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Topic: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

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  1. #1
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    Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    This is kind of a bread and butter articulation. Any ideas why it was left out?
    -J

  2. #2
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    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    J-
    It\'s not that staccatos were left out, but they are called something different. A Staccato means \"separated\" or \"detached\" and can refer to a type of bowstroke or a manner of playing. The decisions on the common articulation usage and naming conventions for each section was decided by the conductor. According to the conductor, the basic \"bread and butter\" staccato types of articulations for the cellos are the Martele, Marcato, Spiccato and Sforzando techniques. These common forms of staccato are in the library. You may also want to try the portatos and detache bowings as well.
    -Gary

  3. #3
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    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    Hi Gary,
    Thanks for the explanation. I guess I was just thinking of it differently. I will now add the snobby er...em... appropriate labels to them
    I actually ended up using the Sfz attacks which worked out nicely, thank you. This library sure is making my Halloween music sound much creepier
    -J

  4. #4
    PatS
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    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>. . . the basic \"bread and butter\" staccato types of articulations for the cellos are the Martele, Marcato, Spiccato and Sforzando techniques. These common forms of staccato are in the library.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Spiccato is an ideal substitute for staccato; in fact, many orchestration pedagogues refer to spiccato as \"off-the-string staccato.\" Therefore, it\'s safe to say that Gary has given us a staccato patch for cellos; it just has a different name.

    BTW, some of you may have noticed a curious term in Gary\'s description of spiccato in the Choices chapter of the manual: namely, \"off-the-bow staccato.\" That was my mistake; I meant \"off-the-string staccato.\" I must have been suffering from \"bow on the brain\" when I suggested the term to Gary. Unfortunately, I caught the error after he sent the manual to the printer.

    Getting back to the quote! Although I understand why Gary would refer to marcato, martelé, and sforzando as forms of staccato, I still tend to view staccato as a distinct type of on-the-string, non-legato articulation, whereby the \"onset-to-offset\" duration (the note value) is shortened. The shortening is, in fact, what creates the separation, even in the case of \"slurred staccato\" (shortened notes played under a single bow stroke). Marcato, martelé, and sforzando are more about accenting the tones than shortening them, although the \"stopping effect\" normally associated with these articulations can create a sense of shortening, even if the tones persist as written. Perhaps we should just classify these as \"heavy staccato.\"

    For what it\'s worth, the following is how categorize the different non-legato articulations (after Adler\'s and Blatter\'s orchestration texts). \"On-the-string\" refers to the fact that the bow remains on the strings during the articulation (lifting the bow, as required for repeated down-bow srokes, still qualifies as on-the-string). In contrast, \"off-the-string\" means that the bow deliberately or spontaneously bounces off the strings between successive notes. Incidentally, Gary describes these in great detail in the Choices chapter of The Maestro\'s Manual.


    *** On-the-String Bowings ***

    Détaché (alternating bow strokes; note values [i.e., durations] are played as written)

    Portato or Louré (slurred notes, but the bow briefly stops between note onsets; brushed or pushed effect)

    Staccato (shortened note values; non-slurred and slurred)

    Staccatissimo (greater shortening of note values; use the Short Staccato patch)

    Marcato (accented; alternating or repeated bow strokes)

    Martellato or Martelé (\"hammered\")

    Sforzando (Bam!)


    *** Off-the-String Bowings ***

    Spiccato (\"off-the-string staccato\"; subcategories are \"conscious\" [deliberate bouncing], \"spontaneous\" and \"slurred\" [under a single bow stroke]; up-bow spiccato is sometimes called \"staccato volante\"; down-bow spiccato is sometimes called \"saltando\")

    Sautillé (for some, just another name for \"spontaneous spiccato\")

    Ricochet or Jeté (the dropped bow bounces naturally on the string; the number of unforced bounces will vary)

    Arpeggiando (a slurred arpeggio played over three or four strings fast enough to cause the bow to jump spontaneously off the strings; use the Spiccato or Sautillé patch to simulate this technique)

    [This message has been edited by PatS (edited 10-12-2001).]

  5. #5

    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    Pat,
    Thanks for your informative post. I have copied this to put into my already bulging \'Fundamentals of String Theory\' folder.
    With all due respect, though, I believe you missed one of the lesser known, but quite spectacular \'off-the-string\' articulations.

    Launchee Ricochet Maestro: This is where the bow, upon bouncing off the string, flies out of the players hand and ricochets off the conductor\'s head. This is an elusive articulation to record because of microphone placement issues, and the tone quality depends greatly on the conductor\'s coiffure.
    Also, there are but very few masters of this technique.

    There\'s also a variation, suitably named
    \'Launchee Ricochet Wall\'. The conductor is spared, this one is off the wall.

    I will confess to being a little disappointed that neither of these articulations were included in the library, but if Gary can find another conductor, maybe he can do a retake for a future library update?

    Regards,
    Trond

  6. #6
    PatS
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    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    \"Launchee Ricochet Maestro\"
    \"Launchee Ricochet Wall\"

    Perfect! But you forgot one: \"Launchee Ricochet Audience.\" A big hit with the younger crowd, so I\'m told!

    Wouldn\'t it be great to see the entire string section of the Los Angeles or New York Philharmonic launch their bows and then duck under their music stands? Harry Partch must have called for one of these \"special\" articulations at least once in his lifetime.

    Thanks, Trond, for the laugh! It lightened an otherwise hectic morning.

    Pat

  7. #7
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    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    Good one Trond,
    \"Launchee Maestro Wall\"? - Of course this was included! During the recording sessions, there were times the Maestro went ballistic and flew off the wall. On Disc #16, \"Orchestra Strings Tuneup\", listen to it backwards, and if you listen hard enough, you may be able to hear the Maestro bouncing off the wall.
    Appreciate the laugh!
    Gary


    [This message has been edited by Garritan (edited 10-10-2001).]

  8. #8
    PatS
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    Re: Where are the Staccato Cellos?

    See my first post. I added a few references to The Maestro\'s Manual.

    Pat

    [This message has been edited by PatS (edited 10-12-2001).]

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