" afterward, that you are now stepping away from the purity of musical expression and therefore undermining the validity of that expression. So, the bottom line is - any categorization exists *not* as a fine black-and-white line of distinction from group to group - but in a smear of various shades of gray.

    If you look at electronic sound from a simplified \"production\" perspective, you basically have two camps:</font><ul type=\"square\">[*]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">sound through source generation and control</font>[*]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">file manipulation - looping, filtering, effects, etc.</font>[/list]<font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">When I was in school, I studied both methods, and found the modes of control based to musical articulation to be more gratifying. On the other hand, I was in class with a guy that had an ear and hands for jazz piano, but when he got to the reel-to-reel with a razor and a grease pencil, he could do absolutely AMAZING things. My assumption that schooled musicians would find that my preference to be more valid was deconstructed with a single 5-minute tape piece. [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img] So again, it really depends on where you want to make a distinction that matters.

    Other than what you\'ve mentioned in your post, the short list I would recommend:</font>
    1. <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Xphraze - This synth has almost everything you need to create textures, leads, pads, percussion loops - you name it. Add a comprehensive modulation matrix and some pretty nifty vector synthesis capabilities and you\'ve got the makings of a real winner. If you\'ve ever heard the constantly evoloving textures of the Prophet VS or Korg Wavestation, this synth will take you there and several levels beyond. They also have a new version (1.2) coming out that promises several new interesting features and a large group of \"expansion\" packs that will broaden the pallette of factory presets significantly. I will also be producing a CD-ROM tutorial set for this one, so there\'s help on the horizon for taming this beast.</font>
    2. <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Arturia\'s Analog Emulations - not only do they have the best Moog modular synthesizer emulation in the world, but they also have a very convincing emulation of a more well-known film scoring synth - the Yamaha CS-80. If you\'re not into deep and wide programming via patch cords or quirky front panel controls (CS fans know what I\'m talking about), you can also check out their latest, the minimoog V. It has a fat sound, the ability to play polyphonically, and some extensions like arpeggiator, stereo chorus and delay, and a nifty modulation matrix. You can\'t beat it for the price, either.</font>
    3. <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Sony Media Software (Sonic Foundry) Acid Pro 4.0 - I got this on a whim when they offered a crossgrade from Logic PC. I mainly use it for rendering one-shot audio files in sync with video clips, and occasionally use it to sweeten final mixes with iZotope\'s Ozone, but it\'s one of the originators for the latest looping craze, and it has a slew of built-in DX effects, a VSTi and ReWire host as well as rudimentary MIDI record and editing and surround processing capabilities.</font>
    4. <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Arturia\'s Storm Music Studio - If you\'re interested in loop-based groove creation as well as a nifty cross-section of synthesis engines, and want to maintain note-level control of your grooves before you commit them to tape - this is a great tool to consider. Once you get your head around the \"Kepler\" modular concept, you can create loops and variations and then drive them around the circle of fifths to generate a large number of musical and timbral variations in a short period of time. Version 3.0 of Storm will extend its current capabilities and open up the number of modules and effects that you can use simultaneously. I use this mainly as a ReWire slave to Cubase SX2, but it can also be called up as a VST instrument and various sound modules played like any other soft-synth.</font>
    5. <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">iZotope Trash and Spectron - aside from their incredible pre-mastering toolset - Ozone, I absolutely love iZotope\'s distortion/cabinet emulation and filtering plug-ins. Both of these plugs can have a profound effect on any sound, emulated or otherwise. Add to that the prospect of their development for a broader selection of plug-in formats, and you\'re going to start hearing a lot more from these folks in the future. If you want to take an axe that \"everyone\" is using and make a sound that is your own, look no further than these sound mangling jewels.</font>
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">There are many freeware and shareware options out there too, so you can get your feet wet without commiting too much time and money to a mode of working before you find the right fit for you. In the end, electronic music is very much like any other kind of music - you get out what you put into it. If you\'re just starting with synthesis, expect to have a long, arduous and ultimately rewarding adventure.

  4. #4
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    Reaktor should be on anyone\'s short list for electronic composition.

  5. #5

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    i think NI\'s Absynth 1&2 is a MUST...

    it was already used for matrix soundtrack...

  6. #6

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    The only thing you need to know about electronic music: Trent Reznor is God! [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

    Cool topic guys!

  7. #7

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    Wait a second, I even more puzzeled than before. I thought of buying a sample library like woodwinds of electronic sounds, but it looks like there are specialised tools to create ones own sounds, which is of course a thousend times more interesting. How does it work? Can I use for exemple my Sam horns and create a new sound with them using for exemple Reaktor? Or are there sounds that are \"better\" to create new ones than others?
    How do these tools compare to each other (thanks Housten for the input) ? Any recommandations?

  8. #8

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    Originally posted by Markus S:
    Well, I\'m very new to this. My aim is to mix my orchestral music with electronic sounds, like you can hear it in the MIB or planet of the apes soundtrack. I have been considering getting distorted reality 2 because there seems to be a large choice of different sounds (loops, pads, fx). I\'ve bben looking at Athmosphere, Triology and Stylus, too, but I don\'t really get what\'s the difference (soundwise to speak) between these and DR, is it the same, just larger and with better programming options. Any advice what to choose?
    I was wondering too, if in electronic music there are typical \"instruments\", like woodwinds, I mean certain \"types of sounds\" because actually I\'m quite lost in these demos?
    Please enleighten me!
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">The problem with using DR, or any other commercial sample library of electronic sounds, is you are using someone else\'s programming. In DR\'s case, Eric Pershing. The whole point \"ought\" to be, finding your own unique voice and style.

    Download the demo of Reaktor, and futz around with it. Also, listen to more electronica and discover what is going on in that world. If you can\'t distinguish various styles and artists, it would be like someone trying to write orchestral music but can\'t tell the difference between Bach and Mahler.

  9. #9

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    Yes you can use existing sounds as a basis. Absynth 2 will let you do this http://www.native-instruments.com/ but in most cases you may prefer to start from scratch. Sythesis has exploded in recent years. When the first comercial synths existed the where all using a technique called subtractive synthesis. You started off with a waveform rich in harmonics and used filters to modify it. That was back in the sixties. Check out these babies:http://www.stellacustomelectronics.com/ahparty.html Nowadays the world is your Oyster. Just download a bunch and load the presets and play. Arturias stuff is very good. If you have the money I would try and get a real synth instead of software synth. These guys are great http://synthesizers.com/

    Have Fun

    ed

  10. #10

    Re: ...getting into electronic music...

    Yes you can use existing sounds as a basis. Absynth 2 will let you do this http://www.native-instruments.com/ but in most cases you may prefer to start from scratch. Sythesis has exploded in recent years. When the first comercial synths existed the where all using a technique called subtractive synthesis. You started off with a waveform rich in harmonics and used filters to modify it. That was back in the sixties. Check out these babies: http://www.stellacustomelectronics.com/ahparty.html Nowadays the world is your Oyster. Just download a bunch and load the presets and play. Arturias stuff is very good. If you have the money I would try and get a real synth instead of software synth. These guys are great http://synthesizers.com/

    Have Fun

    ed

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •