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Topic: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

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  1. #1

    An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Ok, it is already 6 years old, but I found it very interesting, so maybe someone else does do - especially since the topic "Zimmer" always seems to bring up a fierce debate between Zimmer lovers and haters here.

    http://www.cinemusic.net/spotlight/1...interview.html

    Michael

  2. #2

    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Very interesting! Thanks for the link! Mr. Zimmer is one of my favorites.
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

  3. #3

    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Glad you liked it.
    Here is another one where he mentions his lack in formal musical training:


    DC: How do you and Shirley Walker get on?

    HZ: I love Shirley because I don't have to talk to her. We have telepathic communication. The problems I have with the score and the orchestra are never anything to do with Shirley, it is always to do with my writing. She will interpret exactly everything I've written, without me even having to talk to her about it.

    DC: That's harmonious, the way you seem to play off each other without extensive verbal communication...

    HZ: The thing is, I never went to music school and all that stuff. I had my two weeks of piano lessons and the teacher couldn't cope with me. So that was that. And then the thing with Shirley, she hasn't got the arrogance a normal orchestrator would have. They would take my score and say, "this is all wrong ! These notes are all wrong. This is not the way you are supposed to do it." Shirley knows I hear something in my head and that is what I write down on paper and that is how I want to hear it, so she doesn't play music teacher with me, which a lot of other people would do. So all that stuff makes me sound like Hans Zimmer. Because theoretically I think it's all wrong - I do a lot of parallell fifths that you're not supposed to do. My octaves are all over the place, you know, things doubling on octaves all the time.

    DC: But it still works in a way.

    HZ: It works. It's just me. It's what I hear in my head.

    from
    http://ifiji.com/yumbo/zoard/flyer.htm

  4. #4

    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    "I do a lot of parallell fifths that you're not supposed to do."

    hahahahaa

    I do this a lot and I wonder why people always say you're not supposed to do.

    I just hate pre-establish rules for something so unpredictable as music.
    There should be no rules or preconceived ideas for the expression of the human heart.

  5. #5
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    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    wierd purists, because like music now is anything and everything. Man can you hate Zimmer the guy has written 100 and some films(and i can't even find work for one LOL) Parallel fiths octaves, dimished fiths on minor seconds, who cares. It's been done so it's alright. What they dont' like is V to I music (you know the whole classical master works are made up of it) so why not block up the harmony with the brass and winds(hey Debussy did it all the time)
    go for it! I say...oh Cool Read. Read it before I think but forgot.
    All I can Say is...HA!...HA!...HAAAAAAA!!!!!

  6. #6

    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    No formal training? That's pretty inspiring, as I do not yet have formal training either . . . except I think Mr. Zimmer was in a band, was he? Kinda like Danny Elfman: no training, just in a band and was in the right place and the right time. Still, that's something I didn't know.
    Sean Patrick Hannifin
    My MP3s | My Melody Generator | my album
    "serious music" ... as if the rest of us are just kidding

  7. #7

    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Quote Originally Posted by StrangeCat
    Man can you hate Zimmer the guy has written 100 and some films(and i can't even find work for one LOL) Parallel fiths octaves, dimished fiths on minor seconds, who cares. It's been done so it's alright. What they dont' like is V to I music (you know the whole classical master works are made up of it) so why not block up the harmony with the brass and winds(hey Debussy did it all the time)
    go for it! I say...oh Cool Read. Read it before I think but forgot.
    Yeah but if you read carefully you'll find that he admits that a lot of really high profile films where done by other composers.

    So maybe he's only done about 50. Not so impressive now.....oh who I'm a kidding I'd give my left nut for 1 of Bruckheimer's films.



    Jose

  8. #8

    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Quote Originally Posted by Nayi
    "I do a lot of parallell fifths that you're not supposed to do."

    hahahahaa

    I do this a lot and I wonder why people always say you're not supposed to do.

