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Topic: OT: Jazz Piano

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  1. #1

    OT: Jazz Piano

    hi guys, with all these jazz library talk I feel that i should learn more piano styles.

    what I am looking for is a sheet music book with some jazz classics for piano. i have searched around and found a lot of them. BUT:

    i hate it when they only notate the right hand staff and some chord for the left hand. is there a good book that is notated with classical piano notation????

    thanx in advance

  2. #2

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    This is probably not what you want to hear, but you're better off learning jazz notation... Playing jazz music in a classical style, isn't really going to help you learn to play jazz. It will just teach you how to playing jazzy sounding chords.

    However, that said, there is a book called

    "A Classical Approach to Jazz Piano" by Dominic Alldis, which I bought for my gf, who was trying to learn some jazz basics.

    I'd recommend it, it does a good job of translating between the classical <-> jazz concepts and jargon.

    HTH

  3. #3

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    Quote Originally Posted by lulu
    hi guys, with all these jazz library talk I feel that i should learn more piano styles.

    what I am looking for is a sheet music book with some jazz classics for piano. i have searched around and found a lot of them. BUT:

    i hate it when they only notate the right hand staff and some chord for the left hand. is there a good book that is notated with classical piano notation????

    thanx in advance

    Lulu,

    learning Jazz Piano is not at all a science, it is a matter of constant listening and working out chords and runs by yourself with a good discipline of fingerings. Oscar Perterson is an excellent start along with the late Bill Evans. Jazz unlike classical does break many of the traditional chord rules but it is a unique genre in itself. Getting hung on other great pianist runs is worth while for your ears and fingers but respecting your own creations and sticking with them helps you to develop your own unique style of playing jazz.

    The Keyboard Musician magazine offers some worthwhile notations monthly. You'll need a good virtual piano sample and there are many out there. My choice is the Bardstownaudio Imperial Grand Piano at Bardstownaudio.com I've done many samples for Kip in the small and large Jazz group settings.

    Stay in touch and I'm sure all of us Jazz Gurus can offer some postive advice.

    Alan Russell
    Please Visit My New & Revised Official Website Below

    http://AlanRussell-Music.com

  4. #4

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    Hi lulu

    I started of on guitar, but i had a fascination with the piano, anyway by far the best thing to do is listen and transcribe, but if you want a very good method of looking at the history of jazz piano John Meehagan series i found very good its 4 volumes and explains the basics, and looks at the styles of Bill Evans, Petersen , Art Tatum, the swing masters, bebop masters etc
    but its getting a bit old now and its been a long time since i thought about the subject so it would be dated in certain areas.

  5. #5

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    Stride style playing (Scott Joplin is the foremost name here) features notated left hand work that is usually notated on a separate staff. It's a old and a basic form of jazz music, but it might serve as an introduction. Also, get your hat blown off by pianist Art Tatum

    Besides of that, jazz playing is pretty much based upon the idea that the chords are there to tell you the harmonies and the form of the song. What you do and how you use that information and how you apply it on the instrument, is almost completely ad lib .. real time ad lib. That's why you don't find anything else notated besides the chords, the melody line and the most characteristic accents of the song in question. The notation used in the jazz bible - The Real Book - is pretty much the notation you should expect on a gig.
    Kid: When I become an adult I wanna be a musician.
    Parent: Son, you cannot become both.

  6. #6

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    Hi, Lulu. Jazz piano for the classical player is largely learning to free yourself of whatever preconceptions you have about music performance. Absolute accuracy is not as important as emotion and innovation. Rhythmic feel is more significant than chord substitution. Learn the common harmonic forms, e.g., blues, blues with a bridge, 'rhythm' changes (I Got Rhythm, but without the tag at the end, oddly enough) etc. Then listen to great jazz players as mentioned above playing these tunes. See how they develop chordal background accompaniment, how they answer each other, how the standard improvisational forms evolve throuhg a song., In other words, Listen. Listen again. Then listen some more. Listen till you know the solos and harmonies clearly, without actually notating them.

    Then steal those ideas! It's OK, every jazz player began by stealing his idol's lines and way to approach a melody. Most great players rely on vocabulary as much as instant innovation, Miles Davis once said, "Eight good bars a night is enough." He didn't mean it was OK to sound terrible the rest of the night, he was saying that if he could come up with something new, original and that made a statement for eight bars each night, he was still creating and growing.

    But mainly, allow your body to tell you where you are within the form, and let it tell you how to GROOVE! Jazz that doesn't groove isn't jazz, it's lounge improv at best and painful at worst. If it is a swing groove, then swing hard and mightily, if it's Latin, burn that montuno! Jazz is a lusty music, and needs to be played larger than life. This is frequently the most difficult part, the concept of playing right on the edge of control, both technical and emotional.

    No fear. Good luck.
    Dasher
    -------
    It's all about the music - really. I keep telling myself that...

  7. #7

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    Lulu,

    Everyone's gotta start somewhere, and while the good folks here are well-meaning, you were really asking for a book of jazz piano arrangements.

    Go to sheetmusicplus dot com and look up Bill Boyd's "Great Jazz Standards". It's fully notated (both hands) with great voicings and swinging arrangements. It's the book that ushered me into the world of jazz piano and I haven't looked back. You'll really enjoy it.

    Jazzbozo

  8. #8

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    you could also try looking around here

    http://www.pgmusic.com/

    check their products i have heard some of their jazz stuff and its realy well done

  9. #9

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    jazzbozo,

    just for the record, teh book I suggested teaches one how to translate fake book -esque chords into something a classical player would understand.


  10. #10

    Re: OT: Jazz Piano

    Also check out Frank Mantooth's book. A very easy-to-understand method of building jazz voicings. You'll sound like a jazz player in no time
    Careful, man, there's a beverage here!
    www.stevegoers.com

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