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Topic: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

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  1. #1
    andyt
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    GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Having been convinced that GigaPulse makes upgrading to Orchestra a better option than Ensemble, I'm itching to see what impulses will ship with GS3.

    I'm sure I've read somewhere that there will be about 10 included. While hopefully it will include some decent concert hall / theatre impulses I'm sure there will be a demand for many, many more. (as a bench mark, I've read a review of Waves IR1 that says it comes with 120 odd)


    I wonder how Tascam plan to meet this: Will they be marketing impulse libraries themselves, or will they rely on third parties to develop the impulse content, either as adjunct to samples libraries or stand-alone libraries.

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Hi Andy,

    GigaPulse includes some really nice preset material. I think it would be a little rude of me to get very specific about it, but in the VERY early bundled content there were 13 of the 7 channel, 18 position rooms. There are 11 of Larry Seyer's 5 channel, 15-variation pop effects (most of those are reverb-related). There are some rooms from Csaba Huszty (Notre Dame Budapest Cathedral), Ernest Cholakis, etc. There's the GigaPiano II piano resonances, packaged separately so you can experiment with putting them on other things (something you will definitely want to do!!).

    OK, that was more specific than I intended. Needless to say, that is a pretty good hunk of material. Remember that a GigaPulse preset is not like an IR-1 preset. The amount of variation you can get from any of the multiposition rooms is almost limitless.

    In addition there are around 25 really nice mic models, some tube exciters, some Mono-Stereo converters, some pickup converters (i.e. neck to bridge), etc., in the Modeling slots. Remember that there are TWO of these slots for each processing "channel." So, a 7-channel room has four (three pairs plus center) different sets of two Modeler slots, where you can either use a microphone devonvolver/convolver combo, an effect followed by a different mic, etc.

    As far as who will make content, that varies. Some people will produce it themselves with the tools. I suspect that there are people interested in developing this content who have no interest in doing sample libraries. Sample library producers working with intense instrument modeling tools will self-produce impulses of body resonances, alternate pickup points, alternate microphone sets, etc.

    Until some of the third-party content starts to flow, I don't think you will lack for anything. Consider that each of the room simulations has 18 discrete positions times four mic groups. That is 72 variations if you only try the different DISCRETE options. If you do the math on the combination (cascaded) options, you have almost 5,200 variations--in EACH room simulation. And that is before you adjust a single parameter.

    My prediction is that the third-party GigaPulse content producers will learn from the bundled examples, but will come up with completely different directions and signature combinations internally. Because it is much more of a development environment than a simple impulse convolver (but not so complex a non-programmer can't easily build content), I think we can't possibly predict how people will be building GigaPulse content a year from now.

  3. #3
    andyt
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    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Thanks Bruce. Very interesting.

    I'm very inept at using reverb. I've read tonnes of stuff about how to use it to place instruments ... but when it comes to applying it I don't really have a clue. Pre-delays, Damping, Distance, Dry & Wet ... I know what they all mean, but do I really know how to use all these parameters? No. I just experiment until it sounds okay-ish. I use it to give a bit of a tail to dry instruments during live playing, and to add some polish to a final mix.

    So I'm hoping all the multiple mic placements is really gonna cut through the complexity of setting all these parameters individually, and make it easier to to give a semblance of 3 dimensional mix (I don't mean surround ... I mean depth)

  4. #4

    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Thanks for elaborating, Bruce!

    Hopefully Tascam will understand to set up an appropriate forum for users to exchange knowledge and settings of GigaPulse to ensure the "development environment" will indeed be prosperous.

    You mention Mono -> Stereo simulation as one of the options with GP. Couldn't this mean enhanced usage of mono samples in instruments to boost polyphony?

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Well, on one hand, GigaPulse may help you, but be warned that until you learn the actual phenomena involved in your perception of instrument placement, it will ultimately just give you a LOT more options with less of a shortcut than you might imagine.

    I have been in this business since the seventies. One thing remains constant--the shortcut to great mixes has never been invented.

    I'm not going to write a book here, but some very simple guidelines:

    Pre-Delay is how you determine the implied distance an instrument exists from a reflective wall. The longer it takes to "bounce" the farther away the reflection seems to be. NOT the instrument...the reflection.

    The INSTRUMENT's distance from you is somewhat determined by reflective content, but more determined by frequency. Air burns off highs over distance. Imagine a car with huge subwoofer driving down the street. You hear the sub first, and only when the car passes do you really start hearing the upper frequencies (if the windows are down, that is).

    Damping...the amount of soft things (like people or curtains) in a room, soaking up reflections.

    Distance--hard to describe any definition for that, since a different reverb is likely to use it differently. Probably a multi-parameter setting that alters the pre-delay and amount of tail reflections (Waves TrueVerb, et. al.)

