• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 48

Topic: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Red face A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Happy new year everybody. I thought all you fellow sampleheads would get a kick out of this- I've been writing the score for a new NBC series, "Medium" - (stars Patricia Arquette- premieres this Mon. Jan 3rd)

    I've been using a small string section on the underscore for most of our episodes (between 8-12 players)- When I was recording the show's main title theme, the producer actually chose to use my original 'sample' demo as opposed the one sweetened by the section(!).

    I had been using a new prerelease copy of the Kirk Hunter Symphonic Strings - mostly the short bows which had a great scary vibe to them and some of the non vibrato patches, plus a bit of sonic implants trem/ponticello.

    He mentioned the main title sequence, (which is kind of an homage to Hitchcock/B. Herman - think main titles to "Vertigo") should sound like "death" - i.e. cold, scary,etc. -

    With the real players it sounded to "old" and "less scary" to him. Pretty funny stuff, and an indication of just how useful these great tools these wonderful developers are putting out there are!
    A big thanks to ALL of them - Gary G, Sonic Implants, Nick, Eric P., Kirk et. all! I wish them all many years of creativity and success helping us all make our music.
    jeff

  2. #2

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Hi Jeff,

    Great story. Wonder if this is a first where samples won over real?

  3. #3

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Maybe it's time to stop calling 'virtual' orchestrations 'mock-ups'. Real, virtual, or using both together are all valid approaches now. I always think 'mock-ups' suggests something along the lines of 'demo'... Just finish it!

    Happy New Year

  4. #4
    Senior Member Robert Kooijman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2000
    Location
    Karlskrona, Sweden
    Posts
    233

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Jeff,

    great story indeed, nice of you to share it with us. It says a thing or two about current & forthcoming libs, but even more of your tremendous skills!

    Cheers, Robert

  5. #5

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    hehe funny story indeed

    ... we all know that real players have magic, feeling, soul etc and whatever, BUT if there is a porducer who likes a certain flow of a certain piece of music, nobody really doesn't care if it's played by real people, samples or even c64 peeptones.

    ... if the flow is there, it flows ... it's that simple

    i know another story of a producer who did a recording with a band and the singer recorded this song with a 4track tape at night within a few minutes.

    after the producer heard the "demotape" they went to the studio to record the song and after hours and days of recording they decided to keep the 4track tape recording because they were not able to catch this magic again

    of course this little story is in no relation with samples, but generally, if the groove and flow is there it is good ....

    and i bet with you ... the music of lord of the rings could have been samples all the way through ... i guess a lot of the non-musicians wouldnt even recognized that ... of ourse the musicians, but the graphic guys also recognize when a scene is made with gfx

  6. #6

    Post Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Great story, Jeff. I am a big fan of "Monk" and I have always loved your music in that show. As a matter of fact, I really liked your Monk into theme music, and I think it was much better than that Randy N. song. Anyway...

    Like Waywyn kinda said, if the music has got the groove on, then music is music. As discussed with others, there are things virtual can and cannot do, there are things real can and cannot do. It has become a mixed media world out there, and "pure" anything is sometimes hard to find. Things are not so simple any more...
    Doyle W. Donehoo, Composer
    Radar Music
    www.doylewdonehoo.com

  7. #7

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Yeah, I agree there is can often be a surge of creativity in the "first demo" version of something that "sticks" for everybody- One of the great things about the whole digital world and the quality of these sounds, is that these "demos" can become "finals" if they go over well, etc. and work.

    I think one really interesting aspect of the "real" vs. "sampled" debate is that the so called "mock ups" can be executed with so much accuracy and precision that it also raises the performance bar for the players too--

    PS - glad you liked my "Monk" main title(!). You're not alone..

    http://www.petitiononline.com/monk123/petition.html

    jeff


    www.jeffbeal.com

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Budleigh Salterton
    Posts
    1,477

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Beal
    Happy new year everybody. I thought all you fellow sampleheads would get a kick out of this- I've been writing the score for a new NBC series, "Medium" - (stars Patricia Arquette- premieres this Mon. Jan 3rd)

    I had been using a new prerelease copy of the Kirk Hunter Symphonic Strings - mostly the short bows which had a great scary vibe to them and some of the non vibrato patches, plus a bit of sonic implants trem/ponticello.

    He mentioned the main title sequence, (which is kind of an homage to Hitchcock/B. Herman - think main titles to "Vertigo") should sound like "death" - i.e. cold, scary,etc. -

    jeff
    Happy New Year to you.

    One of the best opening title music ever written for film - Vertigo, by B. Herrmann. Especially with the brilliance of Saul Bass. Did you achieve that effect? Muted Strings? Does the Kirk Hunter library you mention have muted strings? TIA.

    PR

  9. #9

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    This definitely shows the value of a great composer with a great set of tools. The days of sweating in an expensive studio trying to "get that take" are close to over. I used to spend $1000's in an 8 track studio putting together pop songs. I can't imagine what it used to cost to do an entire orchestra.

    To the avearge individual it may not matter if it's sampled ot real. The differnce is getting so very close. (I'm speaking of recordings, not live) As with so many other areas of life it may boil down to economics and speed.

    Well done!

    Darren

  10. #10

    Re: A funny story about "samples" vs. "real"

    Sometimes I notice this, but I have to wonder if its jsut that someone has heard it "one way" enough times that when its changed (adding real players) sometimes it ruins the familiarity that the listener has.

    I often like some of my early mixes of rock stuff over final mixes because I slam them so hard and they're jsut "louder", ultimately I know that its not the best choice of mix tho. Same goes for orchestral stuff, for before I put everything "in its place" in a room. sometimes the rough mix jsut allows for some instruments to breath more/sound better for the song, but not sound "real" in terms of a real orchestra...

    anyway, I wonder if that was part of it in this case.

    I'll keep an ear out for the track Jeff.
    Operation Mindcrime 2, in stores now.
    or go here...
    The Digital Bitphonic Orchestra
    -Ashif "Ash" Hakik

Go Back to forum
Page 1 of 5 1234 ... LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •