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Topic: Click track bleed?

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  1. #1

    Click track bleed?

    Is it common to hear the click track in film score soundtracks? I was listening to 'Spirited Away' the other day, and I've noticed on several tracks that the click track, as quiet as it is, is audible.

  2. #2

    Re: Click track bleed?

    I had this problem too Aaron with some of the performers I've recorded in the past - until I turned the frequency of the beep lower - now it is not noticable.
    Alan Lastufka | www.BelaDMedia.com
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  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Re: Click track bleed?

    Excellent tip, Alan. It's one of those "Doh, now why didn't I think of that?" solutions.
    -Hudson

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan Lastufka
    I had this problem too Aaron with some of the performers I've recorded in the past - until I turned the frequency of the beep lower - now it is not noticable.

  4. #4

    Re: Click track bleed?

    Danny Elfman's Nightmare Before Christmas also has some "nice" click track bleeds

  5. #5

    Re: Click track bleed?

    Quote Originally Posted by A_Sapp
    [...] I was listening to 'Spirited Away' the other day [...]
    .... a _marvellous_ film, BTW.

  6. #6

    Re: Click track bleed?

    Of course! One of my top 5 favorite films (animated or not ).

  7. #7
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Click track bleed?

    It's one of those really hard problems when you're seating a huge ensemble, compounded by the fact that you've got to use high mic gains compared to rhythm-section type productions.

    If you only feed click to the conductor, the problem is reduced. The problem is that it's very easy for the tail to "wag the dog" when you have an entire ensemble vs. one conductor (especially when composers, who are generally not very seasoned conductors, are at the baton).

    I played the most grueling tour of my life in a situation where the drummer was playing to a click--because we were recording a double-length live album, and the producer wanted tracks from any night to be interchangable on both the album and the video.

    That was THE worst playing experience of my life. When only the drummer has the click, he's necessarily going to pull off at times, and therefore will have to fudge the time to get back on. BUT, when no one else can hear the click, it's as if the time of the entire ensemble is on some sort of see-saw, and you never know when the drummer is going to basically stick his leg out and trip the rest of the ensemble (this particular drummer was a bit less seasoned than the rest of us, compounding the problem even more).

    I have a feeling that a tightly-sync'ed cue in an orchestral session would be a similar situation, and I'm sure that people have tried it both ways and found that giving everyone the click is the better tradeoff.

  8. #8

    Re: Click track bleed?

    Great topic Aaron. I know that a click track can be heard on softer passages on the score Gettysburg.

    What we have done to over come this issue when recording a large group was to create a full screen flash movie of a metronome blinking various tempos. The flash movie is sent out to a lagre monitor via S Video.

    Sonically, it cant be beat... but your performers will need therapy to get that flashing image out of their heads
    Bela D Media | www.BelaDMedia.com

  9. #9

    Re: Click track bleed?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce A. Richardson
    I have a feeling that a tightly-sync'ed cue in an orchestral session would be a similar situation, and I'm sure that people have tried it both ways and found that giving everyone the click is the better tradeoff.
    Yes, I have tried both ways (that sounds rather perverted, but I'm sure that you know what I mean), and I agree that the only solution when using an audio click is for everyone to have it. If only the conductor has it, then there is no musical interaction with the players, as they are never sure how much to indulge in their own musicality. However, when they hear the click as well they are fully aware of how much "give" there is in the tempo. However, there are many times when the click is dropped out to give a little more freedom and then introduced again later in the cue, and as long as the conductor is on the ball then this doesn't cause any problems.

    DG

  10. #10
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    Re: Click track bleed?

    Another option is to give everybody sealed phones like Sennheiser HD280's---nothing gets out of those babies! But it can still be a problem since many musicians prefer to record with one ear uncovered, and others hate using sealed phones for sonic and comfort reasons. I would think that an experienced film conductor would be able to function well as the only person hearing the click. But I've heard more than once that in the studio, even orchestral players usually prefer to hear the click.

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