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Topic: Black Grand Progress

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  1. #1

    Black Grand Progress

    I\'m getting so much questions about the upcoming Black Grand, so I thought I give you some words on how works progress:

    The instrument, a Steinway D Hamburg, made in -99 and bought by the Chamberorchestra in Orebro, Sweden last year for around $125,000, was recorded in the concerthall of Orebro.
    The reason for recording it there was that I wanted the Piano to work in it\'s natural \"habitat\" instead of a studio.
    It\'s a concert grand, and it\'s built to sound good in a concert hall!
    The problems with noise and other disturbing sounds wasn\'t that major. I mostly did this in the night or early in the morning, and if someone slammed the door (I had notes up everywhere in the building, but there\'s always one or two that missed it), I simply redid that note.

    The Steinway was recorded using SampleTekk\'s specially developed digital recording system SLH, (and no... it\'s NOT a mechanlical device!), from three different perspectives.
    One close, with mikes over the strings, one stereopair about 5 feet from the piano, and one stereo pair around 10 feet from the piano.
    Mikes used where Milab DC-96B for the close mid and top, MG UM70 for the close bottom, a pair of Neuman KM84 for mid ramged stereopair, and a pair of Rode NT5 for the distant stereo pair.
    Millenia preamps where used.
    The piano was recorded 16 velocities pedal up, 16 pedal down, and get this: 16 matching releasesamples! Boy, am I glad that GST3 is on it\'s way!
    As in the case of the White Grand, the whole notes where recorded. Why not the halfnotes?
    Well, the files and instrument would be to big, and in my opinion, I rather have 48 samples/note then less velocities and all the notes as I think this adds most value.

    The piano itself where served by a certified Steinway tech just prior to the recording and was tuned and checked several time during the recording.
    This Steinway is, what a concert pianist, describes as a soloists instrument. It\'s rather bright and can therefore be heard over an orchestra and are therefore very poulare among concert pianists.

    I really, really think that this is going to be something special....
    Stay tuned!

  2. #2

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Rather bright? I thought is was going to sound ...darker, you know, \"Black\" Grand?

  3. #3

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Hi Worra,

    Don\'t forget to record the resonance of the soundboard and of the hall. 48 samples per note, plus GigaPulse will definitely raise the bar. (The piano bar? [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] )

  4. #4

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Originally posted by Alexcremers:
    Rather bright? I thought is was going to sound ...darker, you know, \"Black\" Grand?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">It\'s darker! This piano has a totally different sound then the White Grand.

  5. #5

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Will you be sampling all 88 notes this time?

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Black Grand Progress

    He explained that in the first post...you may have missed it. Whole tones, 16 up, 16 down, 16 release.


    Considering Per\'s sampling methodology, and the RAM/storage tradeoffs in applying it to a half-step piano, this is a good compromise. 88 keys would be nice, but given the depth, it would be a hog--you\'d be talking something in the neighborhood of a 65% load on a 1.5GB machine.

    I\'m not sure if you have the White Grand, but I have always been a stickler for \"full-88\" pianos, and I found myself completely unaware of the whole tone sampling until I actually looked in the editor. I would have never guessed it.

  7. #7

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Originally posted by Bruce A. Richardson:

    88 keys would be nice, but given the depth, it would be a hog--you\'d be talking something in the neighborhood of a 65% load on a 1.5GB machine.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">With today\'s machines this would be a hog, yes, but what about in a few years when computers are 4-5 times as powerful?

  8. #8

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Originally posted by Lougheed:
    </font><blockquote><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><hr /><font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">It\'s darker! This piano has a totally different sound then the White Grand.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">That\'s a relief. The \"rather bright\" statement was bothering me. I too am seeking the ultimate \"dark\" piano.

    Lawrence
    </font><hr /></blockquote><font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">The ultimate Dark piano is Hans Adamson\'s Malmsjo. It\'s so dark you can\'t hear it if there\'s any other instruments [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  9. #9

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Worra
    This sounds exciting. But please don\'t make it too dark. I\'m looking for a full, rich piano with balls. It\'s quite easy to roll off the highs, but if they\'re not there in the first place, pushing them just seems to add noise. Michiel\'s D is a case in point.
    Looking forward to it,
    Steve

  10. #10

    Re: Black Grand Progress

    Originally posted by thesoundsmith:
    Just curious - if you\'re sampling every other note, why not every third? half-step up and down should make no significant difference from only half-step up, and would reduce the file size and programming effor even more, with no audible difference. What am I missing?

    Dasher
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Good question Dasher! Heck, why not sample just one note and just spread it up and down the keyboard? Now that would be one efficient and fantastic sounding piano! [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

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