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Topic: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

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  1. #1

    Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    Hello All,

    Mixing question for those with more experience than I. Do you put the reverb VST on an AuxSend channel or it's own bus?

    Ie. Say I Have 4 Audio Tracks: Violins 1&2, Viola, Cello

    I could do set the outputs for each of the tracks to the Master bus and create an effect send with the reverb for all 4 (with the reverb channel going to the master bus).

    I could also set the outputs for each of the channels to a reverb bus instead of making it a send and have the reverb bus output to the master bus.

    I've been playing around with it different ways and was interested to hear how other people do it.
    JP Garbarini
    http://musicbyjpg.com

    "A man who is paid to do what he enjoys never works a day in his life." -- Chinese Proverb

  2. #2

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    It depends!!!!!

    But then you knew that didn't you?

    I use reverb (and any effect really) in many ways, and it is the fashion in which I am using it that determines where I put it more than anything.

    I probably have a tendency to use it as a aux send most often simply because I grew up using these big beastly consoles that had limited (with respect to modern DAWs anyway) routing capabilities<G>! Also, deriving a cue mix quite often informed my decision!!!

    The advantage of using an aux send (in a DAW) is that you can control the balance of the feeds to the reverb, but actually, with Sonar anyway, I can do the same thing with a Buss.

    Wow! In Sonar the only practical difference between using an aux send and using a buss is... well gee there has to be a difference... hmmm, well, for example you can insert additional effects in a buss, can't do that with an aux.

    Wow!

    I really hadn't thought about it that deeply, like I said, habits born of working with consoles...

    Now there is a possiblity that your one example means that you send everything to the master buss in the balance that you want, and then insert reverb there... not sure I'd do that in most cases because you lose the ability to manage the balance sent to (and therefore received from) the reverb.

    But other than that, in the platform I use, there really isn't much point to even thinking about it<G>!

    Wow!

    Bill
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

  3. #3

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    The only difference i've noticed so far is that with the Aux, I can solo the reverb channel and hear just the reverb. If I use a bus, soloing the bus just solos any input into the bus. In practice so far, I've found it's nice to solo the reverb to hear exactly how much reverb is ending up in the final mix. On the downside, adjusting the DRY in the Aux channel isn't having the same effect it has when I adjust it in a bus.

    Need to play around with it some more
    JP Garbarini
    http://musicbyjpg.com

    "A man who is paid to do what he enjoys never works a day in his life." -- Chinese Proverb

  4. #4

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    Using an AUX send you can adjust the wetness of the reverb and also keep the dry signal as well.

  5. #5

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    Could someone explain to a tired brain the difference between an aux send and a reverb bus? And how to set it up in Cubase SX?

    I maybe already know it, but can't picture what those words mean right now...

    Thanks!
    Greetings from Vienna!
    Peter
    My website: Above the staff.net

  6. #6

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    A bus is just another module in the output chain where you can route a track signal to or send a signal from that particular track.

    To make it simple, suppose you create a bus and insert a reverb effect into that bus. Now that bus becomes a reverb buss. You can route any one of your audio tracks or VSTi audio tracks directly to that buss for that reverb effect. Your reverb buss will also have its own output signal to be routed to another buss or go directly to your main output.

    As an alternative, instead of routing a track signal directly to that reverb buss you can request that reverb buss to apply its reverb effect on that track in its own separate signal. The amount of reverb to applied from that reverb buss on your track will depend on how much you specify in the send signal. Here is a diagram:

    Example one:

    Track --> Reverb Buss --> Main output.

    Example two:

    Track --> Main ouput
    Track Send (100%) --> Reverb Buss --> Main output


    Example three:

    Track --> Main Output
    Track Send (50%) --> Reverb Buss --> Main output.

    In example 1, the entire track signal is processed through the reverb buss

    In example 2, the main track signal is sent directly to your main output with no reverb. But that tracks second signal is sent to the buss reverb for 100% reverb effect.

    In example 3, again, the main track signal is sent directly to your main output with no reverb. But that tracks second signal is sent to the buss reverb for only 50% reverb effect before goting to your main output.

    In examples 2 and 3, if you were to mute your main track, you would still be able to here your reverb effect by itself, its strength (wetness) either 50% or 100%.

    Hope this makes sense so far.

    Once a buss is set up, you can route any track to it for reverb. You can also send a signal from any track to it. You also can route a buss to a buss. You can send signals from a bus to another bus as well. The possibilities are endless.

    The most obvious reason to create a buss is that you can route as many tracks as you want to it for reverb instead of inserting the same reverb effect in multiple tracks, thereby conserving CPU processing. Using the [SEND] method, you have more control over how much reverb [wetness] you want from each track.

    In Cubase, there are two types of busses called FX buss and Group Buss. You can send signals to an FX bus but the FX bus itself can only be routed to another FX bus or output bus. The Group Buss is a little more versatile in that it can either route to another buss or send its signal to another buss. But the group buss is limited in that it can route or send only to busses placed after it in the output chain. Look in the manual for the differences, but it is a little confusing the way Cubase bussing is set up.

    It has been implied that Cubase 4 will be doing away with having 2 busses and employ one kind of buss do what Group busses and Fx busses were doing.

    Hope this makes sense.

  7. #7

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    YES! This makes a lot of sense to me! Thank you for explaining it so well!

    It seems that I have been doing what you describe all the time, but I did not know some of the vocabulary. Thank you for clearing that up!

    I grew a bit smarter, yet again...
    Greetings from Vienna!
    Peter
    My website: Above the staff.net

  8. #8

    Re: Reverb : Aux Send or Bus?

    Quote Originally Posted by kstevege
    A bus is just another module in the output chain where you can route a track signal to or send a signal from that particular track.<wonderful explanation snipped>
    Dang but you are a lot more energetic than I am<G>!

    Nice explanation...

    Bill
    Bill Thompson
    Audio Enterprise
    KB3KJF

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