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Topic: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

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  1. #1

    Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

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    Howdy all!

    What has best helped you develop your musical sense? Ear training, counterpoint, theory?

    For the benefit of all, if all who read this post would give a few words as to how they developed their musicality, I think it would be a terrific benefit to all of us.

    As for myself, I've been revisiting ear training from the aspect of how each tone relates to the tonal center as opposed to learning intervals, etc. While I have yet to reap the benefits of this training, I think I'm on the right track to developing my ear.

  2. #2

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    actually you ask a fairly profound question, may seem simple on the surface but in the time i have spent thinking about it, i am still completely perplexed by it, just my opinions follow

    John Cage 4 min 33 sec

    for me his concepts here open up the universe as Aural stimulus any sound can follow any sound in any order etc

    Messian Bird Song

    some how related to Cage in a way for me at least again for the same reasons

    Jazz Improvisation

    the concept of conceiving music instantaneously, that is composing on ones feet

    Musical Compostion:

    looking at musical composition and composers both from the Macro, that is musical history and observing its growth, and the micro entering the sound world of each composer

    and in the end, the ear has an infinite possible realtionship to the self, that is it can focus in an unlimited way to sound stimuls, example cultural symbols

    and must not forget probably the most important, PHILOSOPHY

    Religion: the need for meaning

  3. #3

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    I've had a tremendous ear my whole life. The first time I sat at a piano, when I was 5, I organized tones into chords and created a melody around it. There was this inherent logic to the spaces on a piano and the resulting tones. I was also born with perfect pitch.

    I wish that recognizing such a gift at such a young age would've been a sign of things to come but, alas, it was actually the largest hinderance to my musical education. I could never really get beyond the deep-seeded desire to hear what I imagined hearing and it took years before I could actually write something that I didn't hear first.

    So I've spent my life reading up on theory and practicing composition, but I didn't get really serious about form until 3 years ago when I started composing for the game company I worked at.

    Now I feel like a second-rate hack composer. All those years with this special gift and my music still sounds like orchestral variations of pop music. My music lacks sophistication, complexity, and good form.

    But I still go on. I'm still buying libraries and working on music. I owe it to myself, even now, to make the best music that I can.

    So, all you youngins out there. Discipline. DISCIPLINE DSCIPLINE DISCIPLINE!!!! Don't cut yourself short by not learning correctly the first time.
    Michael Peter

    If music be the food of love...
    play on

    William Shakespeare

    homepage

  4. #4

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    Quote Originally Posted by His Frogness
    I've had a tremendous ear my whole life. The first time I sat at a piano, when I was 5, I organized tones into chords and created a melody around it. There was this inherent logic to the spaces on a piano and the resulting tones. I was also born with perfect pitch.

    I wish that recognizing such a gift at such a young age would've been a sign of things to come but, alas, it was actually the largest hinderance to my musical education. I could never really get beyond the deep-seeded desire to hear what I imagined hearing and it took years before I could actually write something that I didn't hear first.

    So I've spent my life reading up on theory and practicing composition, but I didn't get really serious about form until 3 years ago when I started composing for the game company I worked at.

    Now I feel like a second-rate hack composer. All those years with this special gift and my music still sounds like orchestral variations of pop music. My music lacks sophistication, complexity, and good form.

    But I still go on. I'm still buying libraries and working on music. I owe it to myself, even now, to make the best music that I can.

    So, all you youngins out there. Discipline. DISCIPLINE DSCIPLINE DISCIPLINE!!!! Don't cut yourself short by not learning correctly the first time.
    Michael,

    By "learning correctly the first time", what do you mean? What approach would you recommend?

  5. #5

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    its interesting so far just how are politics and creative process are related

    reading Erns response made me compare Michaels, Erns and my post
    and it seems consistent with our politics, so how we approach the creative process is related to the political spectrum

  6. #6
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    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    I think I've learned the most by listening.

    Since Jr. High School when I joined my first band, I have had this ability to really concentrate on whatever I was interested in musically.

    So I would listen and dissect whatever it was in order to understand how it was put together.

    Good Question. Hard to answer with surity, though.

  7. #7

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    Quote Originally Posted by wes37
    Michael,

    By "learning correctly the first time", what do you mean? What approach would you recommend?
    I'm finding it tremendously hard to convey this idea Growing up, I didn't have a sequencer or anything of the sort. Everything I wrote was for piano. I didn't "compose" music for composition's sake, I wrote for the personal satisfaction of creating something beautiful on the piano. I could play you some things I've written on the piano that you would swear came from someone who knew what they were doing (example)and I do to some degree (the example I just recorded live before posting this), but writing this way will not allow you to develop things like form and orchestration.

    I would recommend to always compose as an exercise of applying a certain technique that broadens your experience. Expressing yourself is one aspect of composing, but the main focus should be on expanding your knowledge of what music is in terms of tonality, orchestration and form.

    If I had studied and comprehended the theory that I've absorbed in the last 5 years, 20 years ago, I'd be a much better composer today than I currently am. Many people say that it should primarily be something you enjoy and that you should find your own "voice". I agree that you should find your voice, but you'll always be limited by your vocabulary, and experience in applying concepts that the great composers of history used will greatly increase your vocabulary.

    I think this applies especially to those that have a musical gift. It's not something you are going to shake, and considering you've got a few years to hang around, you might as well do something with it. It's entirely my opinion.
    Michael Peter

    If music be the food of love...
    play on

    William Shakespeare

    homepage

  8. #8

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    I'd say the continued experience of playing with other musicians in orchestras and ensembles and keeping a certain 9 to 5 discipline are the two things that have helped me the most.
    Trev Parks

  9. #9

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    Quote Originally Posted by His Frogness
    . I could play you some things I've written on the piano that you would swear came from someone who knew what they were doing (example)and I do to some degree (the example I just recorded live before posting this), but writing this way will not allow you to develop things like form and orchestration.

    If I had studied and comprehended the theory that I've absorbed in the last 5 years, 20 years ago, I'd be a much better composer today than I currently am. Many people say that it should primarily be something you enjoy and that you should find your own "voice". I agree that you should find your voice, but you'll always be limited by your vocabulary, and experience in applying concepts that the great composers of history used will greatly increase your vocabulary.
    Very nice piece! I agree that it is helpful to apply theory to practice to develop one's vocabulary.

    I swear it sounds like you know what you're doing.

  10. #10

    Re: Developing one's musicality-Opinions?

    I think one of the most important aspects of developing one's musicality is learning from people who are better musicians than you. This is not simply listening to concerts and recordings, or studying scores of the great composers--it's actually looking for the opportunity to work with better players than you, or to conduct an ensemble of high caliber musicians...anything that requires you to hit the woodshed, to research, to expand your horizons.

    Music school is perhaps the easiest way to get those sorts of opportunities (at least when it comes to "art" music: classical and jazz), but I have also learned a huge amount from musicians in other arenas: rock bands, church, the internet, etc.

    It's not always comfortable, but in my opinion one of the best ways to grow as a player is to stretch yourself to to your limits. Each time you do this, you find that your limits have receded a little.

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