    I just hate pre-establish rules for something so unpredictable as music.
    There should be no rules or preconceived ideas for the expression of the human heart.
    That's only relevant if you're composing either in harmony or counterpoint. Ok lol...that's about all music. Anyway, the fun thing is that you have a set of rules which you can choose to use or to totally ignore. But you should first learn to use them before you learn to ignore them, IMO.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Quote Originally Posted by Nayi
    "I do a lot of parallell fifths that you're not supposed to do."

    hahahahaa

    I do this a lot and I wonder why people always say you're not supposed to do.

    I just hate pre-establish rules for something so unpredictable as music.
    There should be no rules or preconceived ideas for the expression of the human heart.
    I don't think it is so much that. Parallel fifths are a defect in a particular kind of chorale harmonization, because they create a stagnant motion for that particular style.

    There's no rule that says parellel fifths or any device can't be used to achieve whatever effect the composer is going for. There are no rules, really. That is a mischaracterization. Anything that is called a rule in music is more an observation of how musicians expressed themselves during definable periods of time and schools of thought. As time passes, the rules are amended, so to speak, and they "live" in that way. Those which prove themselves over time become guideposts.

    Even within a given period, you can break any rule you want. You must just have a musically compelling reason for doing it. The rules generally exist, in whatever form, because breaking them tends to make the music sound bad, and following them tends to make the music sound better. But it is how a person expresses himself within a boundary that expresses his artistry, anyway. It's the difference in an oil painting vs. a mixed media piece. If you're declaring something an oil painting, then you're producing an end work which is going to be constructed of oils, for better or worse. If you decide you're going to glue a milk carton onto it, and cover it with gold leaf, then that's no longer an oil painting...whether it's beautiful or not.

    Likewise, if you're scoring a four-part chorale in the late-Baroque style, you'll be using that accepted bag of tricks. Any expression is valid expression, it just won't be an expression of the particular style. But it's all good. Or bad. If it sounds good, it's good. If not, those rules are sometimes worth a try.

  10. #10
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    Re: An interesting interview with Hans Zimmer

    Quote Originally Posted by Nayi
    "I do a lot of parallell fifths that you're not supposed to do."

    hahahahaa

    I do this a lot and I wonder why people always say you're not supposed to do.

    I just hate pre-establish rules for something so unpredictable as music.
    There should be no rules or preconceived ideas for the expression of the human heart.
    How does the old saying go - "A little knowledge can be a dangerous thing"? I'm sure that Zimmer thinks he's a real trailblazer for using parallel perfect fifths, but all that he's doing is betraying his own ignorance on the matter. (And nevermind that parallel 5ths can be found in virtually every score by John Williams, as well as the fact that they have been routinely exploited by composers for over the last 100 years - Debussy, Ravel, Stravinsky, Holst, Vaughn-Williams, Copland, et al, the gang's all here.)

    Parallel and hidden 5ths were never a "rule", it was just a common practice, and a very good one for that particular framework. Some only see it as a rule because they look at it from a 20th century viewpoint, with 20th century ears.

    The perfect 5th appears very early in the harmonic series, and very prominently as well, not only as a perfect 5th with harmonics 2 and 3, but also as a perfect 12th with harmonics 1 and 3, and as such is a very foundational interval. This is why perfect 5ths were regularly sung in fact very early on by the Gregorian monks (that is, when they weren't pulling all-night keggers).

    Then at some point in the music of the late renaissance (however imperfectly these developments can be traced), as the concept of voiceleading was developing, they began to notice that wherever a perfect 5th would arise in the voiceleading, it would stick out like a sore thumb because it robbed the lines in question of their independence - not altogether removed from an octave doubling in fact.

    So, although the occassional perfect or hidden 5th can be found here and there in music of the common practice period, it was largely avoided as a *musical* matter, not an academic one, specifically because of the emphasis on the independence of the voices. But by the time the Romantic period was losing steam, the Impressionists picked up on the characteristic sound of the perfect 5th and began exploiting it for all it's worth.

    So it's not really about adhering to a set of dogmatic and arbitrary "rules", but rather it's about understanding the principles on which certain practices were based.

    For all of the complaints about parallel 5ths being a "rule" I've ever heard from people that didn't understand all this, I've often had to remind them that a considerable amount of great music was written with these principles in mind.
    Last edited by scottnorma; 04-18-2005 at 10:24 PM.

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