Here is a list of the patches (sounds) in JABB and their status as to whether the sound is mono or stereo.

This list will be very helpful for those who record all their sounds to audio tracks for mixing.

Since most Digital Audio Workstations allow mono and stereo audio tracks, it would be less stressful for your computer resources to load the mono instruments into a mono track, and the stereo sounds into a stereo track.

The instruments in JABB, like GPO, have a pan setting that is already set to place that instrument onto the stereo field, (stage).

If the instruments you are recording are mono, then you should set the pan in the Kontakt player to "center", then select the appropriate stereo audio group that communicates to your recording track. Once the audio is recorded, the pan in your DAW mixer will be dialed in (by you) to determine the "spacial" location of the instrument.

Conversely, if the patch/sound is stereo, then you should not mess with the pan in the Kontakt player. Of course you can pan the stereo tracks to anywhere in the sound field that you want with the DAW mixer.

Here is an example....
If I use the JABB Steinway piano in an orchestral setting, I would want to place the piano to the left, especially since the given piece of music is not a piano concerto. If you pan the stereo piano pretty far left, then you will be missing about half the sound of the piano, mostly high notes. The high notes, or upper register are predominately heard in the right channel since the piano was (reasonably close mic'd). In this case, you will want to insert a plugin of some type that will allow you to "combine" or blend the left and right information, then the pan can be set where you want it to be in the DAW mixer.

In the case of a piano concerto, you will want the piano center stage, HOWEVER!!!!! you will still want to "blend" or combine "considerably" the left and right channels to NOT allow the listener to hear the separation of high and low notes. Hearing this (stereo spread) would not at all be natural, or even possible if the recording was made with traditionally placed stereo overhead microphones in a real concert hall. In the case of a big band sound, the way in which the piano is blended and panned, is totally dependant on whether you want to create a live sound of a big band or, a studio recording of a big band. Personally, I like the stereo spread of the piano for just about all music types, but NOT classical music.

This information should allow a bogged down computer, to respond a little faster for those bigger projects.
Happy mixing!
dpDan



MONO

Saxes
Bones
Trumpets
Electric Guitars
Basses
Tuba
Accordian

Mono Percussion


Bongos
Cajones
Conga
Cuica
Djembe
Pandero
Quinto
Super Tumba
Surdo
The Box
Tumba
Udu
Cabassa
Guita
Maracas
Shakers
Shekere
Clave
Jam Blocks
Wood Block
Agogo Bells
Bong Bells
Cha Cha Bells
Castinets
Jawbone
Rainstick
Tamborine
Triangles
Whistles
DBL LAYr-HD bass drum




STEREO


Acoustic Guitar
Steinway pianos
Vibraphone hard and soft mallets
Vintage Electric piano (Rhodes)
01 Brush drum kit
02 Brush drum kit, (single layr-hd bass MONO)
Timbales

Handclaps and finger snaps. I recommend that you use an EQ to seriously reduce the gain from of frequencies 150hz and below. The sensitive microphones were too close, and the air is causing an unwanted thump.

14 inch hihat 2
14 inch hihat 1
15 inch hihat
cymbals
SGL-LAYr-HD Bass drum
SGL-LAYr-HD Piccolo snare
SGL-LAY-rHD snare
SGL-LAY-rHD toms
04 Fusion drum kit
DBL LAYr-HD piccolo snare
DBL LAYr-HD snare
DBL LAYr-HD toms
GM classic Jazz drumkit
GM fusion drum kit