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Topic: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    It\'s been quite a while and I am trying to re-understand which voice(s) in part writing are best to double. Now, I know never double a 7th or an altered tone because of special resolving needs, but which voices in four-part harmony is best doubled? [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/confused.gif[/img]
    Never mind - I think I\'ve found the answer(s). [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

  2. #2

    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    That was easy! haha. And remember, rules are meant to be broken!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    Not so fast partner! Something isn\'t working out right. Any insight would be greatly respected.
    By the way, is that a Musicman or Schecter Studio?

  4. #4
    PatS
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    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    If you give me a specific example, I can help. Doublings are context dependent (i.e., based on voice leading) and therefore need not follow the \"rules\" to the letter. Nonetheless, here are few common-practice \"guidelines\" to consider, as regards writing triads in four parts:

    Root Position: double the bass (root)
    First Inversion: double the 3rd or 6th above the bass (5th or root), unless the 6th is the root of a diminished triad
    Second Inversion: double the bass (5th)

    If you\'re interested, here are three tables that tally the doubling \"rules\" according to several music theorists and composers:

    Root-Position Triads

    First-Inversion Triads

    Second-Inversion Triads

    Pat

    P.S. In a previous life, I taught tonal and post-tonal music theory and composition at Yale (as a grad student) and UC Santa Barbara (as a lecturer).

  5. #5
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    Hey thanks Pat. I studied theory in college in the early 90\'s but since then need to brush up. We\'re talking bass here right? What about the SAT parts?
    Thanks for the info!

    Oh, OK. I just went up on those links and copied them for later study. I see, I see, I can see clearly now the key has gone!
    I can see all accidentals in my way!
    It\'s gonna be a bright, bright, part writing day! [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img]

    Charts are interesting thanks!


    You may attach a file to this post while editing.
    Oh no not you again! I thought I told you I don\'t have a file just a BHSH!

  6. #6

    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    Looks like someone posted some helpful links for you.


    The bass in my avatar is my Tobias Growler.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/ooo.gif[/img] Awesome!

  8. #8
    PatS
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    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    [ QUOTE ]
    Hey thanks Pat. I studied theory in college in the early 90\'s but since then need to brush up. We\'re talking bass here right? What about the SAT parts?

    [/ QUOTE ]

    Don\'t be confused by my \"double the bass\" or \"above the bass\" comments; that\'s just \"figured-bass\" talk. You could just as easily think of doubling in terms of the chord tones (root, 3rd and 5th), which I placed in parentheses.

    Maybe a simple example will help. Start with a G-major tonic triad; move to the subdominant in first inversion, then to a cadential-6/4, then to a dominant-seventh (7th as a passing tone), and back to the tonic:

    S: B-C-D-D-C-B
    A: G-G-G-F#--G*
    T: D-C-B-A----G
    B: G-E-D-D----G

    (* can also be a D)

    All of the root-position triads and the 6/4 chord double the bass--i.e., the root of the chord. The IV6 chord doubles the 3rd above the bass--also the root of the chord. The final tonic triples the root, in lieu of the alto dropping to the 5th (a common motion for inner voices).

    If I created a deceptive cadence (i.e., ended on an E-minor triad), I could just as easily double the third (G) as I could the root (E). In fact, if the example were in G minor, doubling the 3rd of the VI chord (Eb major) would be desirable, unless you like your altos to sing augmented seconds (F#-Eb).

    Bear in mind that this is a textbook example. If you play any of J.S. Bach\'s chorale harmonizations, you\'ll discover he\'s all over the place with regard to spacing, doubling, voice overlapping, voice crossing, etc.

    Pat

  9. #9
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Doubling - Part writing 4 voices.

    Yes Yes Yes! Good example. [img]/ubbthreads/images/graemlins/smile.gif[/img]I see! I have a book on all J.S. Bach chorale\'s and yes you\'re right.
    Thanks again,

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