• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Topic: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    Doing a search, I ran across the following post from many moons ago:


    "I do have a Baldwin SD10 Concert Grand Piano in the works, which I will be releasing sometime in the future. It will be several months before the release... very possibly this fall. This particular Baldwin SD10 is in excellent condition and has a Renner action that is extremely quiet, which makes it a perfect candidate for sample recording. It has not been moved around like many pianos, and has not been played hard."

    Any plans for a release?

  2. #2

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    Hi Jake,

    At the moment I am in the process of releasing a sampled acoustic upright bass, which should be available in a few days. This new sampled acoustic bass stands apart from other sampled acoustic basses because it is setup with "gut" strings, rather than the usual steel strings.

    Even though there are some quality sampled acoustic basses available with steel strings, I have never found one that suits my personal taste. Personally I have never liked steel strings on an upright acoustic bass because they have way too much sustain, whereas gut strings decay in volume very rapidly, and thus sound considerably more percussive than steel strings. Steel strings with their long sustaining character will muddy up a mix with other rhythm instruments and they lack that tight percussive character which I like to hear on an acoustic upright bass. As in illustration, steel strings played on an acoustic bass sound like BWAAAAAAAAAA BWAAAAAAAAA BWAAAAAAAAAA BWAAAAAAAAA, whereas gut strings sound more like Bmm Bmm Bmm Bmm Bmm. Gut strings also have a warmer sounding character than steel strings.

    Traditionally, acoustic upright bass players from the 1930s, 40s, 50s, and 60s, always used gut strings on their basses. It wasn't until the 1970's that acoustic bass musicians started using steel strings. The reasons the vast majority of acoustic bass musicians switched to steel strings from gut strings is because steel strings stay in tune much better than gut strings. Typically bass players were always having to retune their basses in between songs on a gig, and also gut strings are especially sensitive to temperature and humidity changes.

    In addition to this tuning problem with gut strings, the main reason the vast majority of acoustic bass musicians switched to steel strings from gut strings is because gut strings have to be set very high on the bridge which makes for a very high action on the finger board in order to get a great sound without excessive buzzing, whereas steel strings can be set much lower on the bridge and are thus much more easier to play than gut strings. Also, gut strings are thicker than steel strings, which also makes for even more difficulty in playing.

    In order to get a quality gut string acoustic bass to sample record, I had to actually purchase an acoustic bass and set it up with gut strings. It is not a simple matter of just changing strings on an acoustic bass in order to have gut strings. Considering the extra thickness of gut strings, as opposed to steel strings, you have to have a luthier carve out bigger notches on the nut and bridge in order to accommodate the thicker gut strings, so once an acoustic bass has been setup with gut strings you would have to get a new nut and bridge if you ever wanted to go back to steel strings.

    I am very enthusiastic about this new sampled acoustic upright bass with gut strings. It definitely sounds much more percussive than any other available sampled acoustic bass, which all have steel strings.

    This new acoustic upright bass from Bardstown Audio is being package as both 24 bit 96k and 24 bit 48k instruments, so the user can make his or her choice as to what sample rates they prefer to use. In the package there are also stereo versions in addition to mono cardioid and mono omni mic'ing versions at both sample rates. This new bass will be available in Giga 3, EXS24, HALion, and Kontakt/Kompakt sampler formats. There will be two packaged versions for this acoustic bass from Bardstown Audio... a packaged Giga version, and a separate packaged version which includes EXS24, HALion, and Kontakt/Kompakt. The reason for two separate packaged versions is because the sampled wave files in the Giga version are all embedded inside of the .gig files, whereas with HALion, EXS24, and Kontakt/Kompakt, the samples are all sitting in organized files and folders.

    I am currently trying to decide whether or not I should also include 16 bit 48k versions in the packaged Giga version for people who are still using Giga 2.x. Have most Giga users already upgraded to Giga 3, or if not, will most Giga 2 users be upgrading to Giga 3 anytime soon? I would appreciate some feedback on this Giga 2.x issue.

    Kindest regard,

    Kip McGinnis
    Bardstown Audio
    www.bardstownaudio.com

  3. #3

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    (I was just thinking of all those Baldwin samples sitting around on a hard disk, unplayed. And I don't think there is a Baldwin for Giga.)

    Looking forward to hearing the bass.

  4. #4
    hv
    Guest

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    Hi, Kip. Figured if someone was going to break the ice and jump into higher sample rates, it'd be you! The DVD and film folks are gonna love you. But I'd suggest you also consider co-releasing in down-sampled 44.1K versions too. Seeing as how you're on the cutting edge and folks aren't likely to have their other libraries at 48K or 96K yet, many will have a tough time of it unless they have multiple gs3 machines or interfaces.

