• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 9 of 9

Topic: mod wheel

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    mod wheel

    How can i get the mod wheel to stop resetting to o when i open my song in cubase sl 2.0
    Thanks

  2. #2

    Re: mod wheel

    Call the MOD Squad? Oh, that's us. Well, welcome to the forum Chris. Just place a little cc 1 data at the beginning of the track, and you're good to go. Go where? That's up to you. Anywho, just give that wheel a little bum before the music comes in. I hope this helps. Gosh, it's getting late and I've got to get some sleep.

    Karl

  3. #3

    Re: mod wheel

    Chris,

    Also, keep in mind that having the mod wheel reset to zero is usually an indication that you are not using mod wheel data as you should. It is not a "set and forget" controller. It is an expressive controller that should be in almost constant motion as you shape the contour of your lines in subtle (and not so subtle) ways. As an example, in wind instruments you should think of the mod wheel data as the airstream of the player. The air must be started before the first note, blown harder as notes get louder and backed off as notes get softer, and stopped entirely to take another breath. In strings, the mod wheel is analogous to drawing the bow across the strings to initiate the vibrations. If you use mod wheel data in this continuously expressive way you will not have the mod wheel inadvertently resetting to zero in your tracks.

    Tom

  4. #4

    Re: mod wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    In strings, the mod wheel is analogous to drawing the bow across the strings to initiate the vibrations. Tom
    Tom,
    I've been thinking of it as a volume parameter as a phrase sort of crescendos and decrescendos. Are you saying to make the mod wheel (CC#1) data correspond to to bowing? ie up and down a little as the bow goes back and forth?
    hmmm... interesting....

  5. #5

    Re: mod wheel

    I think he means that the modwheel is the equivalent to blowing air in a wind instrument or bow movement with a string instrument. The instruments don't sound until the player expends energy to create that sound and that energy varies constantly throughout the performance. Also note...the modwheel simulates tonal changes as well as changes volume. Tom will no doubt explain it better than I.

  6. #6

    Re: mod wheel

    jbraner spake thus: "I've been thinking of it as a volume parameter as a phrase sort of crescendos and decrescendos."

    Yeah, you've got it right.

    I believe Mr. Hopkins was merely referring to mod wheel data as a measure of how much force is being applied to the instrument's noise-making mechanism. In the case of a wind or brass instrument, this mechanism is manipulated by blowing air into the instrument, and with a string instrument, noise is made by "drawing the bow across the strings to initiate the vibrations."

    Velocity data tends to follow this line of thinking very closely... or at least, I tend to use it that way. I never played any wind instrument in my life... except for a recorder in fourth grade... BUT, for instance, I can't imagine playing a loud note (high mod wheel data) on a flute and not manage to accent that note (high velocity data), or at least give it an edgier, quicker attack than a softer note.

    Though I guess you could certainly change the expressive dynamics of a violin across the different bowstrokes... I've done that before, at any rate. But I don't think Mr. Hopkins specifically meant that realism in GPO calls for an up-down bowstroke and up-down mod wheel data correlation. If that's what you meant. But my mod wheel data always quivers slightly anyway... I never draw data that is perfectly linear, even when the volume is supposed to be kept constant... because people are decidedly inconstant.

    -Tom

  7. #7

    Re: mod wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by Tomdini
    I can't imagine playing a loud note (high mod wheel data) on a flute and not manage to accent that note (high velocity data), or at least give it an edgier, quicker attack than a softer note.

    -Tom
    On most instruments, it is actually quite easy to separate articulation from tone. On a real piano a good pianist can get different attacks by the way they press the keys. A loud note on the flute, for example, can easily be sounded without toungueing... hence legato and loud. That is why this mod wheel set-up is so cool. Of course, it is not used for the piano (of course).
    Jess Hendricks
    DMA Student and Teaching Asst in Music Theory/ Composition at the University of Miami
    Personal Website

  8. #8

    Re: mod wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by jbraner
    Tom,
    I've been thinking of it as a volume parameter as a phrase sort of crescendos and decrescendos. Are you saying to make the mod wheel (CC#1) data correspond to to bowing? ie up and down a little as the bow goes back and forth?
    hmmm... interesting....
    I'll add a little more for additional clarification. I'm *not* saying that the mod wheel data corresponds to up and down bowing although it could certainly be used to refine bow strokes, if you like. I've designed other features for up and down bowing (see keyswitched strings in the update.) As Cunnningham and Tomdini have correctly surmised, I was just trying to show that the mod wheel data can be thought of as the means to initiate sound on the acoustic instrument to be simulated. In wind instruments sound begins when air is placed in motion - the greater the speed and quantity of the air, the louder the sound (a simplification - other things like embouchure tension, reeds, mouthpieces, register, instrument bore size, etc., come into play as well). In strings, the greater the pressure and speed of the bow stroke, the louder the sound. Timbre is also affected by the same conditions. Louder is generally brighter (more high frequency content). Brass instruments tend to change drastically in brightness from soft to loud; less so for woodwinds and strings except under certain conditions. The mod wheel is designed to control both volume and timbre in a continuously variable way. As I said before, it's not a "set and forget" volume control.

    While crescendos and diminuendos are correct applications of the mod wheel there are more subtle aspects to volume and timbre changes that can be applied as well. For instance, the ebb and flow of phrasing. Also, the tiny human variations that inevitably occur even when just a single note is being sustained. These are all appropriate uses of the mod wheel.

    Tomdini: On the subject of attack strength and volume level - as a brass player I can assure you that Jess is quite right. A note can be released explosively by allowing air pressure to build up behind the tongue (which blocks the release of the air) followed by rapidly withdrawing the tongue to allow a strong surge of air to initiate the vibration of the lips. Usual result: a very strong accent at a loud level with a very bright tone. Or, a strong air stream can be placed in motion without the intervention of the tongue, also resulting in a very loud note but without creating the explosive accent. At the soft end of the spectrum the tongue can be used to rapidly release a small flow of air resulting in a very sharp, but supple, attack. Or, an extremely gentle attack can be made by just releasing the airstream without using the tongue. This is why I designed the separate use of velocity for attack and volume/timbre for mod wheel. The combination of the two allows for a large variety of attacks at all volume levels.

    Tom

  9. #9

    Re: mod wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    I'm *not* saying that the mod wheel data corresponds to up and down bowing although it could certainly be used to refine bow strokes, if you like. Tom
    Thanks for all the replies. I like to use the mod wheel for phrasing, and I also always squiggle (a technical term) it around (really, I just draw the controller info in SONAR) a little as some of the other posters have suggested.

    I'm aware of the up/down keyswitch, and I used to use a sustain pedal (cc#64) for this too.

    I just thought Tom was suggesting that there was a correlation between up/down bowing and the mod wheel too - so that is now clarified.

    This is a great forum, and definitely one of the most "polite" that I am amember of ;-)

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •