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Topic: String Re-attack on (Not So) Long Note

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  1. #1

    String Re-attack on (Not So) Long Note

    I just noticed that *all* of the new Strad and Guarn solo strings have an extremely noticeable re-attack on a not-so-long sustained note. Not hard to replicate. Just start up GPO player, load one of the any of the Strad or Guarn solo strings, pull up the mod wheel, and play any note.

    Is anyone else having this problem? Is there a solution?

    Thnx!
    DrH

  2. #2

    Re: String Re-attack on (Not So) Long Note

    Quote Originally Posted by DrH
    I just noticed that *all* of the new Strad and Guarn solo strings have an extremely noticeable re-attack on a not-so-long sustained note. Not hard to replicate. Just start up GPO player, load one of the any of the Strad or Guarn solo strings, pull up the mod wheel, and play any note.

    Is anyone else having this problem? Is there a solution?

    Thnx!
    DrH
    Dr,
    I've noticed on the strad solo. You have to hold the note a second or two, right? Definitely there. Haven't noticed on the guarn but will check. Did you get the same on the regular voices and the X-custom? I use pretty much X-custom and haven't checked the regular...recently, but will now.
    Bill

  3. #3

    Re: String Re-attack on (Not So) Long Note

    DrH,

    This is not new to the updates and the subject comes up every few months. I'll go over it one more time. The Gagliano is looped in the standard manner to allow indefinite sustains. The Strad and Guarnarius are looped at the 2nd or 3rd bow direction change. These are the actual bow strokes as used by the player at the recording session. Our original intention was to loop these two in a similar fashion to the Gagliano but we found that the waveform of these samples had to be so drastically altered to allow a successful indefinite loop that the natural character of these two violins was severely damaged. We chose looping at the bow strokes as an alternative that allowed the character of the instruments to remain intact. If you require indefinite sustains the Gagliano is the instrument to use.

    Tom

  4. #4

    Re: String Re-attack on (Not So) Long Note

    Thanks for a newbie to the probelm up-to-date. I did look through the four pages in this section before posting but didn't find such previous advice.

    Of course, I'm aware that a string player playing a long note will (indeed, must) change bow direction. However, a *good* player, which I assume is what these sounds are attempting to emulate, will change direction in such a way that the sound will appear to be continuous. My problem with the GPO Strad and Guarn is that the silence between the bow changes is so prominent that it literally sounds as if the note has been re-attacked, thus creating an unwanted rhythmic addition within a composition.

    While I appreciate that you found yourself having to come up with a workaround solution to a technical problem, I would respectfully suggest that the solution takes away the users choice of two instruments that are far more vibrant than the Gagli, and that it would great if the next library update could give us that choice.

    Thnx again,
    DrH

  5. #5

    Re: String Re-attack on (Not So) Long Note

    It's a nice myth that good players will change bow imperceptibly. Many CAN, at certain speeds and dynamics, but almost everyone never ever does - in orchestra, you will often be told to 'stagger' the bow changes, to hide that 'bump' that conductors, and audiences if they know good from bad, try to avoid at all costs. That's on long arching melodic lines.

    It is possible to hold a long, and quite loud, bow stroke for many many seconds, even while playing different notes, and even crossing strings, but it's not much fun. We will usually 'break up' the bowing to suit position changes, or string changes, and this happens every few notes. Actually I haven't tried suppressing the attack of these solo violins with the pedal to get legato, with new 'strokes every so often', but I did hear the lump on audition, presuming it was a loop. Pretty much the same thing as the 'heel to tip' loop we create on ever stroke.

    Try adding those despicable bulges and swells to your violin lines, and by all means listen to a concert violinist (recordings are easier to inspect) - they thump away like nobody's business - part of the act, and very hard to suppress. Hope this helps.

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