• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 28

Topic: What is your favourite wave editor.

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    What is your favourite wave editor.

    Just curious as to the types of wave editors preferred. I\'m just wondering if there has been anything new that may have slipped by me.

    Please let me know how you find the ease of use.

  2. #2

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    PC,

    Sound Forge is my best one.

    Alan Russell

  3. #3

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    Thanks Alan whats the highest bit rate and sample frequency you can record at.

  4. #4

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    PC,

    since I use the Echo Layla24..it\'s
    24 bit 96 kHz.

    Alan Russell

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Central Point, Oregon
    Posts
    262

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    Originally posted by PaPa Chalk:
    I\'m just wondering what the final medium(CD,DVD,etc.)will be used by most. cd for example uses 16 bit 44.1k. This would require dithering if you use 24 bit. would it be better to just record and master at 16 bit 44.1k. rather than dither down form 24bit which could add noise.

    The new mediums(dvd\'s) and formats(mp3) have added more possiblities to the bit and sample rates.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Papa--

    Definitely record at 24 bits, and at higher sample rates if you can, and never let go of those original, high quality files---you never know what medium you might want to mix them to later even if CD is their first destination. Dithering algorithms from Waves, Apogee, Sony and others are pretty mature, so don\'t worry about the minimal noise. As the saying goes: Everybody\'s doin\' it!

  6. #6

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    Ok then it\'s better to record at the highest rate 32bit or 64bit which sound card allows this? I can understand 32to 16bit then 64bit to 32bit. Why 24bit? (thinking in terms of binary)

  7. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Central Point, Oregon
    Posts
    262

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    Only because 24 bit is the accepted norm at this point, and to my knowledge nothing higher has even been discussed as an option for new types of deliverable media. In golden-eared circles, the issue of whether anything higher than 24 bits is even necessary or discernable has been hotly debated, and the jury\'s still out.

    Even divisions aren\'t an issue with dithering, but are a consideration with digital sample rate conversion. Many, if not most, mastering engineers prefer to do realtime D/A-A/D transfers via high end converters when creating 16-bit, 44.1 masters from high sample rate mixes. Digital SRC, especially with uneven computations like 96 to 44.1, is generally frowned upon.

  8. #8

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    Wavelab 4 all the way.

    That combined with Vegas 4, simply cant live without for editing multiple files.

  9. #9

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    It is ironic that 24 bits soundcards is the current standard considering that the maximum real world resolution is only somewhere between 20-21 bits for the best quality ADC DAC system commercially available. Most sound cards noise floors however are just over 100 db which really puts them in at the 17-18 bit resolution. Just because of the way a computer stores data we all are wasting 5-6 bit on resolution that simply is not there !

    Ernest Cholakis
    Numerical Sound
    www.numericalsound.com

  10. #10

    Re: What is your favourite wave editor.

    Ernest it 100% correct. Extra bits beyond the quality of the output format is only significant when doing a lot of mixing/processing and you want to swamp out error accumulation in the lower order bits.

    Also, if you are generating all tones and rendering the files internally, then I/O limitations don\'t apply, technically speaking. All bits count until it\'s transferred to and played back on someone else\'s system (DVD-A, what have you), where once again D/A conversion error rears its ugly head.

    Here\'s an interesting article on floating versus double-precision audio processing, and can shed some light on the subject. There\'s also an interesting tidbit:
    A paper by James Moorer concludes that the choice of filter form/topology is more important than the number of bits used. If the wrong filter form is used, there can be problems even when using 64-bit processing! Once again, we come back to the fact that skillful programming is more important than raw number of bits in determining audio quality.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I\'ve been a Sound Forge user for ages, and have used Acid Pro 4 for DX effect automation with Ozone, but I\'m gravitating to Cubase and Nuendo with Ozone 3 and getting hyped about their VST version that\'s due out soon.

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •