• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 7 of 7

Topic: Pedals on the Piano

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Pedals on the Piano

    I have a Yamaha P90 digital piano, which I am running through Gigastudio 2.5. I'm curious as to whether or not I can translate my keyboard's sustain signal to a damper or sostenuto signal. You see, my keyboard comes with only a full sustain pedal jack, but I would find it much more useful as a damper or sostenuto pedal. So I'm wondering whether or not one can tell Gigastudio, or other midi intake devices, to hear the "sustain" signal as one of these other signals. In addition, does anyone know of a midi controller that comes as a 3 piano-pedal set, so I could play my P90 as a real piano?

  2. #2

    Re: Pedals on the Piano

    Ooh. Good question. Sostenuto was one of the big requests from way back. I haven't read anything about ti being there - or not being there - in GS3.

    Anybody?

    -JF

  3. #3

    Re: Pedals on the Piano

    Bump?

  4. #4

    Re: Pedals on the Piano

    That would be VERY nice !!!

    Although, not all sostenuto pedals function the same -

    Sample developer comments ?? Mr. Post ??

  5. #5

    Re: Pedals on the Piano

    My greatest request to developers is the very important soft pedal (and perhaps sustenuto)

    Here something about this:

    " I. The Soft Pedal
    Throughout the major upper section of the keyboard range, each note has three strings; in the lower range each has two, while the lowest notes have only one. On a grand piano, the soft pedal shifts the entire action slightly to one side so that the hammers strike one less string per note (or, in the lower bass range, the hammers strike off-center). This creates a sound which is more muted and less vibrant than without the soft pedal. Therefore, the primary use of the soft pedal is to manipulate sound quality. It is employed to create an atmosphere of mystery, other-worldliness, distance, inwardness, fantasy, et cetera.
    Unusual effects can be achieved by depressing the soft pedal to various intermediate degrees instead of all the way down. However, these are very subtle, specialized, and rare.
    There is another use of the soft pedal which is desirable only as a last resort. Since the soft pedal produces a slight reduction in volume, many students make this the main function of the soft pedal and never develop the ability to play softly without it. A pianist can play perfectly loudly with the soft pedal down. Please remember that the primary use of the soft pedal is to manipulate sound quality. Dynamics are controlled with your arms, hands, and fingers, not your feet.
    II. The Sostenuto Pedal
    The sostenuto pedal acts as a selective damper pedal by sustaining specifically chosen notes. To use it, play and hold down a note or chord. Then depress the sostenuto pedal. After releasing the keys, those notes will continue to sound until the sostenuto pedal is released. The damper pedal can be changed while the sostenuto pedal is down without affecting the notes held by the sostenuto pedal. This pedal is ordinarily used in organ-like textures to sustain long bass notes below changing harmonies ("pedal point")."

    From
    http://www.jeffreychappell.com/pedaling.htm

    Perhaps you could create an additional CD/DVD with "pppp-f soft pedal sound" to complete your wonderfull available piano libraries? (I will buy it!)

  6. #6

    Thumbs up Re: Pedals on the Piano

    "This creates a sound which is more muted and less vibrant than without the soft pedal. Therefore, the primary use of the soft pedal is to manipulate sound quality. It is employed to create an atmosphere of mystery, other-worldliness, distance, inwardness, fantasy, et cetera."

    Yes, I agree!

    Please look for a solution to add the soft pedal feature to the piano libraries!

  7. #7

    Re: Pedals on the Piano

    Perhaps a simple hardware solution:

    I could use a switch pedal to go from one channel to an other.. and back.
    (Normal piano channel 1- soft pedal channel 2)

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •