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Topic: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

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  1. #1

    My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

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    I really liked the scene where the mother that lost her son in Iraq goes to Washington with Michael Moore. She starts a conversation with a very strange woman who has camped out in front of the White house and also claims to have lost a son. Another woman walks by, sees the cameras, and decides to get involved. She exclaims "This is staged, you didn't lose a son!" But the mother has lost her son. We know that for a fact. The doubting woman proceeds to grill her with zeal and confidence ,"What's your son's name, where was he stationed?" The mother answers and convinces the doubting woman, who then backs off and walks away in shock.

    This is what should happen in America when the evidence against Bush is presented. But it does not. I made the case against Bush to a Republican from Montana recently. In the end, he had no defense for Bush, but he said, "You're right, but I just feel more comfortable with the Republicans. They have my religious view." He is also the owner of 5 guns and hates Michael moore, ofcourse. This is what we are up against. If a recording surfaced, that proved the worst about Bush, he'd still get 45% of the vote. Why? because people are stubborn, just like me. I know for a fact that Bush is bad and completely dishonest. But Republicans know the opposite to be true. The attraction of being part of a club is too strong. They will never admit that they are wrong, because it would mean that everything they understand about the world is wrong. It's similar to the way that parents will deny that their kids are doing drugs until the evidence is too overwhelming. It's really quite hopeless.

  2. #2

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    Dear Hopeless,
    So, your world is ruined by people who are stubborn and don't agree with you and who aren't going to change their mind despite the fact that you are positively sure you are right.

    I think the idea is you either learn to live with other people and accept that they are different and hold different views than you do, or..find some place else you can live with like minded people.

    Perhaps if you are unsucessful in changing everyone in this country and getting them to see the light...you can buy your own island or something and start your own country?

    Then you can run it as you see fit. And make everybody think, and believe the way you do...you know..the right way_no pun intended. You'd never have to put up with all the wrong minded people again. And you'd all agree on everything.

    Wouldn't that just be great? uuuhg.

  3. #3

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    I embrace diversity in every respect. I just don't like it when millions of people support the killing of 50,000 people, based on lies. I don't like it that Bush might get re-elected, simply because his supporters have no idea what he is really up to. I don't care that many people are against abortion or against afirmative action etc... That's everyone's right. but I believe we have a right to the truth.

    Signed, Hopeless.

  4. #4

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    exactly Nick, why do you think i cracked up over that Reagan post, here is someone responsible for death squads in Central America and all you guys are having a rational civil discussion about not hurting anyones feelings !!! just to much for my sensibilities, especially when i could see that he was being used in death as in life to further the conservative cause, and why is it Americans do not even entertain the very thought that their leaders are war criminals, i am simply dumbfounded, no other leader in any other country with the exception of Israel could get away with what your leaders get away with, and i have to say it , the blood of other people is worthless , thats why that women reacted the way she did, not hard to understand just read any posts by Brady , Wes , frog Xanax , and others and you can see exactly where it comes from.

    i ask lets reverse the situation , i wonder what would happen if it was 50,000 Americans dead in Iraq, it would be totally inconceivable to have santions on an American city in the same way they were imposed on Iraq , these are thoughts you are simply not allowed to have, they are censured from consciousness because the blood of a white man is worth much more than anyone elses, that is why in death white leaders are glorified, it is just taken for granted that America is on the side of justice and everyone else who apposes has to be exterminated or treated like dogs or like Palestinians

  5. #5

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    It has nothing to do with being or not being white. We did this kind of rubbish just as readily in Yugoslavia.

  6. #6

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    Quote Originally Posted by charles
    . . .the blood of a white man is worth much more than anyone elses, that is why in death white leaders are glorified, it is just taken for granted that America is on the side of justice and everyone else who apposes has to be exterminated or treated like dogs or like Palestinians
    So, Martin Luther King Jr. was a white man?


    I don't think the majority of Americans in this day and age are that racist, Charles. Not even in goverment.

  7. #7

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    That scene was interesting to me, Nick, because we were in the exact same spot just a few days later (judging from the trees, which were blossoming when we were there) and saw that woman who camps there.

    I agree that seeing that woman really brought it all down to human terms. And that's why I think it's important that everyone see the movie, even if they're conservative and don't like Michael Moore.

    My wife is writing him to suggest that he edit a version that kids can see. It wouldn't take much.

  8. #8

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    Quote Originally Posted by Nick Batzdorf
    My wife is writing him to suggest that he edit a version that kids can see. It wouldn't take much.
    I don't think there's a thing in this movie that kids -- at least older kids -- couldn't see.

    As for the scene in question, Nick P. forgets to add that, as the woman who lost her son is walking away in grief and anger, the abusive woman yells out something like, "Don't blame Bush, blame Al Queda!" about her son's death.

    Just more proof of the ignorance of some Bush supporters. Those who have allowed themselves to buy into the lies promoted by the Bush Admin that Iraq and Al Queda are/were somehow tied together.

    I'll be the first to admit that I blubbered like a baby through parts of this movie. It's extremely powerful.

  9. #9

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    Quote Originally Posted by robh
    So, Martin Luther King Jr. was a white man?
    No, according to charles, MLK was "approriated" by the white establishment. Whatever... it's self reinforcing and unfalsifiable. If facts surface proving charles wrong, then we just say that that's an exception that was "appropriated" by the white establishment.

  10. #10

    Re: My Favorite Scene from Fahrenheit 911

    Quote Originally Posted by robgb
    I don't think there's a thing in this movie that kids -- at least older kids -- couldn't see.
    It depends on the kid. I took mine (12-1/2, 14, nearly 17). My oldest boy was fine with it. My youngest boy was born to be an emergency room surgeon - nothing grosses him out. He's naturally curious about the inner workings of the body. He agreed that the scenes were terrible, but he was glad that he saw the film.

    My 14-year-old daughter was another story. She sobbed through the last 45 minutes. She's very compassionate - yet as a teenager she has a very small world and prefers her head in the sand. She was angry that I had brought her. (My wife didn't come. She's at her sister's place helping with cancer care.)

    Afterwards my daughter and oldest boy had a heart to heart talk about her experience. It was really heartwarming and transformative. I hate what my daughter saw, but I think that she will grow from the experience.

    My warning to all of those who are sensitive to seeing death and injuries, or who are prone to nightmares, is to shield your eyes once the setting moves to the ground in Iraq. The audio is enough to impart the tragedy of the scenes. The video is too much for many of us.

    -Jon Fairhurst

    "It's not just politics. It's a matter of life and death."

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