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Topic: Piano lite vs Full piano

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  1. #1

    Piano lite vs Full piano

    Does anyone know what the actual diffrence is for the Steinways pianos? My assumptioin would be that the full versioin has an additional velocity layer? but I'm not quite sure as it is not very transparent for all the notes.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Quote Originally Posted by boten
    Does anyone know what the actual diffrence is for the Steinways pianos? My assumptioin would be that the full versioin has an additional velocity layer? but I'm not quite sure as it is not very transparent for all the notes.
    Thanks

    fewer samples.


    Richard

  3. #3
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
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    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Less filling, same great sound!
    Actually, that is not far off considering it takes fewer loads on your system than Full piano.
    Styxx

  4. #4

    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Quote Originally Posted by boten
    Does anyone know what the actual diffrence is for the Steinways pianos?
    ...about 1 gig of RAM!

    ;-)

    Jim Jarnagin - no not THAT Jim Jarnagin, the other one.

  5. #5

    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Quote Originally Posted by boten
    Does anyone know what the actual diffrence is for the Steinways pianos?
    I've checked with the closest source available and . . . no one *really* knows the difference (as eerie "Twilight Zone" music swells in the background.)

    My assumptioin would be that the full versioin has an additional velocity layer? but I'm not quite sure as it is not very transparent for all the notes.
    Thanks
    Actually, the difference isn't vertical (velocity layers,) it's horizontal (number of samples per octave.) All of the pianos have the same number of layers. The smaller pianos "stretch" fewer samples across the range of the piano. Careful choices can make this technique reasonably successful and save a considerable amount of RAM. Here is a comparison:

    Steinway Piano = 244Mb
    Steinway Piano Lite = 165Mb
    Steinway Piano Duo1 = 125Mb

    Tom

  6. #6

    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    Steinway Piano = 244Mb
    Steinway Piano Lite = 165Mb
    Steinway Piano Duo1 = 125Mb

    Tom
    By its name, I never would have guessed that Duo1 is lighter than Lite...your post was very helpful indeed! And not to hijack this thread, but I always thought a Very Lite version would be quite useful for mock-ups...but that's just me!
    Thanks!

  7. #7

    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Quote Originally Posted by imagegod
    And not to hijack this thread, but I always thought a Very Lite version would be quite useful for mock-ups...but that's just me!
    Thanks!
    I've got a million dollar idea! How about a piano so "lite" it actually ADDS RAM when you load the piano into the player! I'll make that work for all of them - the more instruments you load, the more space you have available!

    I usually draw the line designing lite instruments at the place where further reductions in size cause quite obvious artifacts to become audible. A judgment call. I don't really want extremely small (but inferior sounding) instruments in the library. But, if you have the full version of Kontakt, you could take it upon yourself to reduce and stretch the piano to very tiny sizes by eliminating samples and re-mapping. You could call it The Steinway Hideous Mockup Piano! Hmmm. . . but that might be misconstrued to mean that it was only to be used on hideous mockups . . .

    Tom

  8. #8

    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    I used to use a PMA-5...I don't know what size the samples were, but it had to be extremely small. No artifacts, per se, but clearly not in the same league's as GPO's piano.
    Sort of a GM fill in. But I knew that people who spend thousands on multi-gigabyte samples would disagree...and that's fine!

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    I've got a million dollar idea! How about a piano so "lite" it actually ADDS RAM when you load the piano into the player! I'll make that work for all of them - the more instruments you load, the more space you have available!

    I usually draw the line designing lite instruments at the place where further reductions in size cause quite obvious artifacts to become audible. A judgment call. I don't really want extremely small (but inferior sounding) instruments in the library. But, if you have the full version of Kontakt, you could take it upon yourself to reduce and stretch the piano to very tiny sizes by eliminating samples and re-mapping. You could call it The Steinway Hideous Mockup Piano! Hmmm. . . but that might be misconstrued to mean that it was only to be used on hideous mockups . . .

    Tom

  9. #9

    Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    What about regular GM instruments on your soundcard's synth?
    (I don't mean to hijack the thread either, sorry )
    They only use one total sample, right? Just one for the whole range and expression and velocity just merely control volume. I'm begining to really appreciate GPO right now!
    Actually, I had a synth on an older onboard sound card that had really realistic string sections. The best I've ever heard from a cheezy synth. The solo strings even appeared to get considerably brighter going up every string. So on the cello, the C-F# was very mellow, the C-C# was a bit brighter, the D-G# was even brighter, and the A and up was very bright, but not overdone. Synthy, but the string changing effect was kinda unexpected, but a nice touch.

    OK, I'll stop rambling.

    -Chris

  10. #10
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    Talking Re: Piano lite vs Full piano

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Hopkins
    . . . You could call it The Steinway Hideous Mockup Piano! Hmmm. . . but that might be misconstrued to mean that it was only to be used on hideous mockups . . .

    Tom
    Kinda reminds me of . . .


    Man at Piano Bar: "Hey, can you play 'Sweet Adeline'?

    Piano Player: "How badly do you want to hear it?

    Man: "Oh! Really, really badly!

    Piano Player: Sorry - Can't play it that badly!!


    Yuk Yuk
    Dan

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