    Dry and Wet--in a traditional reverb, the amount of generated reflection (wet) as opposed to the amount of unaffected signal (dry). With convolution you generally do not want to use ANY dry signal. The more advanced convolvers alter the actual shape of the impulse in realtime to change the relative balance of direct to room. This eliminates the harmful effect of phase differences between the two signals. All that said, the rule is that there are no rules. Sometimes, the very best sounding tracks in the world have a mixture of dry and wet signal, and almost all traditional algorithmic reverbs, physical plates and chambers, etc., work on this principle.

    3-D mix...Here's the secret: Complementary relationships. Just like purple never looks more purple than when juxtaposed to yellow (blue/orange, red/green, etc.), a WET signal never sounds wetter than when compared to a dry one. To build a deep, exaggerated soundstage, you must likewise exaggerate the relationships. The key to this is practicing enough to know the limits of creating the illusion.

    The very best thing you can do is observe nature here. Just stand outside, and listen to the wind, traffic, birds, bugs. Don't let your brain dismiss the sound by simply categorizing it as a "thing." Instead, listen to it as if it were an orchestra. You'll hear the difference in the same thing close-up vs. far away. Those differences are the differences you apply using EQ, placement, width, and reverb to simulate distance and size.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Quote Originally Posted by unison
    Thanks for elaborating, Bruce!

    Hopefully Tascam will understand to set up an appropriate forum for users to exchange knowledge and settings of GigaPulse to ensure the "development environment" will indeed be prosperous.

    You mention Mono -> Stereo simulation as one of the options with GP. Couldn't this mean enhanced usage of mono samples in instruments to boost polyphony?
    You could do that with no problem. A mono source is going to be convolved into the stereo space anyway. I was speaking specifically of "effects" type stereoizing. This would probably be inappropriate for anything besides rhythm section instruments, etc. Not a naturalistic thing...

  7. #7

    Lightbulb Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lee Blaske
    Hopefully, Tascam will develop large libraries of impulse content. Otherwise, it might not get done.
    Gary Garritan has taken a large number of impulses. Alexy Vaneev is updating his impulse model development program to include multiple recording sources. Spirit Canyon Audio has an incredible array of non-reverb and reverberant impulses that are out of this world. If they can be talked into developing for GS3, I think that there will be plenty of convolution fodder in a short period of time.
    Houston Haynes - Titan Line Music

  8. #8
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    The amount of material included in GigaPulse is staggering. There is more impulse content in a single room than that which makes up the entire IR-1 collection.

    Just using different source positions, different pickup positions, and different balancing of those elements in stereo alone is thousands of discrete options--for each space. I already wrote about this, so I won't belabor it. In surround, those options multiply accordingly.

    The key to understanding the situation is to stop thinking of GigaPulse as a reverb. It's a development environment on the supply-side level and on the end-user level. You, as the end user, will develop signature reverb sounds based on the 5,000 and change combinations you can achieve with the component impulses of ***each**** room.

    So, in other words, Tascam is way ahead of you on providing ample material to get started. If you spent every day for a year saving "reverbs" that you like to use based on the toolset, you wouldn't get through it.

    I suspect most of the GigaPulse development is not going to be reverbs. It's going to be components of acoustic phenomena that are instrument related.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    I have to laugh a little at this, Lee. It's as if you are just looking for any detail upon which to cast doubt.

    No, it's not hard to use. It's stupidly simple to use. Here's a lesson.

    You have mic positions. You have performer positions. You can either pick a single performer position which will be sent to all mics, or you can choose to attach different positions to different mics (if, say, you're playing an ensemble patch which already has stereo spread inherent, or a library like SISS, etc., which has player position inherent).

    You can choose to use a single set of mics, mix multiple sets of mics to stereo, or send different mic positions to different surround outputs.

    You can choose the "perspective" (basically the implied distance from source) and the delay time for each set of mics in any case.

    Come on, man. You are one of the people here who should be able to recognize a power tool when you see it. There's nothing daunting about it. There are presets to get you started, and to teach you how to use it. There are tutorials to teach you how to use it. And the only time I had to refer to them was to learn how to set up multiples. Which was easy.

    Why don't you reserve negative our doubtful judgement until you have some basis upon which to judge? That will keep the level of misinformation and needless doubts to a minimum. I will be happy to clarify anything anyone cares to know, to the best of my ability and available time.

  10. #10

    Re: GigaPulse Impulse Libraries - who will develop ?

    On the other hand, developing resonance models and integrating them into instruments will likely be more complicated than working with mic placements.

    But that's what's cool. A tool that's easy and intuitive for most tasks, yet powerful and deep for the experts.

    I saw the demo at NAB. The easy stuff looked super easy and intuitive to boot.

    It may not be so easy for my old Athon though. May be time for an upgrade...

    -JF

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