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Topic: GPO Piano

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  1. #1

    Question GPO Piano

    Hello,

    I am new here, as you can see. I have not yet purchased GPO, but I have a feeling it won't be long from now. What an outstanding product!

    However, I have a question:

    It appears to me that many people don't care for the GPO Steinway. They don't say it right out, but considering that hardly anyone appears to be using it, and most people get other piano samples from other companies, it would seem that most of you don't care for it.

    Am I wrong? Could somebody please help me out? I compose mostly for the piano, and would like a nice piano sound. All of the individual piano samples from other companies are so expensive, and wouldn't want to pay $500+ when I only have to pay $270.

    Another thing, if anybody could put of some demos of the GPO piano that you have made, I would be really appreciative.

    Thank you.

  2. #2

    Re: GPO Piano

    I Think that the piano sounds great, but the main reason that I don't use it much is because of the way GPO uses the sustain pedal for legato passages in most of the orchestral instruments. When you set the sustain pedal to work like a sustain pedal for the piano it messes up the legato passages in the orchestra. If you could run two instances of Kontakt, one set for sustain, and one set for piano that would be great, but the player doesn't like to do that. So I use the pianos that I have in my Gigastudio setup. I've heard that there are ways to trick the Kontakt player to work the way I described but I haven't figured that out yet.

    If you're mainly using the piano I think that you'd find it very usable.

  3. #3

    Re: GPO Piano

    I Think that the piano sounds great, but the main reason that I don't use it much is because of the way GPO uses the sustain pedal for legato passages in most of the orchestral instruments. When you set the sustain pedal to work like a sustain pedal for the piano it messes up the legato passages in the orchestra. If you could run two instances of Kontakt, one set for sustain, and one set for legato that would be great, but the player doesn't like to do that. So I use the pianos that I have in my Gigastudio setup. I've heard that there are ways to trick the Kontakt player to work the way I described but I haven't figured that out yet.

    If you're mainly using the piano I think that you'd find it very usable.

  4. #4

    Re: GPO Piano

    Quote Originally Posted by Cody
    I Think that the piano sounds great, but the main reason that I don't use it much is because of the way GPO uses the sustain pedal for legato passages in most of the orchestral instruments. When you set the sustain pedal to work like a sustain pedal for the piano it messes up the legato passages in the orchestra. If you could run two instances of Kontakt, one set for sustain, and one set for legato that would be great, but the player doesn't like to do that. So I use the pianos that I have in my Gigastudio setup. I've heard that there are ways to trick the Kontakt player to work the way I described but I haven't figured that out yet.

    If you're mainly using the piano I think that you'd find it very usable.
    Thanks Cody.

    Any other opinions?

  5. #5

    Re: GPO Piano

    I've been using the GPO piano in situations where the piano is a member of the orchestra or chamber group. It blends very well and is not too CPU intensive. But when I'm working on something in which the piano is used as a soloist (as in one of my current projects, a piano concerto), I use the PMI Grandioso Bosendorfer 290.
    Dan Powers
    www.danielpowers.info

    "It's easier to be a composer than it is to compose."
    --Ray Luke (1928-2010)

  6. #6

    Re: GPO Piano

    JCarey,

    I believe the GPO Steinway sounds pretty darn good and have no qualms about using it for any and everything. As one might expect, the more time spent on dynamic and rhythmic expression, the better.

    If you're interested, I posted this a while back. Feel free to have a listen:

    Fats Waller - Smashing Thirds

  7. #7

    Re: GPO Piano

    Quote Originally Posted by DarwinKopp
    JCarey,

    I believe the GPO Steinway sounds pretty darn good and have no qualms about using it for any and everything. As one might expect, the more time spent on dynamic and rhythmic expression, the better.

    If you're interested, I posted this a while back. Feel free to have a listen:

    Fats Waller - Smashing Thirds
    Thanks DarwinKopp! I have a question:

    There is a demo on the site called "Come Back to Me", and I, for one, think that the piano is absolutely beautiful. How can one achieve such a wonderful sound? In the Info, it mentioned another program called "Cubase SX". In order to get a sound like this, do I have to buy something else? Is there a way to get it like this with GPO by itself?

    Thank you.

  8. #8

    Re: GPO Piano

    JCarey,

    Cubase SX is a midi studio/sequencer in the vein of Sonar, Logic, DP, etc. GPO comes bundled with the lite version of Cubase.

    That's a nice, dreamy, new-age thing. Very pretty. A lot of (most of?) the "sound" you hear is the added reverbation. There are long debates here off and on about various reverbs, which are the best, and what platforms you need to use them. GPO comes bundled with the "Ambience" reverb, which is fine for most mockup and demo work, but is probably insufficient for commercial production. I can't tell what reverb was used on that demo, it might be Ambience, but it might not.

    So to answer your question, to get "that sound" with GPO, you'd use the GPO Steinway, the bundled sequencer or notation program, and the Ambience reverb (or any other reverb that can plug into Cubase).

  9. #9

    Re: GPO Piano

    Back to the original post...

