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Topic: Ear Training Books

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  1. #1

    Ear Training Books

    Hey guys, I'm trying to train my ear a little (ok, a lot) better. Can any of you recommend some good ear training books? Thanks.
    Tim

  2. #2
    Senior Member CString's Avatar
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    Re: Ear Training Books

    Quote Originally Posted by tgfoo
    Hey guys, I'm trying to train my ear a little (ok, a lot) better. Can any of you recommend some good ear training books? Thanks.
    Music for Sight Singing; Robert Ottman.
    Me fail English? That's unpossible.

  3. #3

    Re: Ear Training Books

    Hearing and Writing Music: Professional Training for Today's Musician by Ron Gorow

  4. #4

    Re: Ear Training Books

    Hi

    Try the "Modus Novus" (Author:Lars Edlund). It has a wide array of XXth century examples for atonal singing. Have fun!

  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Re: Ear Training Books

    Could these books be used to train someone to enjoy normal/ popular music?........Just wondering.......

    I was thinking of giving someone a free gift......

    Frank

  6. #6

    Re: Ear Training Books

    I have one...I'll bring it out of my office this week and let you know the title, author. Good luck!

  7. #7

    Re: Ear Training Books

    If you really want to train your ear, the best way to do it is by transcribing. There are lots of devices/programs that will slow audio down for you without losing pitch. Start by transcribing the bass and work your way up.
    There's a quick book for you.
    Mark

  8. #8

    Re: Ear Training Books

    As I remember back, I used the Bruce Benward ear training books, among others, at both the U of Miami and U of Wisconsin. I'm certain there are many good books available on the subject. Get a book that comes with an Audio CD or midi files since you will want to learn to sing from written music as well as transcibe, as Neo stated, from played music. Matching sound with music notation and notation concepts is a very usefull skill to have. Best of luck.

    http://www.mhhe.com/socscience/music/benward/

  9. #9

    Re: Ear Training Books

    Thanks for the replies guys. All of you pretty much recommended somethign different. Amazon also has a bunch of differen books. Guess I read all of the reviews and then try and choose one or two of them. Thanks.
    Tim

  10. #10

    Re: Ear Training Books

    Quote Originally Posted by NeoDavinci
    If you really want to train your ear, the best way to do it is by transcribing. There are lots of devices/programs that will slow audio down for you without losing pitch. Start by transcribing the bass and work your way up.
    There's a quick book for you.
    Mark
    ------
    I would not totally agree witht hat.
    Transcribing is just ONE side of ear training, not the simplest, and it is not a METHOD of making your ear understand the sounds which dive into it.
    I think the most useful starting question is : what do you want to specifically develop/enhance ? Rythm, harmony, melody ?
    Transcribing a score is IMO trying to do all those at once which, based on your current level, may lead only to frustration and confusion.
    So if I was you, I'd first askedmyself a few questions, like :
    - Do I easily recognize the tone functions within a tonality ?
    - Do I have you a hard time, when I listen to a rythmic pattern, trying to guess what duration values are involved ?
    - Do I easily recognize a chord family, inversions, etc...
    - Can I physically sing the intervals I theorically know ?
    ----
    Depending on the answers, the areas to work, and the strategy may be different.
    ----
    Personnaly, if melodic and harmonic training is the main target, I would direct you to a very affordable method, based on the moveable solfeg (Do Re Mi, etc...) which helped me improve a lot my ear (I confess that I started very very low).

    http://www.harrisonmusic.com/book/earbook.html

    The great advantage of this method IMO is that it gives you a base of thinking, a way to quickly see where you are weak, etc... And gives you the opportunity to create limitless exercises in the area you want to explore/improve.
    It starts very basically, with simplke diatonic structure identification and builds on the concepts towards chromatic music.
    I tried other books which did not help me at all, because it was just a long list of exercices without any logical link. With this one, I at last had a feeling that my ear discovered something.
    Hope it helps.

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