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Topic: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

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  1. #1

    A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

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    I recently finished a film project edited in Vegas which I then imported a 48khz 24 bit wav file, which was music exported out of cubase sx. My problem is that the audio sounds fine on my computer after I render the project to DVD mpeg-2 standards and even when watching the DVD on my PC. But, when I play the DVD on a home consumer player the audio is really faint. I end up having to turn the TV volume all the way up and still have a low signal.

    Now, I am still a novice at audio engineering and obviously that subject could take up many books, I just need some advice from someone about DVD audio encoding setup. I followed the NTSC DVD Architect template in Vegas for rendering the project and included the audio in the render but when I load the rendered project into DVD Architect it says it has to compress the audio. I thought the audio I was using was compatible and didn\'t need to be compressed?

    Also, I am not exactly sure what if any processing I need to add to the music track. Actually for this project all it has is music for the audio, no dialog or sound effects. Should I run compression on the audio? What level should I mix at? And any other adice for mixing to DVD would be really appreciated.

    Thanks,

    Edward Trevino

  2. #2

    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    I\'m not a Vegas owner, but I have a couple thoughts.

    First, about the compression conundrum. \"Compression\" I think refers to essentially re-encoding the audio to a format that a DVD player can read. That may be what DVD Architect is doing.

    As for the audio level problem, I\'m wondering about a possible problem with stereo vs. surround mixing. I don\'t know. Are you running regular stereo sound on both the computer and the consumer DVD playback?
    O.

  3. #3

    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    This is a bit of a long shot and I\'m on a Mac using different tools but...

    If a DVD has a 5.1 soundtrack a DVD Player might need to collapse that down to stereo if the DVD is being played through a stereo TV for example. If the 5.1 audio is normalised it will distort like hell when collapsed to stereo, 6 into 2 doesn\'t go!!!!

    What your DVD creation software might be doing is allowing for this and turning your mix down so it doesn\'t distort. However, it doesn\'t need to do this because you have a stereo mix I assume and not a 5.1 mix.

    As I said it\'s a long shot but...

  4. #4

    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    I use Vegas for audio & video production and DVD-A and I love it. I pity the guys I watch using Avid now..

    Anyway, the instructions are flawed about 48khz 16 bit audio not needing to be recompressed. You need to create an AC-3 audio mix instead. (that is what DVD-A is doing) You can choose between stereo or 5.1 also so just mix your audio down to AC-3 \"stereo\" and it won\'t recompress it. This may help the audio quality a bit as well.

    You can only get the signal as hot as you can without it clipping. Try to get the audio as loud as possible without the red clipping indicators going off in the main mixing channels. If that is not hot enough on your TV, then you would need to compress & maximize in some way to get the percieved loudness up enough.

    Here is a link to a DVD mix I did. It plays loud enough on my home TV and at the Frys store home theater systems. It was done in Vegas Video.

    www.davidgovett.com/QLSO
    grab the film opening mix tune.

    Good luck. Hope this helps. Vegas is one of my main axes now and I have just cracked the surface of it.

    David Govett

  5. #5

    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    Thanks everyone for the replies...I am going to mix the audio to the AC-3 and see if that helps. And David, I totally agree with you...Vegas is amazing! Everyone at my film school is Mac and Avid crazed...Yet all they had were problems. Othern than this small audio problem my project went flawless through Vegas.

  6. #6

    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    this may be way old school, but have you checked the phase coherance of your signal? if your tv is bouncing the signal down to mono and the signal is really out of phase, you\'ll sometimes get a very faint signal. I heard a DVD once that had the entire guitar and bass tracks cancelled whenver the stereo went to mono.

    -dev

  7. #7

    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    Funny you mention that...I had the professor of an audio for video and film class suggest the same problem...I\'ll have to look into that.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: A question about audio mixing for a film to DVD project...

    Originally posted by David Govett:

    Anyway, the instructions are flawed about 48khz 16 bit audio not needing to be recompressed. You need to create an AC-3 audio mix instead. (that is what DVD-A is doing)
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">You can also master in DVD-A to 48/16. You just need to alter the Audio Settings on the Disc Optimization dialog (at the very bottom) to PCM rather than the AC-3 settings. I mix almost all of mine to PCM rather than AC-3.

    Edward: Unless you do have a phase problem, I\'d bet that you need to do some mastering on your audio with a Peak Limiter. Is Wave Hammer still bundled with Vegas? That will do the trick. I like Waves L2, myself, but whatever the tool, you just need to knock off any non-contributing peaks so you can hoist up the entire level hotter without clipping.

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