• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Topic: Transcribing orchestral cues.

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Transcribing orchestral cues.

    sponsored links


    ***Advertisments***
    Since I\'m fairly new to the world of orchestration, I thought I would try and transcribe some orchestral cues. The first cue I chose was track #2 from Thomas Newman\'s \"The Shawshank Redemption\". The problem I\'m having is that the viola line frequently gets overshadowed by the orchestra especially when the horn section comes in. I\'m assuming that this is a fairly common problem (inner lines) when transcribing for orchestra. Any work-arounds, or do you make an educated guess at the viola line in those spots? Anyone do this for a living, offer any tips? Anyone who has already transcribed this cue or is interested, want to compare notes?

  2. #2

    Re: Transcribing orchestral cues.

    I\'ve never seen the movie, or heard the score, but is the problem just that it can\'t be heard or that the line it\'s playing can\'t be heard?

    I\'m not sure what you\'re trying to achieve, but if you\'re asking for what possible doubling would work, I would suggest horn or cello for the first choices. However, since you\'ve said that the horn is needed for something else, I\'d also suggest clarinet and bassoon, since either well reinforce the sound, but make it a little more mellow. Trumpet would also to work, to an extent, depending on the range of the passage in question.

    I don\'t know of any orchestrational forums or such, but I\'d look for \"Orchestration\" by Samuel Adler, Rimsky-Korsakov, or Walter Piston (or all three).

  3. #3

    Re: Transcribing orchestral cues.

    Russ apparently misunderstood you, but I understand what you\'re asking. There\'s not any real way to hear things in the mix if you just can\'t hear them.

    I\'m not really sure that transcribing is the way to learn orchestration, though. My suggestion would be to listen to the masters: Beethoven, Haydn, Handel, Rimsky-Korsakov, Stravinsky, and if you\'re interested in film music, Aaron Copland is a must. Then, get a hold of the scores for the pieces you\'re listening to. You should be able to find a lot in your public library, or a college library with a music program.

    Above all, though, LISTEN LISTEN LISTEN. Listen to what your ears are telling you, not what you\'re reading on the page. Orchestration is all about the shape of the piece, and how sections and instruments interact, not as much about a single line, as you are asking about.

    I would definitely lean toward \"Classical\" music more than film music, though. Remember that film music is meant to be background music. If you can orchestrate like Copland and Stravinsky, you\'ll have no trouble orchestrating like Thomas Newman. (And no, I\'m not disputing that Thomas Newman is a phenomenal composer.)

    Oh, and one more thing. Check out \"Principles of Orchestration\" by Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov. It\'s the only orchestration book I really like.

  4. #4

    Re: Transcribing orchestral cues.

    No takers eh? Could anyone suggest a newsgroup or forum for orchestration or orchestral film music?

  5. #5

    Re: Transcribing orchestral cues.

    Thanks for the advice Vertigo! [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] My reasoning for listening to film cues for orchestration, was that I know orchestration and instrumentation is varied for film music than the classical repertoire. I.e., in classical music you would never see more than four horns, etc., but in film music it is common to see more, same with woodwinds. Anyway, maybe I\'m just going about it the wrong way. I will definitely take your suggestion check out more printed scores and listen!

  6. #6

    Re: Transcribing orchestral cues.

    Originally posted by surfmonkey:
    Thanks for the advice Vertigo! [img]images/icons/smile.gif[/img] My reasoning for listening to film cues for orchestration, was that I know orchestration and instrumentation is varied for film music than the classical repertoire. I.e., in classical music you would never see more than four horns, etc., but in film music it is common to see more, same with woodwinds. Anyway, maybe I\'m just going about it the wrong way. I will definitely take your suggestion check out more printed scores and listen!
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Not necessarily so. Listen to the late romantics like Mahler, Wagner, and Richard Strauss. They often employ more than 4 horns (upwards to 10 as in Mahler\'s 3rd), and they often use larger woodwind sections as well. They\'re also incredible orchestrators. Also check out Ravel and Debussy. The instrumentations tend to be a bit lighter with these two, but the orchestration is in no way inferior. Quite the opposite.

  7. #7

    Re: Transcribing orchestral cues.

    Thanks for straightening me out Mahler. I have much to learn. [img]images/icons/grin.gif[/img]

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •