• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Topic: 1st OPEN LECTURE: HOW AND WHY READING MUSIC

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Arrow 1st OPEN LECTURE: HOW AND WHY READING MUSIC

    In the Academy we found people that have good musical experience or big love, but still not reading or not easily reading music.

    My invitation is: do you want to improve your creativity and composition techniques? Then you MUST learn reading music.
    Questions: how? and Why?

    I begin with the second WHY:
    It's obvious that writing and reading is a necessary way to communicate, and teaching is impossible without communication. Classical music writing is not the only way today to exchange music. But the waveform of an audio-file is not really communicative for instance. A midi file is understandable only if you are already a good computer musician. Then...

    You may forget that classical music theory is the base of classical composition study. The good reason is IMO:
    because the composition is a combinatory work. What you combine are notes, and you need to know how notes are visualised together in every format, from the MIDI list to the Score and vice versa, from the score to the MIDI list.

    If you think that some MIDI format is enough, but you are not able reading classical music notation, you are probably wrong.

    The classic way of music writing is elegant and a little redundant because it's ancient. But it's extremely rational and useful to describe the notes combination, at least as MIDI graphics. But because people is editing and publishing music using notation and not MIDI graphics, I think that it's better to learn the standard music notation before...

    But finally HOW?:

    To read music in real time singing or performing playing of whatever instrument is an ambitious target, requiring a lot of time and will.

    Reading music even slowly, even step by step, but correctly, is the base of writing.
    It's IMO a quick target for everyone.

    I posted in the resource thread good links to help you, and I'm available to personalise and guide your work suggesting the use and the focusing of the available tools.

    http://northernsounds.com/forum/showthread.php?t=32168

    Just contact me, to start the course.

  2. #2

    Re: 1st OPEN LECTURE: HOW AND WHY READING MUSIC

    I agree, Maestro! Thank you for the links!

    Here's a thought for you (or anyone else): Sight Singing is a good way to both reinforce one's ability to read music and train the ears. Personally, I use the "moveable Do" system (solfeggio where the tonic is always DO). The thought is that one should learn to sightread with a system like moveable DO but also take the time after the sightreading to memorize the music being sightread with the emphasis on how each note relates to the tonic, concentrating on how each note functions in relation to the tonic or other notes. As an example, listening to how active tones such as "FA" or "TI" resolve, either directly or indirectly.

    I think this will help people learn to better hear the music that is being sight-read.
    I remain solely responsible for the content of my messages, and agree to indemnify and hold harmless northern sound source, and their agents with respect to any claim based upon transmission of my message(s). Rock on.

  3. #3

    Thumbs up Re: 1st OPEN LECTURE: HOW AND WHY READING MUSIC

    Quote Originally Posted by wes37
    I agree, Maestro! Thank you for the links!

    Here's a thought for you (or anyone else): Sight Singing is a good way to both reinforce one's ability to read music and train the ears. Personally, I use the "moveable Do" system (solfeggio where the tonic is always DO). The thought is that one should learn to sightread with a system like moveable DO but also take the time after the sightreading to memorize the music being sightread with the emphasis on how each note relates to the tonic, concentrating on how each note functions in relation to the tonic or other notes. As an example, listening to how active tones such as "FA" or "TI" resolve, either directly or indirectly.

    I think this will help people learn to better hear the music that is being sight-read.
    Yes, this is not only a good training for singer reading notation, but as you say, it's helping you to understand the "function" of scale steps.

    I recomend this method to music educators. The bad side is that it requires a tutor during live sessions to help you correcting immediately and singing together.

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •