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Topic: What are the difference between the products..

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  1. #1

    What are the difference between the products..

    What are the major differences between the less expensive GPO and the Orchestral strings/giga studio product? Is it mostly just the quality of the final product, or does it come with other things?

    I am still slightly unclear as to how the GPO works. It comes with everything needed to function, correct? (I won\'t need any separate sequencers or anything?) I just open up the midi in Cubase and then apply the string samples after programing things in, or what?

  2. #2

    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    scherzo

    http://www.gigastrings.com/

    a whole mess of info right at your fingertips

    in short...
    gpo- full orchestra
    gos giga -strings galore

    cb

  3. #3
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    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    You have the rigth idea, Scherzo. Computer-based sample-playback music has three elements. A software sequencer in which to edit and save midi notation, a software sampler to play audio samples, and the audio samples themselves. GPO is the last two parts, combined; it includes all the audio samples in the orchestra as well as the soft-sampler to sound them.

    GOS is only the audio samples and additional programming to package them for use in, for example, Gigastudio. To use it you would have to already own both a sequencing software package and the Gigastudio software sampler. That\'s a chunk of change.

    Ultimately there is a fourth/fifth element, which would be a digital audio workstation package (if your sequencer software did not already meet this need), and an audio mastering software package (again, if your sequencer software did not already meet this need). Many hobbyists do all stages of the audio work within their sequencer package, as they are generally marketed as DAW software these days, combining both midi sequencing and audio hard-disk recording and rendering.

    I can heartily recommend GPO as a great starter scenario... you should be able to fully whet your appetite with the included software. If you decide to move on to more a more comprehensive DAW environment, GPO itself will still fit nicely in it as a virtual instrument in your expanding collection. For instance, I own the full Kontakt package, so I do not actually need the Kontakt Player, but it is still extremely convenient, as it already contains all the pre-programmed setups that comprise GPO. That is, even though I own the larger package, GPO in it\'s Kontakt Player incarnation is useful, I daresay practically necessary.

    I think it\'s this streamlined workflow capability that really makes GPO so.. cool !

  4. #4

    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    Thank you for the replies. You said that GPO includes the last two points you mentioned, but does it come with the \"sequencer in which to edit and save midi notation\"? And if not, do I have to buy one in order to be able to use GPO to make a finished product, and which sequencer do I need to buy?


    Thanks again!

  5. #5

    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    It even includes a basic notation package a sequencer, so the first item is covered as well.

  6. #6
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    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    The GPO package includes:
    1)All the samples for all the instruments, as advertised, programmed as predefined instruments for the Kontakt Player.
    2) The Kontakt player itself, that plays the samples themselves. In fact the samples and the player are so tightly integrated that the player has the Garritan GPO logo on it, as though it were a custom instance of Kontakt, which I suppose it is. (Other sample library manufacturers can and do package this way as well.) This is where Native Instruments really has their marketing act together.
    3) Cubasis VST, which is a lite sequencer software package.
    4)Overture SE, which is a notation software package.
    5)Ambience Reverb Plugin (VST), which is an effect plugin that will load into, in this case, Cubasis.

    That\'s what you get for $249. Pretty jaw-dropping.

    I am not a Cubase user (I am a Sonar guy), but the general sequence of events would be:
    1) Run Cubasis and start a new compostion.
    2) Insert an instance of Kontakt Player in Cubasis, associating the player with one or more midi tracks and audio outputs.
    3)If desired, add one or more instances of the Ambience reverb plugin on any audio outputs you desire.
    4)Enter your composition by computer keyboard entry or by recording midi from a connected keyboard or other midi controller (not required). Save your work at which point all the customization you have done is captured in the saved composition file.
    5)Run Overture against the midi file (may require a step to save the Cubasis format to a standard midi file first) and work with it to create a score, if desired. There might be some nuances here with file formats and conversion steps, but that should become self-evident as you learn how it works (which is half the fun). I don\'t know, as I say, I am not a Cubasis or Overture user.

    Here\'s the bottom line: if you have a computer with a sound card and speakers, everything you need to create, record, playback, and print out computer-based orchestral music is included in GPO. On the other hand, if you had purchased GOStrings for Gigastudio you would have to also own Gigastudio itself, obviously, as well as a sequencer package to drive Gigastudio. Cubasis would work in this latter capacity, so if you already had that, it evens the playing field a tad more for the comparison. At that point the difference would be the cost of Gigastudio itself, which would be between 200 and 600 bucks (approx) depending on what version you bought.

    This will sound lame, but it\'s true. It will all make sense and seem easy once you get started and have a week or two of experience.

  7. #7

    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    Since he didn\'t say which platform he is on, I just wanted to make one clarification: Cubasis is PC only. No mac version. Everything else mentioned \"is\" cross platform.

  8. #8

    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    Originally posted by Steve Lum:
    Here\'s the bottom line: if you have a computer with a sound card and speakers, everything you need to create, record, playback, and print out computer-based orchestral music is included in GPO.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Actually, you don\'t HAVE to have an add-on sound card in your computer if you buy a higher-end sequencer. You can use your computer\'s internal sound for monitoring and mixing, and then \"render\" your music to a CD.

    Many programs (I have Cubase SX) will let you sequence, mix, add reverb and other effects, and then render the final mix to many audio formats including music CD without a third-party sound card. You can always add that later. [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img]

  9. #9

    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    I have a PC (laptop). As to the sound card, would it be a better idea to purchase one of those external sound cards (like the Audigy sound blaster 2 nx) intead of using my laptop card? My laptop is fairly new, and I have good speakers that I got separately. Would buying this better external card make the sound a lot better, or will there not be a difference?

  10. #10
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    Re: What are the difference between the products..

    Actually, you don\'t HAVE to have an add-on sound card in your computer if you buy a higher-end sequencer. You can use your computer\'s internal sound for monitoring and mixing, and then \"render\" your music to a CD.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Right, sorry, a liberal use of the phrase \'sound card\'. I actually meant sound producing capabilities, inclusive of embedded sound cards.

    Would buying this better external card make the sound a lot better, or will there not be a difference?
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">That\'s a very wide question, and part of the answer is opinion or subjective. Generally, if you spend serious money on a pro quality audio interface and killer near-field monitors, yes, they will sound considerably better than a laptop with embedded sound card and speakers attached. But a pair of headphones plugged into your laptop will still get the job done, even if only in a minimalist way.

    The issue will be - let\'s say you burn a music CD off your laptop that you mixed with headphones - when you listen to your work on another system, you may hear unexpected things or maybe even not hear expected things, simply because the system you mixed on has limitations you could not hear until you played the product elsewhere. This is what mixing is all about, knowing, or having a darned good idea, how your mix will translate on other systems. But translation problems *can* be mitigated by experience. On the flipside, when you spend money on high quality studio gear, you are probably reducing the variables in that process. Ultimately it will be your ears that make it work, and outstanding results can be achieved on even the most sparse systems.

    If your need is simply to be able to compose, versus actually produce a duplication-ready CD master, there is no need to spend any big money up front. Try it. Your ears and your application will tell you if your setup is filling the bill. It\'s like anything else... some quality can be bought with cash, but there is a universal system of diminishing returns that suggests that beyond a point, additional hardware quality is bought at a very dear price, where cost per unit improvement is a steep slope.

    Steve

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