    Don't know what to suggest about gs2. Lots of folks still have it on their "other" machine, like their laptops, but gs3's been so good I bit the bullet and upgraded all mine.

    Howard

  5. #5
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Dallas, Texas
    Posts
    5,755

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    At this juncture, I'd say anyone running GigaStudio 2.x is NUTS.

    But nevertheless, I'd say that a 44.1/48 khz bass is more than sufficient for my personal tastes. I would be unlikely to opt for the increased streaming load on a bass. However, the considerable programming advantages make me prefer native GS3 over GS2 format.

    However, a GS3 user could easily downsample the library with one click, so it's logically killing two birds with one stone to opt for the higher rate, and simply let the user downsample at his discretion.

    It would probably do people some good to learn the Giga editor anyway!! So many folks don't realize how much power is in that thing.

    EDIT: Oops. Brain fart. I see you're including both **rates**, just wondering whether to include both sample depths. Per the above, a GS3 user could downsample to 16-bit at the touch of a button, so it's only relevant for GS2 users to answer this...sorry.

    Will GS2 even open a GS3 file, though? I've never tried it. Never looked back...

  6. #6

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    Bruce, GS2 will not open a GS3 file, though it does see it. Says it's the wrong format. I'm still on 2.5 just because I've spent most of my equipment budget on video and greenscreen gear, but I still want to keep GS2.5 for all the 16-bit libs that I won't need to convert. (Plus I keep reading about Tascam being so slow to ship upgrades. Has that changed, or are we still in the 'pay now, play much later mode'?
    Dasher
    -------
    It's all about the music - really. I keep telling myself that...

  7. #7

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    I think there's one gut string upright bass lib on the market: KHSS's bass pizz.

    It doesn't have all of the articulations that people would want for a jazz bass, but it works really well for simple meat and potato stuff. Then again, iit doesn't really do the job under the spotlight. Of course, it wasn't intended to. And yes, it's more percussive with less sustain than most other options.

    Kip, it will be cool to have a nice gut upright with a full set of articulations. Best of luck with your new lib!

    -JF

  8. #8

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    Regarding GS3/GS2.5, I think it depends on the programming.

    If you can use the GS3 features, like iMIDI and more dimensions, to make the lib playable in real time, go for GS3 and don't look back. If GS2.5 covers the planned programming, do a GS2.5 version and possibly a 24-bit GS3 version, if you can just drop in the wave files and "save as".

    -JF

  9. #9

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    All software samplers, including Giga, HALion, EXS24, and Kontakt/Kompakt, do sample rate conversions on the fly. If you are working in a 24 bit 44.1 session, any of these samplers will take a 24 bit 48k sampled instrument and convert it to 24 bit 44.1k. You just want to make sure that you have the options in these samplers set to 32 bit float and SR conversion set to best or highest quality. If these options are not available in certain samplers such as Kontakt, that is because they are already set to these settings by default.

    Kip McGinnis
    Bardstown Audio
    www.bardstownaudio.com

  10. #10

    Re: What ever happened to the planned Bardstown Baldwin?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bardstown Audio

    I am currently trying to decide whether or not I should also include 16 bit 48k versions in the packaged Giga version for people who are still using Giga 2.x. Have most Giga users already upgraded to Giga 3, or if not, will most Giga 2 users be upgrading to Giga 3 anytime soon? I would appreciate some feedback on this Giga 2.x issue.

    Kindest regard,

    Kip McGinnis
    Bardstown Audio
    www.bardstownaudio.com
    Can't wait to hear this bass. I own all the Bardstown samples, and in case anyone doesn't know, these products are the *best of the best* in sample libraries. The new G3 24 Bosendorfer is simply incredible.

    I held off on upgrading for quite some time. G2 is a pretty rock solid app, and I didn't really need G3. I have noticed a superior sonic quality to 24 bit samples over 16 bit...but I had planned on gradually moving over to Halion and skip the whole G3 altogether. But I ended up moving to G3, and I'm glad I did. I just can't seem to navigate around and get as much done in the other samplers. Gigapulse is nice, but the sheer number of libraries available for G3 makes it practically a necessity for me.

    I don't know the cost of having a separate product line solely for G2, but it seems to me it would be a losing proposition. I can only speak for myself, but even if I did not own G3 and still had G2, I would be hesitant to order a product specifically for G2...

    But whatever you decide Kip, I wish you all the best.

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •