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Topic: Snare: Difference between left & right

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  1. #1

    Snare: Difference between left & right

    Are the left and right snares ment to be different?

    My ears tell me that they are pitched very, very slightly appart. I haven't listened since the update, so I'm not sure if it is different now.

    If you're tone deaf don't bother trying to listen - I've already asked a person afflicted with this condition and they couldn't hear anything beyond it being a snare drum.

  2. #2

    Re: Snare: Difference between left & right

    yes, the left and right hand snare samples are different, this eliminates the horrid machine gun effect if only one was used repeatedly.
    They should be played alternating (left, right) just the same as a drummer would play the snare.
    DPDan

  3. #3

    Re: Snare: Difference between left & right

    Matt,

    The left and right hands are very definitely meant to be slightly different from one another in both intonation and panning position. They must be or the dreaded "machine gun effect" tends to emerge. Left and right hand hits sound slightly different from one another in real life in many ways, including intonation, level, timbre, and attack strength. We try to use programming tools to subtly differentiate between hands. The presence of VAR1 and (especially) VAR2 can also help with this issue.

    Snare isn't the only instrument that differentiates between left and right hands in GPO. Other instruments like timpani and bass drum also differentiate.

    Tom

    P.S. By the way, the slight detuning of samples between hands is a trick that has been used for many years with drum modules. I can remember using this trick (along with small level differences between hands) in the mid ‘80s with my Alesis HR16 to minimize problems with rolls.

  4. #4

    Re: Snare: Difference between left & right

    DPDan beat me to it! And said it in fewer words too!

    Tom

  5. #5
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Talking Re: Snare: Difference between left & right

    I knew I was playing something wrong all these years!
    Styxx

  6. #6

    Re: Snare: Difference between left & right


  7. #7

    Re: Snare: Difference between left & right

    Cheers guys. Makes sense. At least I know I'm not going nuts

  8. #8
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    Re: Snare: Difference between left & right

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    Matt,

    The left and right hands are very definitely meant to be slightly different from one another in both intonation and panning position. They must be or the dreaded "machine gun effect" tends to emerge. Left and right hand hits sound slightly different from one another in real life in many ways, including intonation, level, timbre, and attack strength. We try to use programming tools to subtly differentiate between hands. The presence of VAR1 and (especially) VAR2 can also help with this issue.

    Snare isn't the only instrument that differentiates between left and right hands in GPO. Other instruments like timpani and bass drum also differentiate.

    Tom

    P.S. By the way, the slight detuning of samples between hands is a trick that has been used for many years with drum modules. I can remember using this trick (along with small level differences between hands) in the mid ‘80s with my Alesis HR16 to minimize problems with rolls.
    Hi Tom,

    I got interested in orchestral emulation and synths etc during the home organ fad! The drum rolls these had were absolutely awful and I couldn't understand why this was the best they could do.... even in those days. When I got going into sequencing I very quickly discovered that the machine gun effect was almost totally due to the complete quantisation, dead on beat, triggering they used. The variations you mention are just the icing on the cake.!

    I found that tweaking ('kicking' in Cubase) the 'note' positions slightly on and off the beats produced a completely acceptable roll......and even this could be enhanced by varying hit velocities and by varying the volume too (as you suggest). I know, from this experience, that it is the timing, much more than the timbre variations which is responsible for the machine gun effect.....and I think this conclusion is quite obvious when you think how accurately a drummer can drum. It's worth an experiment if anyone needs to convince themselves! After all, the timbre of a machine gun probably varies more than the frequency of triggering!

    This all fits in with orchestration in general as I, and others, have mentioned numerous times on the forums. If you don't want stuff to sound unnatural just think about the natural human world with their vagaries. Start and stop the instumentalists at different times, and speeds and velocities....that's how it is...we're not computers or machine guns.

    One of the great eye openers for me during my sequencing years was just how sensitive the ears are to rythym timing. I could hear just around 3 'ticks'. This really surprised me at the time but this also fitted in with my drum roll experience.

    Respect

    Frank

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