    There are a lot of songs that use the GPO Steinway on the demo page at garritan.com but here are a few highlights:

    http://www.garritan.com/mp3/ChopinMix.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/mp3/ComeBackToMe.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/mp3/nd-Rondo.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/mp3/eternal.mp3
    http://www.garritan.com/mp3/Piano-meniscus.mp3

    Personally, I love the sound of the piano. I've used it in 3 compositions so far and it has the right sound for me.

    Just FYI, here's a quote from Danny Lux (Danny is an Emmy Nominated TV/Film Composer whose music can be heard on many prime time television shows and in the movies. He has composed for the hit series 'Ally McBeal' as well as 'John Doe', 'Boston Public'. 'Hack', and 'Party of Five'. Danny also scored for the film "Halloween Resurrection". Other credits include: 'Profiler', 'Sabrina the Teenage Witch', and 'Dawson's Creek'.)

    "I want to thank you for Garritan Personal Orchestra....It is now a staple in my pallet...The Steinway alone is almost worth the price of admission."

  10. #10

    Re: GPO Piano

    I love the GPO Steinway for classical type work where it needs to blend with the other instruments in the orchestra. On the other hand, if you know for a fact that the particular song or album you are producing needs a certain acoustic piano sound, and the GPO Steinway either sounds good to you, OR, you can play it in a style that "works" with its strengths and weaknesses, then you should be completely happy with it.

    I produced a solo Christmas album with an EMU Proformance Plus (see: http://www.kevinselby.com/images/ProformanceAlls.jpg) because at the time, it had a very dreamy mellow piano sample that the EMU folks just nailed perfectly. I later found a similar piano (the GP-1, which, by the way, goes for about $40 US - see: http://studioax.com) that I used to remaster that particular Christmas album, HOWEVER, the original version is still, in my mind, a perfect representation of what I was trying to capture (and the GP-1 didn't really change the overall sound ALL that much). I then used the GP-1 either solo or with other instruments to produce 4 more albums. My fans could care less HOW I did it, they just like the way it sounds. The GP-1 was the right tool at the right time. I have since determined that I am possibly going to go up to the next level of quality and find a sample grand with "release samples" where they sample how the keys, strings, pads, etc., sound when you let up on the keys. This adds that final touch to the sound of a grand piano. I'm still looking, but I'm not going to let it get in the way of any projects that come along (meaning I'll use what I have so far if I have to).

    There's another grand piano out there called "TruePianos" (see: http://truepianos.com) where I'm a beta tester. It is quite stunning, but still appears to have a few minor glitches. I can put you in touch with the author of that sound if you are interested. Check out: http://www.kevinselby.com/musicfilespublic/TruePiano/ for some .mp3's that I put together using TruePianos (it's a LOT more "live" and bright sounding than, say, GP-1 or GPO Steinway, but it also has a really cool resonance that I just LOVE).

    I also agree that the "room" you put the "piano" in, as well as exactly HOW you play the "piano" will make a huge difference. In fact, one of these days I was going to post an .mp3 file of me walking the GPO Steinway through all KINDS of different styles of piano playing, from classical, to rock, to jazz, to pop, to gospel, just so folks would have a feel for how it sounds in those different situations.

    For now, I'll simply direct you to http://kevinselby.com/gpo and you can download and listen to three different songs that use the GPO, one uses it solo, the other two use it with instruments.

    All three of the above examples show, to some degree, how the GPO Steinway "fits" with other GPO instruments, as well as how GPO performs for long drawn out sustains, and especially for what I would call "cluster" chords where there are some minor seconds or at least seconds thrown together. And the answer is that the GPO Steinway works as well or better than anything I've used before. In other words I'm willing to produce and release albums with this thing.

    On the OTHER hand, for a smooth jazz album that I have in the works (see the aforementioned .mp3's at: http://www.kevinselby.com/musicfilespublic/TruePiano/), it will be difficult to justify using the GPO Steinway for the acoustic piano parts unless I get it to sound a bit less classical and a lot more contemporary and "live". I MAY be able to do that, but then again, I have several other pianos to choose from that may fit the bill better.

    And there are definitely ways around the legato setting limitation.

    Enjoy your search...that's half the fun!!

    -edit-
    woops...forgot to mention that you can hear the GP-1 on ALL the albums at: http://kevinselby.com/gpo that are listed BENEATH the "Pre-GPO Albums" heading.

    sorry...one last edit...

    and all those albums mentioned in the last paragraph without exception were produced using a Roland A-30 keyboard controller (see: http://fr.audiofanzine.com/produits/...oduit,190.html) - 76 semi-weighted keys (can you say "plastic" with a teensy bit of weight so that they can get away with saying "weighted") ......woohoo!!

    I have since moved up to a Roland RD 300S and a Korg N1 both of which provide VASTLY improved realistic action for playing grand piano samples, HOWEVER, nothing beats the A-30 for things like timpani, drums, and blazing fast Dyno-My-Rhodes electric piano riffs.
    Kevin B. Selby
    http://kevinselby.com <-- Public site
    http://kevinselby.com/gpo <--My music catalog FREE to GPO users: username: gpo - pword: garritan

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