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Topic: Hardware Mixing Desks - what's the point these days?

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  1. #1

    Hardware Mixing Desks - what\'s the point these days?

    I run a midi studio and since I sent it up, my poor old 16 track analogue desk is just sitting gathering huge quanities of dust.

    With all the mixing capabilities of computer software, what exactly are people using hardware desks for? Mackie and other companies are still churning them out. Are they catering for the live concert market?

    Cheers
    Heath

  2. #2

    Re: Hardware Mixing Desks - what\'s the point these days?

    a lot of people will tell you that analogue summing is far superior to what happens inside the computer, especially with high track counts. it gives you better imaging and a wider stereo image. an engineer friend of mine would never consider doing a mix inside the computer-he always wants to run as many outs as possible thru an analogue board.

    however, i\'ve also heard it said that in order for it to really make a difference, you need a pretty high quality board.

  3. #3

    Re: Hardware Mixing Desks - what\'s the point these days?

    The live market certainly needs mixers. I use my 1402 for monitoring and routing. I can mix my two computers\' outs as well as keyboard, bass, guitar, electronic drums and CD player to the speakers. No cables to move. I can also select and mix any combination to the input of my main audio PC. I don\'t have to touch a single wire.

    That said, I do my mixes in the PC. The Mackie is just there to control what goes to my speakers and to my recording inputs. And to control levels. If anything is too loud it\'s great to just reach up and pull it down. I can\'t imagine having to reach for the mouse while my speakers are melting my ears.

  4. #4

    Re: Hardware Mixing Desks - what\'s the point these days?

    Originally posted by John DeBorde:

    however, i\'ve also heard it said that in order for it to really make a difference, you need a pretty high quality board.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Yep. If you only have a cheap console I wouldn\'t advice it. Only if you have a warm sounding console like an SSL or even something that comes near, although those desks are reeeeaaally expensive.

  5. #5

    Re: Hardware Mixing Desks - what\'s the point these days?

    Originally posted by Not Dudley Simpson:
    I run a midi studio and since I sent it up, my poor old 16 track analogue desk is just sitting gathering huge quanities of dust.

    With all the mixing capabilities of computer software, what exactly are people using hardware desks for? Mackie and other companies are still churning them out. Are they catering for the live concert market?

    Cheers
    Heath
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">I have a Sony DMXr100. I\'ve still got a few hardware synths hardwired into the thing.

    Also, it\'s got fabulous mic pres, A/D converters, and great dsp (the compressors, limiters and eq will smoke any plug in). I\'ve thought of the mixerless studio many times, but a good mixer is just so convenient.

    Ed

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