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Topic: So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

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  1. #1

    So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

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    Am I correct in assuming that all the Classical compositions of the past from all the great composers are in the public domain and up for grabs by anyone who wants to record and publish their own version of them? If so, where exactly in chronology are works still protected by Copyrights? Are early 20th century compositions protected?

  2. #2

    Re: So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

    I *believe* anything from 1904 and earlier is fair game, but I could be (and probably am) wrong...

  3. #3

    Re: So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

    I think this table is pretty accurate:

    http://www.unc.edu/~unclng/public-d.htm

  4. #4

    Re: So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

    Interesting to see how copyright laws changed over the years. I guess copyright rules didn\'t exist prior to 1923...

  5. #5

    Re: So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

    I believe you have to wait 70 years after the composer\'s death to be able to freely use the music.
    What messes things up is that some countries have an extention for the years during which the 2nd world war was going on. Some other countries (including the USA i believe) do not recognize these war years for an extention.

  6. #6

    Re: So, are all Classical compositions of the past in the public domain?

    Originally posted by TC5:
    Interesting to see how copyright laws changed over the years. I guess copyright rules didn\'t exist prior to 1923...
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yes they did, they just didn\'t stretch into perpetuity as they do now. I believe copyrights were originally awarded for 14 years and could be renewed for an additional 14, or 28 total.

    The laws began to change in the 20th century as Congress began to continually extend copyright periods.

    Here\'s some more interesting links re: copyright, PD, etc.

    http://www.themorningnews.org/archives/editorial/copyrights_and_wrongs.php
    http://www.pdinfo.com/copyrt.htm

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