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Topic: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

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  1. #1
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    Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    This is not a complaint nor a criticism. (I'm already in enough hot water by not having read the manual.)

    I was curious ... as you have been so careful to recreate most effectively the Strad as it is, why did you allow vibrato on the lower G String which can't be played unless you detune the string? It obviously was a choice, and I would love to use it as it adds such a richness to sound, but it would be impossible for a violinist to recreate.

    Just curious as to what your late night discussions were like?

    Once again, your poster child for what questions not to ask...

    Seeker

  2. #2

    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Seeker,

    All samples are grouped in layers. Vibrato is applied to these layers. Excluding G2 from these layers would mean several additional groups and a more complicated script.

    Moreover, with the real instrument, a very slight vibrato can also be applied to any open string by sympathetic resonance:
    http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesou...cello/vibrato/

    This explains our choice


    Giorgio

  3. #3
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    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Thanks, Giorgio,

    All samples are grouped in layers. Vibrato is applied to these layers. Excluding G2 from these layers would mean several additional groups and a more complicated script.

    I had assumed the reasoning was mainly programming considerations.


    Moreover, with the real instrument, a very slight vibrato can also be applied to any open string by sympathetic resonance:
    http://www.philharmonia.co.uk/thesou...cello/vibrato/


    Thanks for the link. I knew that actual sounding as well as vibrato through sympathetic resonance was possible, but I thought it worked from lower string to upper string, because the lower strings could contain the upper string in its overtones. But of course this wouldn't be necessary because the open upper strings can be played as a stop on a lower string. I had never heard a violinist actually perform vibrato through sympathetic resonance for the G String.

    I have heard a violinist in the course of playing a tonal modern piece actually play the G with full vibrato by actually having the string pre tuned to an F#. He wasn't thrilled about having to do it though.

    Thanks for the reply
    Seeker

  4. #4

    Smile Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Quote Originally Posted by seeker
    Thanks, Giorgio,
    ... I had never heard a violinist actually perform vibrato through sympathetic resonance for the G String.

    I have heard a violinist in the course of playing a tonal modern piece actually play the G with full vibrato by actually having the string pre tuned to an F#. He wasn't thrilled about having to do it though.

    Thanks for the reply
    Seeker
    Yes the vibrato of stradi G string is so deep that it seems coming from a (e.g. F#) detuned string, but G string vibrato is possible on the violin, and it works. The D string is used for the fingering.
    It is a sample of the incredible harmonic resonance of the violin, where the whole instrument body create links between strings and sound. It makes it so nice, and so difficoult to reproduce using samples and synthesis.

    Giorgio did a great job on it.

  5. #5
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    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Thanks Fabio,

    For your additional experience and insight.

    May I add that I agree wholeheartedly with you that Giorgio and the team have done an amazing job. It is such a joy working with the Strad -- truly this product is a work of art!

    Additionally, it says a lot for Gary and the whole organization, that those who actually work on creating these instruments, from the programmer to the top enchilada himself, is available to the consumer. In today's world, it is a rarity. Many times you are lucky if you get any response, let alone from someone knowledgable!

    I am totally impressed with Gary and his assembled team. They have never let me down in the product quality and in their service-oriented ethic. I feel very blessed.

    Hats off to all Gary, Giorgio, and all in the organization.

  6. #6

    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Quote Originally Posted by Giorgio Tommasini
    Moreover, with the real instrument, a very slight vibrato can also be applied to any open string by sympathetic resonance:
    On the real instrument, can't you also bend the neck? I can do that with my $59 Silvertone Electric guitar!
    Dasher
    -------
    It's all about the music - really. I keep telling myself that...

  7. #7

    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Dasher,

    I'm a tad scared in bending the neck of a real Stradivari. That's why I suggested sympathetic resonance to get G2 vibrato.

    I feel much more confident with the virtual instrument, though. So I may try this option as well.

    Giorgio

  8. #8

    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Vibrato on G2 (196 Hz ) is obtained by executing the vibrato on G3 ( 392 Hz ).
    Most famous example: 1st note of Bruch's violin concerto.

    JW.

  9. #9

    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Quote Originally Posted by Giorgio Tommasini
    Dasher,

    I'm a tad scared in bending the neck of a real Stradivari.
    Well, yeah, on a real Strad - but one of my friend's daughters is a blues fanatic and violinist in the high school orchestra - I have seen her bend the neck of her rented violin... (good reason to check those used axes out before purchase. )
    Dasher
    -------
    It's all about the music - really. I keep telling myself that...

  10. #10

    Re: Just curious -- Why Low G String Vibrato?

    Quote Originally Posted by seeker
    I had never heard a violinist actually perform vibrato through sympathetic resonance for the G String.
    It is a standard technique.

    Hannes

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