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Topic: A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

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  1. #1

    A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

    Hi Im new to gigastudio, been writing old fashioned just until recently when a fellow composer introduced me to the gigastudio platform.

    Ive bought a pretty good computer and Cubase SX and a few sample libs to get me started.
    My question to you is about articulation. How do they work, if I for example would like a legato string patch and then the next couple of notes want it to to be staccato? Would i have to record them to a seperate midi channel or can I somehow change the art on the fly?

    Giganoob [img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img]

    A.Wald

  2. #2

    Re: A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

    It depends on the library and how it\'s been programmed (or it depends on how you re-program it).

    For instance, I have some woodwind libraries from Xsamples. I load just one sample file in a Giga channel that might be named something like \"Oboe C#1-A1\". This means that if I press the C#1 key on my controller I have one kind of articulation (let\'s say legato). If I press the D1 key on the controller, then the articulation changes to staccato. D#1 changes to another artc., etc. all the way up to the A1 key there will be different sample articulations or effects triggered. This ability to use keys to change samples is called \"Keyswitching\"

    So, if you purchase libraries that have this keyswitching programmed then you can change the art. on the fly or just play it in (after all these lower keyswitching notes won\'t make any sound...they just switch to whatever sample(s) is programmed for that key.

    I should also add that the same kind of sample change can be made with the mod wheel or foot pedal. For example. mod wheel in lower position triggers marimba forte hits...in middle position it triggers pianissimo hits...in full forweard position it could trigger a roll...etc.

    So, check out your libraries and see if these functions have been programmed in.

    If they haven\'t been programmed in the library you could do it yourself (hopefully someone more experienced in that area could chime in here and explain).

    And worst case scenario (if noone else chimes in to explain how) is you\'ll have to load in different art. in different channels (just like the ol\' days).

  3. #3

    Re: A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

    In cakewalk, I simply use the Insert Bank/Patch change at the desired point on the seleted track. Then I select from a list of all available patches. So one midi track is enough to cover all articulations!

    I am sure you can do the same thing with other sequencers.

    Without this feature, I can imagine how painful it can get (I am a baby in this so am not used to the old fashioned way!)


    Originally posted by Veldt:
    if I for example would like a legato string patch and then the next couple of notes want it to to be staccato? Would i have to record them to a seperate midi channel or can I somehow change the art on the fly?

    Giganoob [img]images/icons/rolleyes.gif[/img]

    A.Wald
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">

  4. #4

    Re: A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

    I forgot to add that you do not need key switched samples for this to work. They are more useful when you are playing from the MIDI keyboard.

  5. #5

    Re: A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

    Thanks for your very informative answers I actually thought this was the process, but I wanted some feedback from pro\'s.

    Regards,
    A.Wald

  6. #6

    Re: A question about gigastudio and sequencer editing

    Originally posted by Veldt:
    ... but I wanted some feedback from pro\'s.
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">Veldt,
    The other alternative not mentioned is to write your melody, or whatever, into one track then copy it to as many tracks as you have articulations, then delete the notes that do not pertain to that articulation. So, for your example, you would have two sequencer tracks and each articulation loaded it\'s own GS channel. This has the advantage of loading fewer voices in GS e.g. a Dan Dean Solo Violin Keyswitched instrument might have five articulations. Even though you only use two, you are actually loading five, which cause more memory allocation (see memory usage meter). Another situation where splitting is useful is if you have the VSL performance tool on another machine (for legato) and the staccato samples on a different machine. Your tracks have to be set to target different MidiOuts. Also, if you feel you want to have different verb, eq or whatever for each articulation, track splitting is the only way to do it. From reading this forum, I believe many pros use both methods. I\'m not a pro though. It would be interesing to here from more of them to see how they work.

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