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Topic: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

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  1. #1
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    As a percussionist I must point out for the benefit of those who do not or have limited knowledge of melodic percussion instruments. This is a small typo I found on pages 46 & 47 with the labeling of Marimba and Xylophone. On page 46, is a picture of a Marimba that looks to be at least 4 octave, not a xylophone as labeled. On page 47, that is a picture of a wood (usually rosewood) xylophone usually no more than an octave or two, not a Marimba.
    This is just a small mislabeling of these instruments however I feel strongly one should take note of the differences. Glockenspiel and Vibraphone are fine.
    By the way, the Marimba is capable of longer sustaining notes due to the longer resonators and lower register of the instrument.
    I used to own a Musser Concert Grand Marimba and it always twisted my nerves when someone would come up to me and ask, where did you get that Xylophone?
    Styxx

  2. #2

    Wink Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    Thanks for the info, Styxx. I can relate to where you are coming from. I played primarily low brass instruments (now just piano ) and my favorite was euphonium (tuba was a close second). As we all know, the euphonium (baritone, whatever) is not the most popular of instruments. People would always ask `Is that a mini tuba?' or `What is that?! (include inflections of disbelief/disgust). We euphonium players were abused (yes, everyone can start weeping and wailing now ) and underappreciated.

    I have to go now and look up the name of my therepist...

    -Kevin
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  3. #3

    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    I feel your pain. I'm an oboist and people still say 'I didn't know you played the clarinet.' I don't. 'Oh that's right! You play the bassoon!' It's amazing to me that people don't know the difference.

    I have odd disbeliefs about people that can't recognize instruments by the sound (let alone sight). How can you not know it's a viola? How can you not hear that it's obviously a bass clarinet? It's like knowing for so long, it is so second nature to know, it's a completely foreign idea to not know...as foreign to me as the concept of knowing and understanding is to the other person.

  4. #4

    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    I'm a violist and every now and then I have to explain what a viola is.

    Elsewhere in TGTMO, a pair of congas are displayed labeled as bongos. The book is very useful overall but is full of little proofreading errors like this.

    Am I the first to call it TGTMO?
    Dan Powers
    www.danielpowers.info

    "It's easier to be a composer than it is to compose."
    --Ray Luke (1928-2010)

  5. #5

    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    The typography leads a lot to be desired. While the content is good, I suspect nobody with a publishing background went anywhere near it before it went to press.

  6. #6
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    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    Thanks for pointing this out. The book is on my wish list, and it's the kind of thing I wouldn't have noticed in a million light years.

    Since my music background (such as it is) is piano/keyboard based, I feel reasonably confident when it comes to hand playing most orchestral instrument samples, but I am clueless about percussion.

    To Styxx and other percussionists out there: Do you believe this book would be helpful in terms of learning which midi notes play what, and how to learn to "play" percussion ensembles?

  7. #7
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    Talking Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    Quote Originally Posted by danpowers
    I'm a violist and every now and then I have to explain what a viola is.
    I'm a guitarist and every now and then, ... Oh, nevermind.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    Quote Originally Posted by danpowers
    I'm a violist and every now and then I have to explain what a viola is.

    Elsewhere in TGTMO, a pair of congas are displayed labeled as bongos. The book is very useful overall but is full of little proofreading errors like this.

    Am I the first to call it TGTMO?
    Yes, upon reading your reply I also see on the same page an African Talking Drum labeled as a Conga. This may not seem like a big deal but for those who first come upon these instrument will always have it carved into their brains the way they've seen it here.
    Backing up to page 48, the Tubular bells are labeled as Chimes. The descriptions seem fine and actually contradict the picture. Mostlikely adding to the confusion.
    Styxx

  9. #9

    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    There are certainly a lot of errors in this book, especially with the pictures, but the meat and potatoes (if you wish) are still fundamentally accurate and would be helpful to many. I hope these editing problems do not distract from the very useful information contained in the book as I feel this would be doing the work an injustice.

    Too bad Paul couldn't have hired a decent editor, it really would have saved him a lot of face.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: The Guide TO Midi Orchestration.

    JB - By no means am I trying to put this book down. The content is fantastic and quite informative. It is that sometimes pictures tend to solidify more than words.
    Styxx

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