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Topic: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

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  1. #1

    What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    I was just curious to what people are using as sampling rates when composing. I am currently using a sample rate of 96KHZ 24 bit but I only ever make cds. Therefore, do you think it is best just to stick with 44Khz or 48Khz rather than the 96Khz? I am still trying to figure out if it really makes a difference since in the end it's just going to be 44Khz anyway.

    Regards,

    Richard

  2. #2
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    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    I work at 44.1 KHz, 24 bit. Keeps the file sizes smaller for audio files. Most sample libraries are at this sample rate.

    Since most of my music goes to CD, I don't see any reason to use a higher sample rate.

    Jim

  3. #3

    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    Like Haydn I use 44.1 kHz and 24 bit depth for mixing, since the majority of my work goes to CD.

    If it were for DVD then 48kHz would be required.

    In all the published double blind listening tests no one can hear any difference anyway.
    Of course, those with professed 'Golden Ears' will differ, but many of them will also say that vinyl LP sounds better with its restricted dynamic range, pinch effect, tracking effects, etc.

    Just my 2d. (old British currency system).
    John.
    Author of MIDI tutorials at http://midi-tutor.proboards.com/index.cgi

  4. #4

    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    Quote Originally Posted by sururick View Post
    I was just curious to what people are using as sampling rates when composing. I am currently using a sample rate of 96KHZ 24 bit but I only ever make cds. Therefore, do you think it is best just to stick with 44Khz or 48Khz rather than the 96Khz? I am still trying to figure out if it really makes a difference since in the end it's just going to be 44Khz anyway.

    Regards,

    Richard
    It makes absolutely no sense to use 96KHz sample rate, as most devices have filters which just filter out those inaudible frequencies that would be recorded by using 96KHz.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Frank D's Avatar
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    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    Hi Richard and Guys ...

    I think what's more important is working at the highest possible bit-rate from music creation-through-mixing and mastering, then reducing it to 16-bit at the final rendering for audio CD.

    If you don't mix your music, or use effects plug-ins, then it doesn't matter. But you want to prevent multiple, accumulative "rounding-off" during all those stages I mentioned, keeping your file as high-quality as possible until you have to reduce the bit-rate for the CD.

    I use Sonar X1 at 32-bit/44.1k (I believe Randy does too). With storage capacity measured in terabytes now, I've never noticed a need to conserve midi or audio file sizes.

    Happy New Year!

    Frank
    Frank D'Erasmo
    FABD Music - Arrangements-Orchestrations
    All Styles ... Specializing in Jazz, Theater, Latin & Pop

    Garritan JaBB, GPO, CoMB, World, GAS, Stradivari Violin & GigaStudio. Sonar X2 Producer, Pro Tools, Performer & Finale.

  6. #6

    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    Thanks for all the feedback guys, this has been a question that has been rendering inside my mind for years. Since the beginning of my composing, I always thought the higher numbers made huge impact, so I have always set my sampling rate to 96khz. I recently purchased Sonar X3, but I don't use it because I still prefer the midi editing in Sonar 8.5. However, Sonar X3 comes with up to 64bit and 384Khz sampling rate. What kind of a composer/musician/producer would actually benefit from such a high sampling rate?

  7. #7

    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    Quote Originally Posted by sururick View Post
    Thanks for all the feedback guys, this has been a question that has been rendering inside my mind for years. Since the beginning of my composing, I always thought the higher numbers made huge impact, so I have always set my sampling rate to 96khz. I recently purchased Sonar X3, but I don't use it because I still prefer the midi editing in Sonar 8.5. However, Sonar X3 comes with up to 64bit and 384Khz sampling rate. What kind of a composer/musician/producer would actually benefit from such a high sampling rate?
    And you have it there in a nutshell "I always thought the higher numbers made huge impact"!

    It's called specmanship. We are conned into believing that higher numbers mean better sound.
    However our hearing is not constantly upgraded. It starts, if we're lucky, with a 20Hz to 20 kHz frequency range.
    The fundamentals of most orchestral instruments range from about 35Hz (lower is possible) to a litle over 4kHz.
    Then there are the overtones with diminishing volumes.
    This article explains it well: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Audio_frequency
    Our hearing range very rapidly deteriorates as we get older. I think, at 68, mine is now to about 6kHz.


    We start, again if we're lucky, with a dynamic range capability up to about 120dB being the threshold of pain.
    For 'normal' (orchestral) listening we need about a 95dB dynamic range.
    See this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_range

    Most high quality analogue to digital converters are unable to process much above a 20 bit signal anyway.
    Higher sampling rates allow higher frequencies to be captured, but if there's nothing there and we can't hear it anyway, what's the point?
    Greater bit depths allow a wider dynamic range. But there seems little point in creating a dynamic range of 144dB if we can't process it.

    Therefore if we stick to reproducing the audible range 20Hz to 20kHz (44.1 kHz sampling), remembering that there is little musical content (including instrument overtones or the hiss from cymbals) much above 15kHz (FM radio limit) and allow extra dynamic range during the mixing process to make sure the 'noise floor' is sufficiently low, hence 24 bit, we should find few problems, and give ourselves a lot more processing power available, and our recordings take up less physical storage space.

    Take a look too at the quality of the instrument samples. If they're only of 44.1 kHz 16 bit, we can't improve them by processing them at higher quality. On the basis that you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.

    Some are of higher quality but usually just 24 bit.

    My two cents worth.
    Regards,
    John.
    Author of MIDI tutorials at http://midi-tutor.proboards.com/index.cgi

  8. #8

    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    Like others, most of my work is destined for CD, so 44kHz seems to be the sweet spot for me. I've done a couple of pieces that wound up on DVD, but no one got on my case about the sample rate. Until now, I've not given it much more thought.
    Cheers,

    Kevin F..

    KM Frye- (SOCAN)
    Music Director- Four Seasons Musical Theatre- 2016

    Bella Vista Studios
    Canada

    GPO4, JABB3, Garritan World Inst, REAPER, Roland VS2480 DAW

  9. #9

    Re: What sampling rate do you use when creating music?

    44.1/16 bit

    unless it is for video then 48k.

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