• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 25

Topic: Chord Progressions

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Chord Progressions

    Does anyone know where to find a list of chord progressions used in classical music. I don't mean the chords that typically go with a particular scale, but something more advanced. Even if it's only a list of chords that resolve into one another, that would be helpful.

  2. #2

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Quote Originally Posted by rageangel
    Does anyone know where to find a list of chord progressions used in classical music. I don't mean the chords that typically go with a particular scale, but something more advanced. Even if it's only a list of chords that resolve into one another, that would be helpful.
    Hi, I'd love to help (and I'm a theory-junkie so I should be able to help!) but I'm not sure what your question is.... could you be a bit more specific? Maybe you can tell us what the context is for this is? Chord changes, and cool resolutions, are totally my bag, so I'd love to help if I can!

    Steve Main
    Steve Main
    stmain@aol.com
    www.stephenmain.com

  3. #3

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Basic western harmony:
    For Major and Natural Minor (harmonic is frequently used, because of the leading tone...)

    Triads (Major), I iii vi IV ii V I
    (C Major) C Em Am F Dm G C

    (Minor), i III VI iv iib5 V(Leading tone) i
    (A minor) Am C F Dm Bmb5 E A

    Usually the V chord is spelled V7 (Dominant) for major and minor:
    G B D F (in C Maj)
    E G# B D (In A min, G# is the leading tone)

    The viib5 can be used instead of V (actually V7 minus the root...) for Major.
    In minor the viib5 is diminished due to the leading tone (G#) B D in A minor.

    Dominants push toward a tonic and can be used to modulate to a new key (or never get there!!!) allowing for any number of possible resolutions.

    C F7 Bb7 Eb7 Ab7 Db7 Gb7 B7(enharmonic equivalent ) E7 A7 D7 G7 C......
    (notice I just modulated through 12 different keys).

    It just goes on from here

    Hope this helps.

  4. #4

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Thanks for the theory. One question: what do these symbols mean/what notes/chords do they refer to?
    Quote Originally Posted by robertb
    I iii vi IV ii V I
    Thanks!

  5. #5

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Quote Originally Posted by imagegod
    Thanks for the theory. One question: what do these symbols mean/what notes/chords do they refer to?

    Thanks!
    In the Key of C:
    I = C Major
    ii = D minor
    iii = E minor
    IV = F Major
    V = G Major
    vi = A minor
    vii = Bminor b5

    These numbers basically refer to the scale tones. Anyone for cadences?

  6. #6

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Point of order: The triad built on the seventh scale degree is referred to as a diminished chord, not a minor-b5. "Flat-5" refers to an altered tone, but the fifth is not lowered from its diatonic position.

    vii = Bdim
    - Jamie Kowalski

    All Hands Music - Kowalski on the web
    The Ear Is Always Correct - Writings on composition

  7. #7

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Skysaw
    Point of order: The triad built on the seventh scale degree is referred to as a diminished chord, not a minor-b5. "Flat-5" refers to an altered tone, but the fifth is not lowered from its diatonic position.

    vii = Bdim

    You are correct. Please excuse me. I was thinking diminished and writing b5, must be getting old

  8. #8

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Thanks guys! I'm a composer who works from the heart...theory and I don't mix. But basic stuff like this could come in real handy!

    Again, thanks alot!!

  9. #9

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Here is how I transition up a major third starting in C maj:

    C maj melody note: E
    F maj melody note: F
    D min melody note: F
    E maj melody note: E


    And another:
    C maj melody note: E
    Eb maj melody note: Eb
    G maj melody note: D
    A maj melody note: C#

    This one's kinda weird, but it'll work if you have a more modern chromatic feel to your music. And the melody notes are just suggestions.

    Chris

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Los Angeles
    Posts
    380

    Re: Chord Progressions

    Quote Originally Posted by Skysaw
    Point of order: The triad built on the seventh scale degree is referred to as a diminished chord, not a minor-b5. "Flat-5" refers to an altered tone, but the fifth is not lowered from its diatonic position.vii = Bdim
    Interesting that I had this very discussion last night.

    If you add the natural 7th to each of the triads of the diatonic scale (I M7, ii m7, iii m7 etc.) the vii (in the Key of C) does produce (what's called) Bm7 b5 and not a full diminished chord. Without the added 7th you do have Bdim. The point that the triad is an unaltered chord (Bdim) I would agree is the paramount issue theory-wise.

    So everyone is right here, in a way.

    dpc

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •