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Topic: Recovery Mode

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  1. #1

    Recovery Mode

    After finally getting everything set up, functioning, and having produced about 25 minutes of semi- finished material with GPO, I have to start from scratch again. Like the old Beetles tune, "he came in through the bathroom window...." and stole my laptop DAW with everything on it. Had gotten to use it for all of 4 months.
    I've lived in this house for 27 years without a burlary, so I s'pose I was due. But why my music? Yep, all the work files went too. But that is as nothing. What really smarts is the prospect of having to set the whole bloody thing up again.

    Okay, enough whining.

    Fact is, I was having lots of annoyances with my setup anyway. It was a D600 Windows laptop, running Cubase SX and Wavelab. But I never got rid of the pops and clicks problem. It was forever giving me trouble making connection with my M-Audio interface. And very frankly, I never found Cubase anything but !*%?# when it came to editing--so clumsy & limited for selecting and moving musical material around on individual or multiple tracks. There's got to be a better way!

    So I'm looking at the bright side: it could be time to switch to a Mac, and hopefully to a better GPO-friendly sequencer!

    Any thoughts on making this switch, and on what sequencer software I should consider? Most of the big ones--Sonar and Cubase are the ones I've tried--seem too porked out with a lot of stuff I don't need. Their interfaces appear thought out by engineers rather than musicians. This is a little bit like shopping for a mattress that doesn't kill my back, I guess. You can keep throwing money at the problem, or you can just accept the morning backache and get on with life. But maybe there really is a cleaner, more intuitive and flexible solution. Any thoughts about the virtues/drawbacks of LogicPro or other Mac-ish applications?

    Conquering and making peace with this technology is becoming my holy grail. Discouragement is no option.

  2. #2
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    Re: Recovery Mode

    These days I don't see any advantage of MAC's over PC's. You can usually purchase PC's with more power for less money that a MAC.

    I've been using Sonar for years without any major issues. The latest versions are comparable as are most programs with the MAC programs. I think it's an even playing field between most of the major programs. You will find bloat in pretty much every program as most users are looking for more features these days. It's recommended by most programs to use the included plugins as they are compatible with the host program. Personally, I like the included plugins with Sonar.

    Jim

  3. #3

    Re: Recovery Mode

    Thanks for the opinion on Mac vs. Windows. It's reassuring that you think Windows computers are just as good, more bang for the buck as you suggest. I don't mean to sound overly negative about Sonar and Cubase; I appreciate what they're able to do. It is miraculous that we can work with these instruments in our home environments for a relatively small investment and get such amazing results. What I meant was, that somewhere between a truncated program like Ableton Live (which seems to leave out CC controller functions except for velocity) and the full- function setups, there could, or ought to be a "sweet spot" program. I'm not a programmer. But the old DOS based sequencers I remember from the eighties seemed more intuitive, and in some ways more flexible, than what we use now. I accept that what I would like isn't available. But I'd like to know if I'm the only one that's annoyed by having to go through so many steps to do simple tasks like select a loop, for example, when clicking and dragging with a mouse might just as well do the job. Cubase really is clumsy that way (for selecting and editing MIDI.) Maybe Sonar is better these days? I used to work with old Cakewalk Pro, but that was a while back and it had its own quirks or I'd have stayed with it instead of moving to Cubase

    Ableton seems to be trying to address the issue of being more user-friendly. If they deal with the controllers better, I would happily try them with GPO.

    Until that day, I'll of course work with what's out there.

  4. #4

    Re: Recovery Mode

    The main advantage of Macs over PCs today is that there have never been any viruses or spyware that run on Mac OS X.

    Thus far, there has never been a need to purchase antivirus software for Mac OS X. And there is no such thing as anti-spyware software for Mac OS X because there isn't anything to anti-.

    So you can run a Mac without having to be vigilant and paranoid about what Web sites you visit and what email attachments you open. And you don't have to pay annual fees for security software you don't need.

    For some reason a lot of people I've met who only use Windows flat out don't believe that there is no real-world malware on the Mac. I don't know why, because it's perfectly true. I've been using a Mac every day for eighteen years, so I'm clear on the concept.

    Apple is regarded to have a better handle on system security than Microsoft. Apple provides security updates to users as often as any perceived vulnerabilities are discovered--even though there have never been any real-world viruses that affect the platform. (Mac OS X comes with a good firewall program, which everybody should use anyway.)

    The one drawback to getting a Mac for music work is a temporary one that should be resolved in the next couple of months. Nine months ago Apple switched over from using IBM CPUs (G4, G5) to Intel CPUs (Core Duo and Core 2 Duo), and that requires new versions of existing software programs. There are some essential titles of music software, chiefly Native Instruments Kontakt and Kontakt Player, that do not yet exist in a version that runs natively on Mac on Intel. So if you were to purchase a new Mac today, you would not be able to use Garritan Personal Orchestra, which requires Kontakt Player.

    Native Instruments swears they will have a fix for this available before the end of October.

    http://www.native-instruments.com/in...1ff8da369312c9

    Us Mac guys are holding our breath. (I still have a G4 Mac and I'm not buying a new one until these little "growing pains" get resolved).
    Wheat Williams
    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Music Copyist in Sibelius
    Apple MacBook Pro, Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion
    Apple Certified Support Professional. I also work with Windows.

  5. #5

    Re: Recovery Mode

    Thanks for that angle, Wheat. I didn't realize that the new Intel processors weren't Kontakt ready. I have considered looking for a used G4 or 5. I don't know if I want to wait several months before I get up and running with GPO again. My impression at the Apple store was that they provide quite a lot of hands-on support in getting set up, which I find tempting because of my arduous experiences with my last setup. I finally got there, but it was like crossing a desert on foot.

    I know Windows (for better and worse.) So maybe I'll end up sticking with that devil. Don't know yet.

  6. #6

    Re: Recovery Mode

    Never used a Mac, but im envious they can use Digital Performer and logic (specially DP), and that they have an strong firewire support that pc`s dont have. (at least that i read here )
    Marcelo Colina

  7. #7

    Re: Recovery Mode

    I can see this will become a Mac versus PC topic...so I feel obliged to put in my two cents.

    There are three major operating systems out there, Mac, Windows, and Linux. I myself prefer Unix based systems (Mac and Linux) for several reasons yet still use Windows heavily.

    Linux - This small system is often overlooked in the audio world. Someone needs to make some software for it so we can use its full power. Because of the size of the basic Linux installation (and even the larger ones), it can handle higher needs. This ability to accomplish tasks quickly without worrying about system resources is why Linux runs the internet (80-90% I believe). I myself have run Ubuntu, Linspire, Freespire, Fedora, SuSE, Gentoo, Slackware, Debian, and Likos Archi (my own distribution). There are many more versions out there, so the choice depends on your needs. The problem with Linux though is the amount of computing knowledge required to use it. The basic Linux user is typically a power user.

    Mac - Not quite as powerful as Linux, but its lightweight system design allows for it to perform tasks still at a fast speed. I still own a PowerMac G4 400 MHz and am looking into getting a Mac Mini just to get myself more used to the system. So far, I'm loving it (where have I heard those three words before?). Yet, as well as Mac may perform within the studio world, it just isn't necessarily all that cheap.

    Windows - This one I'm probably going to take rather harshly as I have gone through some bad times on Windows (losing files many times). Because of Windows' popularity, it hosts a wide range of programs. Of course, a large portion of these programs are far from professional and have a very rough feel to them. There is also the stability Windows has become so well known for (say what you want, but my Windows system has been down more times than my Mac and Linux put together). Then there are the resources. Once I toss in all of the background processes I normally run, I'm left with approx. 50% of the resources unused. These are the same kinds of processes I run on my Mac and Linux systems, and those rarely peak 10% usage rates whereas my Windows system is almost always over 50%. And don't even get me started with the problems I have experienced on Windows Vista.

    As you can see, I am biased towards unix. I like the lightweight design of the systems while Windows just seems too bloated for my liking. Unfortunately, since my family refuses to switch, I'm stuck using Windows almost all of the time (cept on the occasion I need to use my 400 MHz Mac...can't do much when it is only 400 MHz).
    Colton J. Provias
    Film Score Composer, Location Sound Mixer, and Sound Editor
    Full-stack Web Developer

  8. #8

    Re: Recovery Mode

    Quote Originally Posted by Wheat Williams
    The main advantage of Macs over PCs today is that there have never been any viruses or spyware that run on Mac OS X.

    [....]

    For some reason a lot of people I've met who only use Windows flat out don't believe that there is no real-world malware on the Mac. I don't know why, because it's perfectly true. I've been using a Mac every day for eighteen years, so I'm clear on the concept.
    No, it's not true. The first "real virus" for Mac OS X was apparently found in February this year by Sophos.
    2.16.2006 News
    Mac OS X Virus Alert - Sophos Anti Virus has found the first 'real virus' for Mac OS X known as OSX/Leap-A or OSX/Oompa-A. The OSX/Leap worm or trojan is spread via instant messenger forwarding itself as a file named 'latestpics.tgz'. When launched the worm attempts to spread via iChat sending itself to the users buddy list. The application will also try to infect the recently used applications.

  9. #9

    Re: Recovery Mode

    Quote Originally Posted by claysf
    Any thoughts on making this switch, and on what sequencer software I should consider? Most of the big ones--Sonar and Cubase are the ones I've tried--seem too porked out with a lot of stuff I don't need.
    Just a thought: All those features you think you're never going to use, maybe one day some of them will be exactly what you are looking for. At least that's what happened to me a few times.

    With a well-designed program all that stuff shouldn't get in your way too much -- you should be able to ignore it until you need it.

    BTW, I use DP5 on a Mac, and I haven't ever felt like cursing it yet.
    Martin
    Canberra, Australia

  10. #10

    Re: Recovery Mode

    Quote Originally Posted by Nickie Fønshauge
    The first "real virus" for Mac OS X was apparently found in February this year by Sophos.
    I've never heard of anybody actually getting this virus, and I do read up on the subject.

    In July 2006, Sophos made an official recommendation:

    "the continued dominance of Windows-based threats has prompted Sophos to suggest that many home users should consider switching to Apple Macs, to shield themselves from the malware onslaught."

    You can read the details at:

    http://www.sophos.com/pressoffice/ne...rtmid2006.html

    So, Mac OS X had one virus that nobody actually ever got, while Windows has 114,000 viruses that untold thousands of people got.

    http://www.apple.com/getamac/viruses.html

    I use both Windows and Mac every day. Each has its strengths and weaknesses, advantages and disadvantages. My only point is that if you use a Mac, you don't have to worry about malware. If you are a knowledgeable computer user and take precautions against malware, then Windows may be a good choice for you.
    Wheat Williams
    Atlanta, Georgia, USA
    Music Copyist in Sibelius
    Apple MacBook Pro, Mac OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion
    Apple Certified Support Professional. I also work with Windows.

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