• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 4 of 4

Topic: 1st and 2nd violins

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    1st and 2nd violins

    Hi,

    I know that GOS has been advertised as having 2 violin sections that sound different. They do sound different and I like it. However I think that they sound a touch too different: the 1st violins are \"much\" brighter and have more aggressive attacks, on the \"sus\" instruments especially. I just wonder if this is the result of post production or of different recording techniques, I find myself using the 2nd violin patches more and more often as 1st violins.
    The latest GOS update contains sample performance files where the 1st and 2nd violin have a recommended eq of -6 dB at 2000 Hz. I wonder why a string section consisting of Stradivarii, Amati, Guarneri, Testori etc. would need that kind of brutal EQ.
    Don\'t get me wrong: I absolutely love GOS and work with the library on a daily basis, but ever since I got my new prototypes running, what used to be subtle becomes obvious.

    Sincerely,
    Jeannot Welter.

  2. #2

    Re: 1st and 2nd violins

    Rolling off some high fequencies in the violins is a pretty well known technique for warming up the sound and dirtying up the tracks a bit.

    I think the EQing becomes necessary in samples due to the \"ideal\" recording conditions. Usually when you listen to a real orchestra\'s recording, there is a lot of bleeding, room noise, and other factors that dull up the sound....plus of course post EQing done in the mixing stage.

    When you listen to a violin up close, it sounds pretty piercing, even painful to hear. It\'s usually a good idea to tone down the sound by applying some tasteful EQ.

    -6db at 2k sounds radical but in the grand scope of things it\'s not really. But experimentation and trying out new things will lead to your desired results!

  3. #3

    Re: 1st and 2nd violins

    Rolling off some high fequencies in the violins is a pretty well known technique for warming up the sound and dirtying up the tracks a bit.

    I think the EQing becomes necessary in samples due to the \"ideal\" recording conditions. Usually when you listen to a real orchestra\'s recording, there is a lot of bleeding, room noise, and other factors that dull up the sound....plus of course post EQing done in the mixing stage.

    When you listen to a violin up close, it sounds pretty piercing, even painful to hear. It\'s usually a good idea to tone down the sound by applying some tasteful EQ.

    -6db at 2k sounds radical but in the grand scope of things it\'s not really. But experimentation and trying out new things will lead to your desired results!

  4. #4

    Re: 1st and 2nd violins

    Jeannot,

    GOS, like all sample libraries, was recorded with a particular set of microphones into a particular set of mic preamps, extremely high quality ones to be sure, but not “characterless” – none are. Any given combination will have an identifiable character, even two different but extremely high quality ones. In the world of microphones and preamps there is no such thing as a totally neutral combination, and that’s before you even consider the larger variables of mic position and room acoustics. There is nothing sacred about the choices made for GOS and there is no reason for the user not to take advantage of the many tools available in today’s software (EQ, Mic simulation plugins, tube simulation plugins, etc.) to modify what was captured by the microphones. Their proper application can make small adjustments for relatively subtle changes (e.g. narrowing the difference you hear between the 1st and 2nd violins) or more drastic ones (e.g. using external EQ instead of WARM control). One of the wonderful things about this technology is that you are not limited to the choices made by the producers of a given library. You can make your own decisions about sound characteristics.

    As for the two GS setups included with the update: They are intended to demonstrate possible ways to use the GS mixing facilities for orchestral strings. One of the things that is illustrated is the use of the NFX4 plugin to vary the brightness of the mix, or even just a single string section, if you like. The EQ setting shows one possible choice. This is true for every other performance setting as well (panning, levels, output assignments, etc.). Use them as a starting point for experimentation. You may want to work in a completely different way but it may give you some ideas you hadn’t considered, an introduction to the possibilities.

    The only actual recommendation for EQ that I can find in the documentation for the GOS update applies to a new category of special purpose instruments called “TENDER.” They are intended for use in soft passages that require something very gentle and utilize the softest recorded samples. The EQ recommendation is in line with this purpose.

    Tom

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •