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Topic: Could someone kindly explain a "C score"?

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  1. #1

    Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    Hi, Im reading the book \"the SCORE\" by Michael Schelle. In his interview with Shirley Walker, she mentions that most people in Hollywood tend to use a \"C score\" as it is more flexible because film changes are happening so fast, things getting changed at the last minute.

    She does also state that a transposing score is cheaper because orchestrators dont get paid for that, copyists do....?

    Could someone perhaps enlighten me? Thanks [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/wink.gif[/img]

  2. #2

    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    Transposed scores make my brain hurt.

  3. #3

    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    [ QUOTE ]
    Hi Scott,

    Conductor\'s score is written in the exact pitch that the instrument plays. If the key of the piece is C major, for instance, none of the parts on the Conductor\'s score have any key signatures.



    [/ QUOTE ]

    I\'m confuuuhuhuhuhuhuhused!!!!

    Does this mean that if a trumpet part is for a Bb trumpet, then the key signature on the trumpet score would be Bb, even if the piece is in Eb?

    When WOULD a C-major score have key signatures?
    I mean, it\'s in C-major, it has no flats or sharps.

  4. #4

    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    I hear ya. Get a Prokofiev score. All C scores.

  5. #5

    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    [ QUOTE ]


    Does this mean that if a trumpet part is for a Bb trumpet, then the key signature on the trumpet score would be Bb, even if the piece is in Eb?


    [/ QUOTE ]

    No, it means that if the piece is in Eb Major, every single staff will have 3 flats.

    Get it? All pitches will be as notated, non-transposed. So it\'s easy to see the relationship between all the instruments, ie. voicings, doublings, etc.

  6. #6

    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    Hi, my question was almost identical to Michael\'s, I was typing a reply and the forum shut down for a little while. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/frown.gif[/img] I too am confused. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/crazy.gif[/img] [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    An English Horn for example, sounds a perfect fifth lower than written, so does that mean anyone playing a transposing intrumentalist has to mentally transpose what they are playing on the fly?

  7. #7
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    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    There are some transposing instruments in orchestral instruments.
    \"Transposing instruments\" mean that their written pitch and sounding pitch is different.

    Clarinet, Trumpet, English Horn and French Horn are common \"non-octave\" transposing instruments.
    Piccolo, Double Bass, Celesta, Glockenspiel, and contra Bassoon are common \"octave\" transposing instruments.

    C score is the score every instruments except octave transpocing isntruments are written using sounding pitch.

    When copyiest make part score from Transposed full score, only thing they have to do is just copying. However, if the score is C score, they have to transpose for those \"transposing instrument\" to get correct sounds.

    I personally like to see transposed full score, because that\'s what the players see. Since I play lots of instruments, it is easy for me to play instruments if my score is already transposed.

    These things are technical. One should use C score, if it realizes his/her idea faster and easier.
    It is nice if one can do both well.

  8. #8
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    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    For example...

    One write music for Flute, Clarinet in Bb that is \"concert C maj\". And both play concert middle C as a first note (dynamics is PPP by the way).

    If the full score is C socre, You don\'t see any key signiture, and you should see 2 middle C.
    If the full socre is transcosed, you see no key signiture and middle C on flute and you see 2 sharp (D maj) as keysigniture and middle D on clarinet part.

    Regardless the composer uses C score or transposed score, I, as a clarinet player, should have my clarinet part score in D maj and middle D is the first pitch. If I get a clarinet part with no keysigniture and middle C as the first note, I will quicky run to the composer and ask \"so, you want clarinet in C, right?\" or \"are you a beginner? [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/cool.gif[/img]\"

  9. #9

    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    Thanks everyone, and thank you Ken, you explained that very well.

    My final question is, for those playing a non-octave transposing instrument, (as mentioned above) do these players then need to mentally transpose on the fly? Wouldnt this put some musicians at a disadvantage?

    If the orchestra has never seen the piece before it seems reasonable to assume that the Clarinet, Trumpet, English Horn and French Horn players would take a little longer to learn it. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

  10. #10
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    Re: Could someone kindly explain a \"C score\"?

    [ QUOTE ]
    Thanks everyone, and thank you Ken, you explained that very well.

    My final question is, for those playing a non-octave transposing instrument, (as mentioned above) do these players then need to mentally transpose on the fly? Wouldnt this put some musicians at a disadvantage?

    If the orchestra has never seen the piece before it seems reasonable to assume that the Clarinet, Trumpet, English Horn and French Horn players would take a little longer to learn it. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]

    [/ QUOTE ]

    The players ALWAYS see transposed score.

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