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Topic: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

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  1. #1
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    Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    I recently read on slashdot of companies beginning to discriminate against difficult customers.

    "Best Buy is one of the retailers that has now decided that the customer is not always right. Best Buy consultant Larry Selden has identified "demon customers" like those who file for a rebate then return the item... Other categories like customers who only buy during sales are more interesting... Some stores have actually "fired" customers."

    What ever happened to the customer always being right? Granted there are always some difficult customers but they account for a very small fraction.

    GPO people are excellent. I found them to be reasonable, courteous and understanding even if problems arise.

    Do you think there is such a thing as a "demon" customers?

    Gary Garritan

  2. #2

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    "Demon customers"?

    Yes they exist and I am one that has lost patience with them. They are taking valuable time and resources away from good, paying customers. There is a reason why almost every retail store has a sign that reads something like : "We reserve the right to refuse service to anyone ..."

    YBaCuO

  3. #3

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    There are lots of idiots out there.

    ...These idiots generally do not bother with Garritan Orchestral Libraries.

  4. #4

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    Working in music retail for the last 8 years I have found that the customer is right to a point. It is when they cross the line of reasonable discussion that the customer stops being right.

    In my dealings I always treat people the way I would like to be treated and try to always view problems from their standpoint. When I feel that a customer is trying to pull one over on me is when the flexability stops. In my mind, when a person is trying to "work the system" in their favor they stop being a regular customer, and become a "demon customer".

  5. #5

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    Though the issue itself is very tricky to navigate, from the outside the choices seem clearer.

    If 98%+ of your customers are satisfied-in-the-extreme, or can be made so relatively easily, that's your baseline. That's the norm.

    Yes, there are plenty of cads who thrive on "working the system". There are also more than plenty of persons with serious character flaws that impel them to create an adversive situation, because that is the norm for >them<.

    Gary, you have shown to the members of this forum your gleeful excess of interest and support. It's practically legendary. But that doesn't mean you have to continue to extend your generous courtesies to persons who raise a red flag in the back of your mind.

    Follow your instinct, and know that the 98%+ out here salute you heartily.

  6. #6

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    Quote Originally Posted by David_Maddux

    Gary, you have shown to the members of this forum your gleeful excess of interest and support. It's practically legendary. But that doesn't mean you have to continue to extend your generous courtesies to persons who raise a red flag in the back of your mind.

    Follow your instinct, and know that the 98%+ out here salute you heartily.
    AMEN David!!!! I Couldn't have said it better than that myself!

  7. #7

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    Gary,

    As long as the customer is reasonable, then I think companies should try to help them. If they are unreasonable, then the company has every right to refuse to deal with the customer. You can tell them that you will not discuss this matter, but hope that that you can continue to have a working relationship (or whatever), but if it's bad enough, then you'd be better of severing the relationship. Personally speaking, I don't want the kinds of people described in the article as a part of our GPO community.

    Interesting thought...since we are a GPO community, we might consider developing "community standards". This way we all agree as to what to expect from you and what we in turn can do to continue to support you and the community. Just a thought.

    Wes

  8. #8

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    I agree with everything above, however, some companies deserve every "demon customer" that they've created. Usually, these companies are on their last leg and have lost all clue in the customer service department. Best Buy is not one of them, but one must wonder why they're drawing attention to themselves in this manner. Just by stating this attitude publicly, I'm much less likely to visit Best Buy and move to their competitors, both on and off the internet.

  9. #9

    Smile Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    The best customer understands that it's in his/her best interest to bend over backwards in pursuit of fair trade. The best businesses understand likewise. The result is the creation of true value: each side gets more (if only marginally) then what they started with. (Assuming the participants are rational and are trading in their own best self interest).

    Disruptions (like 'demon' customers) create economic 'friction' and thus a loss of value. Only short sighted individuals can't see that an increase in relative value benefits all of us; only short sighted individuals can't see a good thing when its staring them in the face.

  10. #10

    Re: Customer Disservice-Is the customer is always right?

    I know this isn't about Best Buy but, I feel that my comments pertain to the BIG BOYS when it comes to large retail store chains. I feel like Best Buy thinks that if they have the best return policy then they win. People return items for dishonest reasons, and that product gets sold below cost to an employee or goes back to the manufacturer and gets reboxed and sold as "B" stock. This is a loss for virtually everyone, especially the consumer because ultimately, honest customers are paying higher prices for the dishonest returns. Best Buy is certainly not going to take the loss. I think stores should be more carefull with their return policies and cut down the waste which will reduce the prices of products on the shelf. This all comes back to.. "is the customer always right?" At this point, the store would rather loose this particular sale and realize that they have satisfied the customer with a "no questions asked" return. Customers have taken advantage of this "customer is always right" policy and have abused it to the max. Insurance companies have fallen into the same trap, don't worry about who's at fault in the accident, just pay the stinkin' bill, it's cheaper than paying the lawyers in court. I'm rambling, but I salute Gary and anyone that goes out of their way to satisfy their customers.

    An old saying... A sale is not the end of a transaction, but the beginning of an obligation.
    Peace!

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