• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Topic: Will you still respect me in the morning?

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Talking Will you still respect me in the morning?

    I hate loops.

    I hate the fact that someone can cut and paste a piece of music(?) together in Acid and have people say "Wow, you write great music!"

    I pride myself on the fact that I don't use them. These ten little fingers are all I need to create my own drums, basslines, orchestral passages, etc. Queen used to put the phrase "No Synthesizers" on their albums. My phrase is "no loops". (now if I only had an album to put it on ; )

    Recently I heard Harry Gregson-Williams' "Man On Fire" soundtrack. Lovely lush orchestral passages that morph into bombastic salsa flourishes. Biting, scratchy noises that segue into beautiful spanish nylon guitar. Loop-like elements that come and go but add so much to this brilliant sound track. (Harry, if your out there, I'll be your monkey boy protege anyday!)

    I want to try and write like that. The question is does Harry write all of those edgy little transitional pieces or does he fire up a few loops?

    I'm being seduced by the dark side! I've been flirting with Altered States, Adrenaline, etc. EWQL Gold has found some loop lipstick on my collar. I stay up late at night forsaking a solo cello sample for an mp3 full of grit and anger. I dig for money in the couches of people I don't even know and find myself driving past convenience stores that aren't exactly on the way home.

    Should I cave in? (Queen did) Is it OK to use loops? Do you? Which ones are the best? Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Darren ; )

  2. #2

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Theres nothing wrong with it. As they say, friends do not let friends use presets . Just grabbing a few loops and slappingin there and calling that done aint right. Its taking the time to be inventive with whats there, taking advantage of the various processing tools and layering it with other loops & samples. It surprises me what those folks manage do with the supplied stuff in the FL demo projects.

  3. #3

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    I did a film project. It required a lot of Spanish music and orchestral stuff. I did all the orchestral parts myself as I'm set up to do that. The spanish stuff I tried. Couldn't afford to hire a brass section. Couldn't afford to hire a percussion section. I looped away using demo acid loops and put in Spanish guitar overdubs played by a friend.
    Sounded great!!!

    The director loved it. Sounded like Cuba.

    4 months later he said that he heard "my piece" on a TV show. Same loops I told him I'm sure. Sometimes it's better to go live with what you got rather than give 'em loops that everybody has access to. Thinking back on it, doing guitar overdubs and a bass and hiring one spanish perc player to play conga and bongo would have been better. I probably didn't need the brass after all.

    Now I'm looking into Stylus RMX for it's editing capabilities. And as far as looped music phrases.....never,ever,ever again. Learned my lesson.

    Cheers,


    Jose

  4. #4

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Here's my take on loops. I really don't mind using them if they present an efficient and easy (and let's be frank, cost effective) way of getting a particular musical idea across. I also don't share the general "loop snob" philosophy that if you're going to stoop down and use loops you gotta process the crap out of them. I think the whole reason for buying loops is that they sound great out of the box! Take Stylus RMX for example, hands down the best purchase I've made this year, everytime I try to be creative and process the loops through some crazy Logic filter or rearrange them in some bizarre way, they always end up sounding worse, different but IMHO not as good as the original versions. So I always end up messing around with the loop for about an hour until I decide that it sounded so good coming out of the box that I might as well use it as is....that is afterall the whole idea why I bought Stylus in the first place, it sounds great as is!

    As far as anyone recognizing the loops or (god forbid) using the same ones in another piece, I say this...nobody outside of the musician community would ever recognize a certain loop. So while I hear known samples and loops on TV all the time, I know that my wife or my friends have no idea. We (the music industry folk) are not the audience, regular people are and regular people have better things to do with their time than to figure out that a certain loop that they hear on Alias is the same one in that VW commercial.

    Musicians bug other musicians not to use presets, friends don't really care.


    Disclaimer:
    Don't misunderstand the above post as a statement against being creative or doing interesting things with your samples, it is simply meant to dispel this belief that it is wrong to use anything out of the box as is.
    >>Kays
    http://www.musicbykays.com
    Music Composition for Feature Films, Television and Interactive Entertainment

  5. #5

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Now I'm looking into Stylus RMX for it's editing capabilities. And as far as looped music phrases.....never,ever,ever again. Learned my lesson.
    Aww, come on Jose...the example that happened to you is extremely rare. I mean while it is possible that a similar enough piece might be recognized by a director, I doubt that anyone else who is not as intimately familiar with the music would ever even think about something like that.
    The other point is that it sounds like the budget and timeframe probably didn't allow you to go out and hire a bunch of latin session guys and a good studio. I think that you shouldn't feel bad at all for using the best tools that were available to you at the time to accomplish what the film needed, even if some of those tools were not unique to your usage.
    >>Kays
    http://www.musicbykays.com
    Music Composition for Feature Films, Television and Interactive Entertainment

  6. #6

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Yeah you're right midphase. I shouldn't use terms like never ever.

    It was really fun being an arranger of loops rather than a composer for a change. I think that if I had the live instruments I would have used the same rhythms with only slight modifications anyway as it really did sound very authentic.

    Cheers,

    Jose

  7. #7

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Quote Originally Posted by dpasdernick
    I hate loops.
    I love loops. But I create my own....
    --
    Robert Gregory Browne
    KISS HER GOODBYE (now available)
    KILLER YEAR: Stories to Die For (Jan. 2008)
    WHISPER IN THE DARK (2008)
    St. Martin's Press
    http://www.robertgregorybrowne.com

  8. #8

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    I dont totally stay away from loops, but I certainly play the orchestral material myself. If a project has a limited time frame, sure I throw down a couple of loops, tweak them, and continue on for the sake of time. Stylus definately helps aid the changing of loops and adds the ability to make them your own which is very cool. Though what really gets me are the "composers" who come along and through down 3 or 4 loops in Acid or God forbid... Ejay and call that original music. Ive met a good chunk of people who are wanting to get into scoring video games and all they use is acid, video game music has definately come along way and acid alone (in my opinion) wont cut it these days. Loop based music may sound cool, I just dont think it will work by itself... almost anyone can throw down a loop or 2.

    Rich

  9. #9

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    I don't care for loops and for some of the same reasons as others.

    Still they have a place (small one though).

    I've used them for the limited ambient/minimal stuff. Beyond that I've no use for 'em.

  10. #10

    Re: Will you still respect me in the morning?

    Quote Originally Posted by josejherring
    4 months later he said that he heard "my piece" on a TV show.
    A proper response might have been:

    "What! They can't steal from me! What show!? Whose the producer?!? They'll never get away with it if I have something to say about it!"

    I knew a producer who routinely said to composers he'd heard their music before just to see what they'd answer.

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •