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Topic: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

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  1. #1

    2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    1) if i use the \"capture to wave\" command, and record at a low level, and then normalize the .wav in sound forge, am i getting a lower quality recording then if i had boosted the faders in the output page?

    it\'s all digital, never leaving the computer, so i wonder if its losing resolution as if i was recording to a seperate device at too low a digital level.

    2)
    the nfx delay works when an instrument is either panned to the center, or one of the two sides (i can\'t remember which.)

    When panned to the other side, the delay will not sound. i have forgotten if it\'s the left or right that will not work. do BOTH input sides work for anyone else?

  2. #2

    Re: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    I\'m jsut guessnig but I believe turing p the output volume and capturing at a louder level would be the better option. I believe you get general noise dependant on resolution you capture to. This may also be dithered noise. Normalizing would therefore Raise that noise aswell, where as if you\'d turned up the volume the noise floor added by dithering/capturing would,...overall, be lower.

    as for the Delay I haven\'t used it much...er in facrt at all..I think its lying in a zip file somwhere on my computer...lost in oblivian...

    so sorry can\'t help

    ------------------
    Really...I am an Idiot

    [This message has been edited by KingIdiot (edited 02-28-2002).]

  3. #3

    Re: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by quirk:
    It doesn\'t matter what the volume is. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Practically this may be true for you, assuming a \"reasonable\" record level, but technically it\'s not at all true. If level didn\'t matter we wouldn\'t need dithering and such.

  4. #4

    Re: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    It doesn\'t matter what the volume is. I usually record at a lower volume and just normalize that way I\'m sure not to cause any distortion. normalizing has no effect on quality.This of course only applies to the digital domain. If you were recording to an analog medium you definatly want a hot signal.

  5. #5

    Re: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    The key to digital recording is resolution. If you record at the full 16 bits (which almost never happens except at the peaks) your speaker can go to one of 65,536 positions to represent the sound wave at that instant. If you record to a different medium which can handle 24 bits, your speaker can move to one of 16,777,216 positions! This is why bit depth is so important.

    If you record very quietly at 16 bits, you may only have 3 or 4 bits to describe the complex signal you are trying to represent - result being the speaker is trying to go to one of 8 positions. A VERY big difference in accuracy. At 24 bits, the same level would get you 1024 positions.

    If you record 16 bits at that level and then NORMALIZE, you are STILL only going to have one of 8 speaker positions. Only now they are at 65536, 16,384, 4096, 1024, 256, 64, 16 and 0, rather than 8,7,6,5,4,3,2,1,0.

    To record digitally you should always record as hot as possible without ever going over full scale (the distortion is horrific.)

    If you are recording multiple dynamic level samples, there are people on both sides of the fence-record softer, or record as loud as possible and mix quieter.

    I would probably fall in the moderately close-miked, record fff at full scale, then the other dynamis at relative levels. But I\'d feel better about that if we were recording into a 24-bit environment, so I don\'t record to GS. I record to Digital Performer, or a Mackie HDR24/96, both at 24-bit, then dither down only at the last pass.

    There are a number of good books on digital recording techniques, plus a series of forums hosted by musicplayer.com whcih are hosted by luminaries like Roger Nichols and Ed Cherney where you can get REALLY detailed info.

    Hope this helps.

    Dasher

    [This message has been edited by thesoundsmith (edited 03-04-2002).]

  6. #6

    Re: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    soundsmith-

    thanks to you and all the others for your answers.

    i had hoped that resampling back to giga would not be considered the same as recording d/d to a different device (suc has dig performer). in other words, i was hoping that \"capture to wave\" wouldn\'t lose resolution, but apparently it does (at low levels).

    is there really an advantage with 24 bit if the samples are 16? perhaps there is, based on your answer. i guess it\'s those low level areas that lose the resolution.

  7. #7

    Re: 2 questions for techs or anyone who might know

    <BLOCKQUOTE><font size=\"1\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by gaucho:
    is there really an advantage with 24 bit if the samples are 16? perhaps there is, based on your answer. i guess it\'s those low level areas that lose the resolution. <HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

    Yes, there still is an advantage to 24-bit capture of 16-bit samples because you are adding up waveforms when you play and the result can either add up to more than 16 bits (distortion) or, conversely, have the low level signal resolution issues that Soundsmith explained so well. 24 bits gives you more room to work doing your processing, normalizing, etc. with less signal degradation. Then, when everything is optimized, you can reduce the bit depth to 16 if that is the bit depth you need.

    In the final analysis only you can determine whether you need the additional resolution. If you\'re a hobbyist you may have different criteria than the studio pro who is competing in a 24-bit marketplace.

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