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Topic: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

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  1. #1

    F. Chopin. Prelude in e

    Arrangement for 3 Omnisphere patches.
    F.Chopin.Prelude in e

    Thank you for finding time to listen.
    Last edited by sfiks; 05-28-2016 at 10:45 AM. Reason: spelling
    sfiks

  2. #2
    Senior Member tedvanya's Avatar
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    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    In order to comment and appreciate your work, it would help us to know what samples you are using, and what what is your system.
    The idea of orchestrating this beautiful piece of CHOPIN, is great, and you have some interesting ways of doing it.
    Please let us know your details, then we may be able to offer constructive criticisms and help to make your work sound better.

    Welcome here,

    Ted

  3. #3

    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    There is no samples, Ted. Omnisphere was used in Synth Mode. All 3 parts are based on Saw waveform.
    Quote Originally Posted by tedvanya View Post
    Welcome here,

    Ted
    Thank you, I try not to bother the forum with my "opuses"

    Slava

  4. #4

    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    I am sorry to be brutally frank, but the fluttering, agitated synthesizer sound throughout the entire piece is overbearing and makes this listener a bit nervous. Perhaps if you used this effect much more sparingly the change would be beneficial.

    I don't know what your nationality is but in English-speaking countries we spell it "Chopin".


    My comments are meant in the spirit of being helpful.

    Larry Alexander

  5. #5

    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    Quote Originally Posted by larryalex1 View Post
    I am sorry to be brutally frank, but the fluttering, agitated synthesizer sound throughout the entire piece is overbearing and makes this listener a bit nervous. Perhaps if you used this effect much more sparingly the change would be beneficial.

    I don't know what your nationality is but in English-speaking countries we spell it "Chopin".


    My comments are meant in the spirit of being helpful.

    Larry Alexander
    Thank you, Larry, (and Ted, of course) for the "Chopin"! My bad
    As for pulsating part - that was the main idea. It's a pity it didn't work for you.

    Slava

  6. #6

    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    No, it didn't "work" for me and my guess is that it didn't "work" for most of the people who have heard it.

    I have been composing music for around seventy years. I have an extensive background in music theory, harmony, counterpoint, etc. Please allow me to give you a lesson in Music 101.

    When a piece contains the same unchanging, relentless background from beginning to end, it tends to cause the listener's brain to scream, "Change...change! Do something different in the accompaniment! Vary the instrumentation, perhaps. Do something!" Variety is the spice of life and music. Can't you understand that?

    My comments are intended as constructive criticism. I hope that you will accept it as such.

    Regards,

    Larry Alexander

  7. #7
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    Well, my opinion is that Chopin's piano music was written for and exploits the piano. It does not translate well to other instruments. Bach can be played on any instrument with the appropriate range, but Chopin's music demands the piano.

    Richard

  8. #8

    Re: F. Shopin. Prelude in e

    Not being much of a Chopin aficionado (although I do like some of his music very much), I can't comment on how well this Prelude translates in such an arrangement. That being said, I do find it interesting, and well done. Richard may be right, "Switched On Chopin" may not work as well as that seminal work by Wendy Carlos, when she synthesized Bach. And then Tomita came out with "Snowflakes Are Dancing" and his hugely successful 'Planets.' I thought the Debussy piece (snowflakes) did come off well , and that was based on a Prelude, so I see no reason why this can't work in theory. Perhaps some more percussive sounds would be helpful? It does sound quite distant from the piano. Listen to the Prelude. Get the feel of what mood Chopin was trying to create in the listener. Then perhaps make some changes in the instrumentation to reflect that? I also think a slightly slower tempo, and softer dynamics would help

    Cheers Michael D

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