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Topic: How do you deliver your stuff?

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  1. #1

    How do you deliver your stuff?

    How do you deliver your drafts, parts or complete work to the final stage in making use of the music - such as mixing into video, mounting onto mag track or simply mastering for a CD album?

    I often use my webserver for this, where the people can download the stuff directly - both partly finished drafts and also the finished material. In other cases I usually deliver it on DVD or CD, through mail or directly in their hand. As for drafts the server is great. I just mount a draft mix onto the video part I'm working on atm and publish a "web-quality" video file on the server and the guys watch it while on the phone with me. Not so personal, but very efficient.

    For theater or movie use I usually deliver things split up into very small parts, such as instrument groups or even single instruments sometimes if mixing is going to be done by another guy. Also, the different parts are divided into "slices" where each sequence of music is separated from the next one and the one that came before. Small parts is usually favoured by the other guys since it gives them more freedom in using it - you know, fading in/out, taking out the drums if they like that better or mixing the drums in low if it gets in the way of the dialogue or background sounds .. etc.

    The ways of delivery varies of course. One common factor for me is wav 24 bit 48 khz. Thinking of this made me curious to how you guys deliver your stuff? Anybody still into DAT for example?
    Kid: When I become an adult I wanna be a musician.
    Parent: Son, you cannot become both.

  2. #2

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    Everything you said, except for DAT. Oh - and I'll put up drafts of cues on my FTP site using high through-put mp3.

    Good Topic! I'm curious about how the other guys deliver roughs and finals.
    Houston Haynes - Titan Line Music

  3. #3

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomke
    For theater or movie use I usually deliver things split up into very small parts, such as instrument groups or even single instruments sometimes if mixing is going to be done by another guy. Also, the different parts are divided into "slices" where each sequence of music is separated from the next one and the one that came before. Small parts is usually favoured by the other guys since it gives them more freedom in using it - you know, fading in/out, taking out the drums if they like that better or mixing the drums in low if it gets in the way of the dialogue or background sounds .. etc.

    The ways of delivery varies of course. One common factor for me is wav 24 bit 48 khz. Thinking of this made me curious to how you guys deliver your stuff? Anybody still into DAT for example?
    I never deliver anything except a finished mix. I do deliver each cue separately, but they are usually placed at the correct point in a ProTools session. I wouldn't want some dubbing engineer changing the mix to suit him/herself. I was asked once to deliver dry mixes for each section of the orchestra. I laughed and said "no".

    Daryl

  4. #4

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    I deliver everything on CD-Rom or DVD.

    For tv, everything is delivered stereo mix (interleaved), 48Khz/24 bit. With very light limiting to squash any over-0 peaks. Of course, the individual cues in the mix might have been compressed anywhere from a bit to a lot, depending on the content.

    For film, the format is the same, although I have occasionally been asked to deliver in 16bit. I'll usually divide up the tracks this way, remembering that most mixers don't want too many music tracks, due to their lack of time: melodic instrument(s), strings/pads/accompanying elements, drums/orch or ethnic percs, bass. If there are also more sound design-type elements, like electroacoustic textures, I'll put them on a separate track as well. The point, IMV, is not to give the mixer the option of re-mixing your track for aesthetic reasons, but rather give the director the option to take out certain elements that might obscur the dialogue, and to give the mixer the option to re-balance my mix in an excellent room.

    I also place a 1-frame, -18dB, 1K beep at -2 seconds from start.

  5. #5

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by Daryl
    I was asked once to deliver dry mixes for each section of the orchestra. I laughed and said "no".
    Well, considering the number of times that my music has been drowned by the mixer's added reverb, I'm considering handing in dry stuff for certain mixers...

  6. #6

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    yep...I ftp everything. More and more I am getting picture delivered to me that way too, which works great. One related question I have though...do you uploaders use a seperate computer to upload and download files? Is there any advantage speed-wise to doing so?

    Rob

  7. #7

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ned Bouhalassa
    Well, considering the number of times that my music has been drowned by the mixer's added reverb, I'm considering handing in dry stuff for certain mixers...
    If they want to add reverb they will add reverb, but at least I know that the mix was good when it left my hands and will sound the same on any soundtrack album.

    Daryl

  8. #8

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    I deliver in the same ways as mentioned by you fine folk. I upload my drafts to a "client" page in mp3 format along with a video for each cue. When it comes time to deliver the final, I mix it at 48Khz/24 bit and send it out on CD ROM.

    When I receive picture though, it's generally through the mail.
    David Bateman
    www.davidbateman.net

  9. #9

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    Cassette tape sent via carrier pigeon - isn't that the standard anymore?

    Well, ok.....ftp. Rob, I always use a seperate computer for transferring and then just network transfer the stuff into my DAW.

    CD is still often required so I've got a masterlink for 24bit CD which I rely on for this purpose but its becoming ever more redundant. DVD is used too.

    DAT I never liked much to begin with and am glad to see the back of it.
    Trev Parks

  10. #10

    Re: How do you deliver your stuff?

    I never deliver anything except a finished mix. I do deliver each cue separately, but they are usually placed at the correct point in a ProTools session. I wouldn't want some dubbing engineer changing the mix to suit him/herself. I was asked once to deliver dry mixes for each section of the orchestra. I laughed and said "no".

    Daryl,

    You seem to exist on a different plane than one that the majority of us has to deal with on a daily basis. Could you give us some details on your background and the type of projects that you work on? Most of us simply don't have many options with dealing with what the producers and directors contractually demand...but you seem to be the one who dictates the rules....what's up?
    >>Kays
    http://www.musicbykays.com
    Music Composition for Feature Films, Television and Interactive Entertainment

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